“Get well soon!” That’s a common saying. All of us have heard it. But what if you have an illness that you won’t ever get better from? The most horrible part of having a chronic illness is that it’s forever, or for a very long time. Unless your personal miracle comes, your illness will always be with you. There isn’t an end in sight. There’s just adjusting to the pain, the tiredness, ...

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I knew it was bad when she couldn’t tell me her name. I watched her face fill with frustration as a word she had uttered countless times over eight decades somehow got lost between her brain and her lips. It was 2 a.m. and I was on call as the surgical resident. I had been told that a patient with bladder cancer was being transferred from another hospital, and, as these ...

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After more than fifteen years of being mostly housebound by chronic illness (which includes chronic pain), here are a few of the dilemmas I’ve faced over and over. I’m confident that I’m not alone in my “should I/shouldn’t I?” world. Do I accept an invitation from a friend to get together or do I refuse it? If I refuse the invitation, depending on who issued it, it may be the last one ...

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Many of us now have high-deductible health insurance plans, which makes us “cash-pay” patients until we meet our deductibles. According to a Health Affairs health policy brief, high deductible plans are now much more prevalent in both individual and group markets. The higher the deductible, the lower the monthly premium. If you have a high deductible plan and don’t consume much medical care, you are most likely a cash pay ...

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One hot topic that has recently gained a relatively large amount of attention over almost all areas of medicine is quality improvement. Hospitals have created dedicated senior-level positions to oversee it, interdisciplinary councils have been formed to research and address it, and employees are reminded daily, if not more often, of their role in implementing it in the form of various quality benchmarks they are held accountable for (such as ...

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I grew up thinking an “illness” was either a fever or croup. Illness was a stuffy nose -- a sick day, an excuse to miss a day of school. At 18 years old, “illness” took on an entirely different meaning. Illness meant waking up from a coma, learning that my stomach exploded, I had no digestive system, and I was to be stabilized with IV nutrition until surgeons could figure ...

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Vox's Sarah Kliff wrote a story of how patients are the health care system's free labor.  It's a good article, go read it. I did a quick take on Facebook Live, imploring doctors and patients that they need to be on the same side.  We want to same thing: Better care for patients.  Neither can change health care by themselves.  If we truly want to make a difference, doctors and ...

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Like many physicians, I’m a people pleaser.  On my medical school application, my personal statement was a literary cliché filled with my dreams of helping others, easing pain, soothing suffering -- and I really meant it.  What I didn’t know then was how difficult it would be to negotiate making patients happy while doing the right thing medically. Medical school and residency didn’t adequately prepare me for the emotional strain of ...

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Among hospice staff, it is called “getting it.” One says, “He doesn’t get it,” “I think she gets it,” or, “They definitely get it.” It is a little hard to define, but as with pornography, you know it when you see it.   Nonetheless, given the importance of “getting” good end-of-life care, let us take a moment to try and explain. The 92-year-old patient is bleeding into her head, but has blood ...

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As a registered nurse and health care writer and editor for more than 25 years, I routinely wrote or assigned stories to other writers about the health of LGBT individuals.  I valued these stories not only because I was a nurse, but also because I thought the subject was worthy of coverage. I believed our nurse readers should be aware of the specific health needs of their LGBT patients. I followed ...

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