It was July 2012 and I was pregnant with my third child. As an experienced mother and labor and delivery nurse, I felt very comfortable at 29-weeks gestation and anticipated the usual course of pregnancy. However, at 30 weeks, I started battling with preterm labor issues. This eventually led to the early delivery of my son, a four week and stay in the NICU, and a life lesson in cost-awareness ...

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From time immemorial until about 75 years ago or so most babies were born at home. Now it’s around 1% in the USA, although it’s much higher than that in many Western European countries. The shift to hospital births paralleled the growth of hospitals, pediatrics, and obstetrics. With that shift there has been a perceived decrease in women’s autonomy over their healthcare decisions. There has also been an unsurprising jump in ...

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Vaginal video games: What to make of mobile Kegel apps There are two new high-tech ways that aim to help you with Kegel exercises, both with Kickstarter campaigns. There is the Skea (Smart Kegel Exercise Aid), basically a video game that proposes controlling the avatar with a vaginal probe that uses the pelvic floor muscles and kGoal, a vaginal insert that is meant to connect wirelessly with your smart phone and measures your squeeze ...

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There are doctors that patients see. And there are the doctors that patients almost never see. Patients see me, an obstetrician, at prenatal visits, in the ultrasound unit, or on the labor floor. But they don’t see all the wise radiologists reviewing their imaging studies, or the educated pathologist assessing whether their biopsy is cancerous. Some of the most important doctors that our patients don’t see are the ones in the ...

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You’d think, being land-based mammals, we’d all be able to agree on the basic fact that humans breathe air, and that newborn human babies ought to be born into the air.  You know, so they can breathe. That’s how human babies have always been born, and that’s how all other primates are born, and that’s how all other land mammals are born. (Hats off to our cetacean cousins for their ...

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George Will continues with his assertion that it is mathematically impossible for 1 in 5 women to have been sexually assaulted while in college. He calls the statistics “insupportable” and when he replied to Senators Blumenthal, Feinstein, Baldwin, and Casey he chided them to temper their “rhetoric” about the “scourge of sexual assault.” But it’s not just the statistics that appear to bother Mr. Will as he also expresses concern ...

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During my third year of residency I trained for and completed an Ironman triathlon. I’ve discovered, despite its growing popularity, many people have no idea what a triathlon is and often nod at me in hesitant approval when I talk about this particular passion of mine. An Ironman triathlon is a 2.4-mile swim, a 112-mile bike ride, and a 26.2-mile run, completed in succession, all in one day. And it happens ...

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Dear Mr. Will, I read your recent column on the “supposed campus epidemic of rape, a.k.a. sexual assault” and am somewhat taken aback by your claim that forcing colleges to take a tougher stand on sexual assault somehow translates into a modern version of The Crucible that replaces witchcraft with rape hysteria. I was specifically moved to write to you because the rape scenario that you describe somewhat incredulously is not unfamiliar to me. ...

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I’m 34 weeks pregnant and working hard to keep this baby inside me for as long as possible. As with my last pregnancy, there’s a real risk that the baby could come too early. But we’re both holding on so far, thanks to a combination of luck, modified bed rest and medical science. The science is my biggest concern right now. I will spare you much of it because, man or ...

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What if healthy pregnancies were treated like special needs pregnancies? Mr. and Mrs. Johnson, good afternoon. I’m Doctor Dumas, a visiting obstetrician in Doctor Kwak’s practice. It’s nice to meet you. Look, there’s no easy way to say this, so at the risk of sounding blunt, I have some bad news. The technician and I reviewed your scans and we found that you’re about ten weeks along with a human fetus. I’m not seeing ...

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