I was volunteering at one of the free clinics associated with my medical school last weekend, and while teaching a medical student how to sew a cut, he queried, "That is an interesting technique, who taught you how to suture? Are you a surgeon?" "I am actually a radiologist," I replied. "To answer your first question, I was actually taught this by an obstetrician during my third year of medical school." Puzzled, ...

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On May 2, 2015, at approximately 6 a.m. local time, the Duchess of Cambridge was admitted to the Lindo Wing of Saint Mary’s Hospital after going into labor. At 8:34 a.m., the Duke and Duchess welcomed a baby girl, Charlotte Elizabeth Diana, into the world weighing 8 lbs. 3 oz. Kensington Palace announced the arrival of the fourth royal in line to the British throne at 11 a.m. At around ...

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It was a Wednesday in late spring, 1972. I was a nursing student in my final months of training, eagerly awaiting graduation. When I arrived on the maternity ward that morning, my nursing instructor told me that I'd be caring for a baby, only hours old, with special needs. I thought she'd send me to the neonatal ICU. Instead, to my surprise, she motioned toward the linen closet, its doors closed tight. "The ...

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shutterstock_202121116 I suffered from extreme nausea during my pregnancy; I had triplets, and I’m pretty sure I had a triple dose. I never threw up, but you know how your mouth salivates the moment right before you vomit, that sensation that sends you running to the bathroom? I had that. All. Day. Long. For four weeks. By day four or five I was ...

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medpagetodayFrom MedPage Today:

  1. Testosterone Shots: Riskier Than Gels or Patches? Short-acting testosterone injections are associated with greater risk of cardiovascular events, hospitalizations, and death compared with gels or patches, according to a large retrospective cohort study.
  2. Liberia Declared Free of Ebola. In what the World Health Organization called a "monumental achievement," Liberia ...

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shutterstock_146442830 For many women, pregnancy is a wonderful experience. There are, however, many changes and challenges the mom-to-be can expect, and back pain is one of them. The good news for pregnant women is that the development of severe or debilitating low back pain is very rare. The incidence of symptomatic low back pain that is severe is about 1 to 2 percent. ...

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Patients are gradually becoming more aware of the value of second opinions on their pathology slides. When there is a significant change in the diagnosis, the decision to get a second opinion can be life altering and even life-saving. A recent example is the case of Rita Wilson, where the self-initiated second opinion of her breast biopsy resulted in a change in diagnosis from a non-invasive lesion ...

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I walk into the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) each morning and see as many as 15 tiny patients. Some born just a few weeks premature, but others born so early they could fit into the palm of my hand, weighing as little as a pound. And I can’t help but think that there should be better communication about how to reduce the risk of preterm labor. Even if we ...

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shutterstock_99659051 Medicine is plagued by a form of prejudice called “specialism.” (Yes, I just made up that word, but it fits.) In medical school we were united; we were all in the same boat; we were a team making our way through the gauntlet together. And then it came time to choose a specialty. A satirical article by “Lord Lockwell” circulated on social ...

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shutterstock_210431020 Here are ten ways that Internet diagnosing interferes with your health care. 1. Dr. Google doesn’t know you. Can’t see you, can’t hear your story, can’t smell you, and can’t touch you. It doesn’t have intuition or gut feelings about you. 2. The Internet breeds cyberchondria in some and false reassurance in others. The more complex the problem, the more likely your self-diagnosis ...

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