shutterstock_174197693 I hear this fairly often: Women telling me they asked their GYN for an IUD and were told that they couldn’t because they had never had children. Their GYNs are wrong and unfortunately it’s not just a few who think this way. A study from last year tells us that 32 percent of OB/GYNs think that women who have never ...

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shutterstock_266789546 Last night, one of my close and friends told me the story of her recent trip for her annual gynecology appointment. Her longtime gynecologist had retired, and she was meeting her new physician. After taking a history, the first new physician explained to her that since she always had normal Pap smears, including recent ones from the past several years, she ...

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shutterstock_50320798 The scalpel hits the skin immediately, splaying it open with one smooth swipe. Two more swipes through yellow globular fat and I hit the glistening white fascia layer. If this weren't an emergency, I would stop to carefully cauterize the small bleeding blood vessels in the fat layer, but there is no time for that now. I nick the middle of ...

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shutterstock_206493670 A new paper in the journal Lancet Oncology evaluates outcomes after vaccination with Cervarix, which is the HPV vaccine that is effective against the 2 most oncogenic (cancer-causing) strains: HPV 16 and 18. The paper is actually a compilation of results from two studies of Cervarix among women ages 15-25 and now has four years of follow-up data on more ...

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shutterstock_128145248 Currently the HPV (human papilloma virus) vaccines are approved in the United States up to the age of 26. This has nothing to do with safety but due to the fact that the studies submitted to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) involved this age range. The HPV vaccines were primarily studied in women aged 26 years and younger because age ...

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shutterstock_211897159 1. Due to intermittent monitoring versus continuous fetal monitoring which is standard in the hospital, the patient has increased mobility and a wider range of laboring positions/options: sitting, standing, walking, water, birthing balls. The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) has agreed that there is not a medical benefit to continuous fetal monitoring compared to intermittent monitoring in low-risk women. 2. ...

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shutterstock_250129084 As adolescent medicine physicians based in the Bronx, which has one of the highest teen pregnancy rates in the nation, we frequently see how young patients become pregnant before they are ready to be parents. While U.S. pregnancy rates among girls aged 15 to 19 years have been declining over the past two decades, still nearly 600,000 girls younger than 20 years ...

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Thankfully, many medical conditions that once were never discussed in public, such as cancer, AIDS, and even infertility, have largely shed their stigma and sense of secrecy. Miscarriage holds an unusual place in medicine in being both common and something that many in society thinks is rare. One in four pregnancies ends in miscarriage, and there are 1,000,000 miscarriages each year in the U.S. -- yet miscarriage remains shrouded in privacy ...

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An excerpt form Baby City: An Inside Look into Labor & Delivery. I am going to make this medical student cry. I don’t know how I know it, but somehow I can sense it. I know it the second she walks into the resident room on labor and delivery at Cadence ...

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I was volunteering at one of the free clinics associated with my medical school last weekend, and while teaching a medical student how to sew a cut, he queried, "That is an interesting technique, who taught you how to suture? Are you a surgeon?" "I am actually a radiologist," I replied. "To answer your first question, I was actually taught this by an obstetrician during my third year of medical school." Puzzled, ...

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