A few years ago, I was doing a summer internship in which I looked at health outcomes for hospitalized patients. I sat in an office and read about patients with issues like high blood pressure and cholesterol. At a certain point, I realized that the reports on their outcomes were interesting, but the real solution to the problems I was studying was happening outside my window. My window overlooked a ...

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Top stories in health and medicine, October 9, 2014From MedPage Today:

  1. Obese Kids Face Greater Risk for Heart Disease. The adverse long-term influence of obesity and elevated blood pressure on left ventricular remodeling begins in childhood, according to findings from the world's longest running biracial heart study.
  2. IBM's Watson Comes to the Bedside. If a physician or a patient could ...

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I direct a nutrition clinic in a large center for children with special needs. My kids can have everything from mild learning disabilities to genetic disorders that affect growth and development to profound intellectual and physical impairments that cause them to be unable to walk, speak or even scratch their heads. My most seriously involved kids are completely dependent for all their care. Children who are somewhere in between -- for example, children who ...

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To the inevitable backdrop of John Philip Souza marches and presidential photo-ops, big soda has announced that it will do some vague kind of something about the excesses they contribute to our intake of calories and sugars over something like ten years. (Unless, of course, they don't.) Cue the 21-gun salute! Release the confetti! Folks, that this is heralded as "huge" news -- and by our former head of state, no ...

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The joys of September! Parents gleefully shove their reluctant children onto school buses, the palm trees in Los Angeles don’t change color, and everyone realizes that they gained 20 pounds during their summer vacation. It’s time to get serious again about losing weight. But how should you eat to best help you shed the extra pounds? Many people are passionate about their favorite diet, but there is very little data comparing ...

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Many organizations cook up recommendations for the number of fruit and vegetable servings you should eat every day.  Well known examples include the USDA which suggests two cups of fruit and two and a half cups of vegetables daily (approximately 8 to 10 servings), the American Heart Association which recommends 8 to 10 and the Harvard School of Public Health suggests somewhere between five and 13 servings of fruit and ...

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In my pediatric nutrition practice, I often preach about getting more fruits and vegetables into the diets of the children I see. Eating more vegetables is a proven way to fight obesity and promote better health. Sometimes the question of where and how to find healthy food comes up during my conversations with parents. Many of my clients reside in the Bronx, where sometimes the closest vegetable is the pickle on ...

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When I was in medical residency, more than thirty years ago, I ran with a pack of fellow residents, all guys who were fit to varying degrees. Once, on an outing, we discussed the -- hopefully -- hypothetical question: "If the need arose, which one of us would we eat first?" "Randy!" my friends gleefully concluded. "His meat would be the most marbled," one added. I've never been fat. More accurately, my body ...

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Top stories in health and medicine, August 19, 2014From MedPage Today:

  1. Hospitals Question Charity for Some Patients. As more Americans gain insurance under the federal health law, hospitals are rethinking their charity programs, with some scaling back help for those who could have signed up for coverage but didn't.
  2. Antibiotics Early in Life May Boost Obesity Risk. Exposure to antibiotics ...

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Top stories in health and medicine, August 12, 2014From MedPage Today:

  1. Low Obesity Risk Score Can Still Equal Major Health Problems. Young adults who scored slightly higher on an obesity risk assessment scale still had significantly worse dietary habits than those who were at lower risk.
  2. Feds' $10 Billion Search For Healthcare's Next Big Ideas. The Affordable Care Act was ...

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