Evan Murray was a 17-year-old high school senior, honor student, and three-sport athlete who died recently as a direct result of injuries sustained playing quarterback for his school football team.  On the last play of his life, he got drilled by a defender with a clean hit to the midsection.  He gathered himself, rose, and walked off the field on his own.  Shortly thereafter, however, he collapsed on the sideline ...

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shutterstock_172354895 Compassion.  Once upon a time, I had a lot of it. I guess I still do, or I wouldn't be at this desk. I think most medical students start out that way. We want to help the sick, heal the wounded, decrease suffering. All that stuff we once wrote in the "personal statement" section of the universal med school application. And believed. A friend ...

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Everyone, it seems, knows about the Ice Bucket Challenge, the viral phenomenon that raised record-breaking sums for the Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) Association. This feel-good movement was critiqued by many, but no one can claim it was a bad thing: It raised lots of money, the overwhelming ...

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The vast majority of physicians enter medicine with an inborn sense of compassion. Junior residents, however, are the logistical workhorses of teaching hospitals — their north star is efficiency and they are measured largely on their capacity to “get things done.” The consequence is often a slide towards unwitting apathy. I, like all residents, have witnessed this reality first-hand. By reflecting on my experiences, I hope to discover insights we ...

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shutterstock_154181867 The most important factor in successful stroke treatment is time. When a stroke patient is encountered by EMS, or when they present to an emergency department, it is absolutely vital to determine the time "last known well" to make decisions about what treatments may be available and appropriate. A 97-year-old woman arrived in our emergency department after suddenly becoming unable to speak, and ...

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shutterstock_210047401 In 1735, Benjamin Franklin wrote, “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” Now 280 years later, this basic concept of human health has been refined and applied throughout medicine. Recently, the emphasis on prevention has been amplified by the passage of the Affordable Care Act that prioritizes such services. Radiology remains uniquely poised for this change with its ...

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shutterstock_109841906 Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 28-year-old man is evaluated for a 5-year history of recurrent headache that occurs several times per month and lasts 12 to 24 hours. He describes the headache as a bilateral frontal pressure associated with nasal congestion and sensitivity to light, sound, and ...

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051809+Maureen+Dowd+p1 If I’m to take fashion advice from Maureen Dowd’s March 3 column, “Stroke of Fate,” a take-down of emergency medicine disguised as a recovery narrative of her niece, then I should exchange my white coat for grease-stained overalls. In her column, a Harvard neurology professor who specializes in stroke describes the brain as the Rolls-Royce of the human body. When it ...

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A new series by the physicians over at Health Sketch explain what a stroke is and its symptoms.  A nice explanation, presented in visual, easy to understand terms.

As I have been known to say on this blog once or twice before, one of my favorite things about being a developmental pediatrician is the opportunity to follow the children I see for initial diagnostic evaluation over the long term. New research presented at the Pediatric Academic Societies conference makes me especially hopeful. When our clinical ...

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