Acute kidney injury (AKI) is hard. Things that seem like they should work often don't. Just ask Perry Wilson. And even the most predictable cases of AKI are resistant to intervention. Look at bypass surgery. We know days in advance the time and place the AKI will occur and despite that foreknowledge, like Cassandra, we are powerless to prevent the AKI. Same with contrast administration (or not). Same ...

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Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 57-year-old man is evaluated for a diagnosis of acute kidney injury. He was diagnosed with gastroesophageal reflux disease 3 weeks ago and was prescribed omeprazole. Several days ago he noticed lower extremity swelling and decreased frequency of urination. Laboratory evaluation showed a serum creatinine level of 2.2 mg/dL (194.5 µmol/L). ...

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Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 54-year-old woman is evaluated for fatigue, anorexia, polyuria, and nocturia of several weeks' duration. She had otherwise felt well until the onset of her current symptoms. Medical history is significant for autoimmune pancreatitis diagnosed 1 year ago, treated with a prednisone taper that was completed 8 months ago with resolution ...

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acp new logoA guest column by the American College of Physicians, exclusive to KevinMD.com. A couple of months ago I received a Facebook invitation to “like” a page. That was not unusual, and usually the pages are on silly or obscure topics, but this page was different. The name of the page was New Kidney for Stu. Stuart ...

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If you want to understand what ails the U.S. health care system, look no farther than the dialysis industry. A recent New York Times article, "UnitedHealthcare Sues Dialysis Chain Over Billing," provides a pre-made case study. In brief, a chain of dialysis clinics, American Renal Associates, pushed poor people out of government coverage and into private insurance with UnitedHealthcare so that the clinics could bill $4,000 per treatment rather than $200. A ...

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Around 30 years ago, LRZ taught me a most important lesson.  LRZ, one of my most fondly remembered patients, was a classic blue collar guy.  He had a wonderful, gregarious personality.  He had significant systolic dysfunction, yet still worked hard for the city.  Amongst other things he did, he shoveled the salt into trucks on snow and ice days.  He functioned well most days. One day he came to see me. ...

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dreamrct The most valuable assignment I received in fellowship was to write a few textbook chapters. I wrote on sodium, calcium, potassium, phosphorus, and magnesium for three different chapters. I had already developed deep knowledge of electrolytes writing "The Fluid and Electrolyte Companion," but writing these chapters forced me to look beyond how things work and dive into how we know how things ...

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Yesterday my friend Sophie asked me to accompany her to a Miami hospital intensive care unit to see her older brother, Guillermo. He'd been admitted the previous night with seizures and cardiac arrhythmia. Joined by my husband, we made our way to the ICU. When she saw Guillermo lying immobile, swollen and unresponsive, with a breathing tube in his mouth and other tubes snaking into his chest from IV poles, Sophie ...

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Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 53-year-old woman is evaluated for a 3-month history of swelling of the face, hands, and feet. She has untreated hepatitis C virus infection. She takes lithium for bipolar disorder. She has no additional symptoms. On physical examination, temperature is normal, blood pressure is 134/93 mm Hg, pulse rate is 71/min, and respiration ...

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medpagetodayFrom MedPage Today:

  1. Time to Retire Lithotripsy for Kidney Stones? More than 30 years ago, extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) had a highly anticipated, much-ballyhooed introduction as a nonsurgical therapy for kidney stones. Obviating the need to cut the skin or insert a device into the body, ESWL would use acoustic shock waves to ...

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