I was surprised when I felt my body stiffen as I became aware that an iPhone had just been fiercely thrown in my direction. “I’m calling security,” shouted a distant voice in the background. “I want the 10 mg oxycodone pills! I am in 10/10 pain!” The patient shouted this to me as he abruptly got up, violently launched his phone in my direction and stomped toward the exit of the ...

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I recently asked, “Who’s to blame?” for patients not taking their medications and cited a couple of papers describing the poor state of medication adherence. I concluded nonadherence was a huge problem, and doctors failing to educate their patients was not a major cause. To support my contention that physicians are not the reason why patients do not take their medications as ordered I submit the following new information. A 
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Approximately 300-400 physicians commit suicide annually. Given that a typical doctor has about 2,300 patients under his or her care, that means more than a million Americans will lose a physician to suicide this year. In a study of six medical schools, almost seven percent of students said they had thought of ending their lives in the last two weeks. In another recent study, 29 percent ...

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I have written about talcum powder previously.  Indeed, I have not only opined on the slippery substance, but I am also a regular consumer of the product.  Talcum powder has become magic legal dust that brings forth zillions of dollars to those who have been attacked by the poisonous toxin. Just last year, I informed readers of $55 million and $72 million judgments to cancer victims who used powder against ...

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What is it like living in pain? Those of us who have ever experienced unremitting pain for months or years know that it is enveloping and all consuming. I struggled with intractable pain for several difficult years, and I am fortunate because my pain finally got better — what if your pain never did? That is a horrible reality millions of people are living in right now. The chronic pain population ...

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Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 54-year-old man is evaluated for a 4-month history of intermittent, nonprogressive solid-food dysphagia. He has a long-standing history of heartburn that has been well controlled with once-daily proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy for the past 5 years. Results of a screening colonoscopy 4 years ago were normal. ...

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STAT_LogoIt is easy to mock the ridiculous and potentially harmful health advice and product lines promoted by Gwyneth Paltrow and her team at Goop. Sleeping near healing crystals, lugging around jade eggs in the vagina, swilling moon juice, undergoing raw goat milk cleanses, dabbing on sex dust, and snapping photos of your aura are ...

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Dr. Leon Pedell on why doctors need to become pharmacologists. Courtesy of Before the Floors.

The WHO’s recent announcement of multi-drug resistant strains of gonorrhea raises the specter of a worldwide SuperClap Attack that even the Avengers couldn’t foil. It also comes as yet another ominous reminder of the perils of rampant and indiscriminate antibiotic use. There’s plenty of blame to spread around. True, here in the U.S., consumers can’t buy antibiotics over the counter, but that hasn’t kept physicians and other providers from over-prescribing them ...

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Antibiotics save lives, but antibiotics can have negative effects.  When patients have bacterial infections, we want to treat them to prevent complications of the bacterial infection, but not treat them for an excessive duration.  So we have a Goldilocks problem -- we want antibiotic duration to be just right -- neither too short or too long. Some clinical conditions have adequate research to define the Goldilocks duration.  Community acquired pneumonia only ...

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