So there is this guy from MIT or Harvard, or some other place where they teach our leaders how to lead, and his name is Jonathan Gruber. Mr. Gruber, it seems, was hired to consult with the Obama administration during the time the Affordable Care Act (ACA) was created because of his extensive expertise in designing the Massachusetts health care system. In recent weeks, people who don’t particularly like our ...

Read more...

A few months ago I assessed a patient with dementia.  I dutifully ordered the appropriate blood testing and MRI.  As I delved further into the history, I was concerned that there may be a component of depression. Pseudodementia (memory disturbance and dementia like symptoms caused by depression) can often mimic classic Alzheimer’s disease, but resolves with proper treatment.  The best way to differentiate these two syndromes is neuropsychological testing.  I decided to send my patient to a colleague ...

Read more...

One of the most subtle deceptions hidden inside the cracks of our sick care system is the lie told to doctors: that health is our primary goal for our patients. I began to understand this paradox clearly when I listened to my friend’s anguish. She’s been working as a full-time medical assistant in a busy nephrology practice, supporting two sometimes three full-time sub-specialty doctors. The practice is located in a small town ...

Read more...

CMS recently announced it would begin next January to pay physicians for care coordination activities. It’s about time. As physicians have been saying for some time, any payment system that hopes to encourage value (better patient outcomes) has to start by paying physicians to coordinate the care of their patients.  When physicians follow up on referrals or communicate with patients outside of the office, healthoutcomes improve, costs shrink and the patient ...

Read more...

Regulations are changing the very heart of medicine You treat a disease: you win, you lose. You treat a person, I guarantee you win - no matter the outcome. - Patch Adams Health care reform sounds like a great idea, in theory. Get more people the access they need. Improve the quality of health care provided. Get doctors on electronic health records so they can more easily coordinate care between specialists. ...

Read more...

It is well known that Medicare expenditures threaten the financial solvency of the U.S. government. And it is pretty well agreed upon that some of our Medicare spending goes towards wasteful medical care. But which medical care is wasteful and how much is such care costing us?  A study in JAMA Internal Medicine provides a sneak peek at answers to these important questions. The research, led by Aaron Schwartz, a graduate student ...

Read more...

We have heard ad nauseum that the data collection mandated by Medicare and Medicaid is to improve quality of care. Significant taxpayer dollars have been expended as bonuses in the name of PQRS (Physician Quality Reporting System). With all this investment and mandating, one would assume that the PQRS must be highly indicative of better quality of patient care, right? Not so fast. Two recent reports demonstrate how ineffective this program is and how much ...

Read more...

Training doctors is no easy task. After medical school, newly minted doctors enroll in residency programs at various hospitals throughout the country for a length of 3 to 8 years, depending on their specialty. Some specialties, like family medicine, are even considering adding another year to the process. Resident physicians spend this time working long, arduous hours under their attending physicians, learning the clinical intricacies of their specialties that could not ...

Read more...

Medicare punishes hospitals for taking care of poor people Such a no-brainer: If patients who receive care at hospital A are more likely to get readmitted to the hospital 10, 20 or 30 days after discharge than patients in hospital B, then hospital A must be doing something wrong. Perhaps clinicians at that hospital are less adept at diagnosing and managing patients’ problems. Perhaps the follow-up care at hospital A ...

Read more...

It used to be that the greatest cost at a doctor’s visit was paying for the visit itself. Nowadays, the office visit is just a drop in the bucket compared to what medications cost. Medication costs were already starting to rise, but have risen to unprecedented levels since Medicare Part D became law about a decade ago and with the latest government attempt to help with the un-Affordable Care Act. In the last few ...

Read more...

90 Pages

Most Popular