Upon starting medical school, I remember feeling amazed to learn just how many of my classmates had physician parents. I felt like I was in the minority, not having any family members of my own who were doctors. This made me realize: Physician parents tend to breed physician children. But why? I soon discovered that the answer may lie in the genetics of personality. The academic study of personality has grown extensively over ...

Read more...

Medical couples are experts at delaying gratification. Medical school’s rigid, unpredictable, and demanding schedule forces couples to postpone vacations, outings, dinner plans, and relationship progress. Glen Gabbard and Roy Menninger, in their book Medical Marriages, call this common trend among single- and dual-physician couples “the psychology of postponement.” They explain that medical school and demanding attending physicians become “a convenient scapegoat” for couples looking to avoid living their lives or ...

Read more...

"I can't find the fetal heart tones." The nurse states with a tone of underlying panic as she exits the patient room. It's around 7 a.m., and those of us working the night shift are getting ready for morning sign out before we can head home and get some much-needed sleep after a crazy 14 hours shift. "Tessa, go scan her" the resident nods towards the ultrasound machine, and I cheerfully follow ...

Read more...

From the moment I entered medical school, I have been viewed as dollar signs by many individuals.  Every medical student is visualized this way.  Let’s start from the beginning. Most medical students come from humble beginnings.  My father is a bluegrass musician, and my parents couldn’t pay for my medical school.  So I had to take out loans.  This was the same situation for the vast majority of my friends.  In ...

Read more...

Ten male students crowded around a clean-shaven instructor who asked a series of questions.  The students had meticulously prepared and would maintain close proximity to well-rehearsed answers. "Hopefully, the questions are simple," they thought. One by one, they answered, at times stumbling through their responses. This was expected. The students were learning and the incorrect answers allowed room for humility. Such a scene could easily describe an American teaching hospital, ...

Read more...

"A doctor’s mission should not be just to prevent death, but to improve the quality of life. You treat a disease, you win-you lose. You treat a person, I guarantee you’ll win, no matter what the outcome.” – Patch Adams (1998) It’s that time of year where everyone begins residency applications, and you commonly hear conversations along the lines of, "What are you going into?", or, "what type of doctor are you ...

Read more...

Dear Pamela, Let me start off by telling you that I am a warrior, a protector, and a healer. I am an Army veteran. I’ve worked as an EMT, completed a bachelor's degree and two years of medical school, plus I’m raising a family. I’ve achieved amazing things, but I have never been defeated like I’ve been over these past few years. Honestly, I was less stressed in Afghanistan. Medical school is ...

Read more...

To my younger self, I remember how excited you were when you finally settled on medicine as the thing that you wanted to do as a career in your junior year of college. I remember all the questions you had about what the process entailed since no one in your family had undertaken this journey before. I even remember some of the doubts you had when you thought about how long ...

Read more...

Many recent articles, blogs, and presentations have focused on what American health care lacks and what additional skills health care professionals should adopt to “fix” our “broken” system. Third-party payers and health care organizations tend to promote the need for quality improvement and economic measures, while clinicians grapple with their transition to less-autonomous employees, noting increased job dissatisfaction and conflicts regarding administration and reimbursements. The theme that American health care ...

Read more...

As first year came to an end, we were asked to reflect on our experiences thus far. The multitude of tests and memorized facts, anatomy dissections, and patient interactions flooded my mind. Shockingly, it was not the difficulty of the first year of medical school that I will remember the most, rather the jaded comments from physicians and students that attempted to cloud my perspective of medicine. “Medicine is different now. ...

Read more...

126 Pages

Most Popular