From MedPage Today:

  1. Should Doc Groups Help Set Quality Measures? Physician groups are proud of a provision in recent legislation that repeals Medicare's doctor payment formula which allows specialty societies to help set quality measures.
  2. Teens Likely to Get Opioid Rx for Headaches. Nearly half of teens who visit a doctor complaining of headache pain walk away with a prescription for a narcotic painkiller.

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From MedPage Today:

  1. Scleroderma Survival Tied to Lung Problems. Survival among patients with scleroderma was strongly influenced by the development of major pulmonary involvement.
  2. HIV Tx Tied to Low Infection From Sex. Serodiscordant couples who engage in unprotected sexual intercourse have a very small risk of transmitting HIV if the infected partner is well treated with suppressive antiretroviral therapy.
  3. Xolair Makes Milk ...

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One aspect of the endless vaccine debate is the aspect of coercion some parents feel about requiring children to be vaccinated before they can go to school. The government mandates vaccination. But this isn’t really an absolute requirement. Although all 50 states ostensibly require vaccination, all but 2  (Mississippi and West Virginia) allow parents to opt out for religious reasons, and 19 states allow this for philosophical reasons. (See 
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From MedPage Today:

  1. All-Oral HCV Regimen Works in 9 Out of 10. An all-oral, 12-week regimen appears to successfully treat hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in about 90% of patients.
  2. CDC's Frieden to Docs: Dial Back Antibiotic Rx. Doctors in some hospitals are prescribing three times more antibiotics than physicians treating similar patients in other institutions.
  3. Anger Is Fast Trigger for Heart ...

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From MedPage Today:

  1. A Targeted Treatment for Scleroderma? A monoclonal antibody that binds to the type 1 interferon-alpha receptor showed an acceptable safety profile in a phase I trial for systemic sclerosis, but efficacy was less clear.
  2. CMS: More 'Meaningful Use' Exemptions Coming. Some healthcare providers struggling to meet the second stage of the incentive program for electronic health records (EHRs) may receive a ...

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Over the last decade, researchers, doctors and the life-sciences industry have made great strides in treating HIV. Medications once routinely delivered through complicated multidose cocktails are now, for some patients, available in a one-pill-a-day form. While adhering to even a once-daily regimen is still a challenge, significant progress on the treatment of HIV is undeniable. On the prevention front, however, there’s still work to be done. Despite a significant public-education campaign ...

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From MedPage Today:

  1. Driving High on List for Stroke Survivors. Stroke survivors seldom seek formal evaluation of readiness to get back behind the wheel, even if they have significant limitations in other daily activities.
  2. Viral Infection May Dull Mind. Mental sharpness appeared dulled with a history of exposure to five common viruses, with a possible signal for faster cognitive decline as well.

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There is little doubt that over the next few years we will see a wave of increasingly sophisticated point-of-care tools to help clinicians determine the costs and relative value of their medical recommendations. I welcome that day, but I do not intend to idly sit by waiting for it. Not all solutions need to be based on high-level algorithms or slick, user-friendly apps made for iPhones. Last month I came across a ...

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From MedPage Today:

  1. ICD-10 Follies: Transition Could Cost Practices Big Bucks. Transitioning to the new ICD-10 coding system could cost some physician practices millions of dollars.
  2. Fix Narrow Networks, ACP Tells HHS. The federal government, states, and health insurance companies should take a harder stance on expanding unduly narrow provider networks, the American College of Physicians (ACP) wrote to the government Tuesday.

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From MedPage Today:

  1. Mammography: Study Finds No Lives Saved. Annual mammography failed to reduce breast cancer mortality in women, ages 40 to 59, compared with physical examination or routine care, according to 25-year follow-up data from a Canadian screening program.
  2. Gestational Hypertension: Monitoring vs Delivery? Pregnant women with nonsevere hypertensive disorders between 34-37 weeks should be monitored closely rather than delivered immediately to avoid ...

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