ZDoggMD was a hospitalist in a past life, so he knows all about hospital readmissions.  Here are his R&B stylings on the ridiculousness surrounding the issue.

shutterstock_99727790 It could be the title of a new prime time show (maybe it should be): The Great Discharge Paperwork Makeover. Assemble a group of bright and creative minds from across the country and put them together in an exotic location for a week to talk about something that will affect all of us one day -- either ourselves or a relative. ...

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“Dr. Vashist, I’m sorry to bother but you really need to look at this medication being taken by our patient.” My hospital pharmacist gently prodded me as he handed over the patient’s medication list along with cost information and side-effects of the offending medication. The issue with the list was a subcutaneous injectable form of calcitonin, Miacalcin, costing approximately $11,300 per day of treatment. The patient had been admitted about 11 days back ...

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shutterstock_178086407 He sat there holding his wife’s hands and hugging her as tightly as he possibly could.  Tears were streaming down her face, and she was vulnerable to the diagnosis I had just bestowed upon her. Cancer, the “C” letter word nobody wanted to hear, suddenly invaded the lives of this newly married couple. Multiple thoughts were running through my mind before bestowing ...

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My 85-year-old patient was brought in from home. She was cachectic, contracted, minimally responsive to questions, covered in multiple decubitus ulcers on both hips, both knees, both shoulders, and her sacrum. She had polymicrobial sepsis-bacteremic with two different organisms. She was, in fact, dying. Despite her profoundly debilitated condition, her son, who cared for her at home wanted “everything” done. So she was placed on IV fluids, antibiotics, received an ...

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Going into my final few months of residency, I am somewhat puzzled knowing that so many of my colleagues are signing contracts with hospital-owned outpatient practices or are going into subspecialist fellowship training or have plans to work as a hospitalist. As someone who plans to go into solo private practice, I feel like an outlier. Yes, I know what you might be thinking. Who goes into solo practice these days ...

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Our specialty of hospital medicine has grown exponentially over the last decade and now finds itself at the forefront of American medicine. I’m proud to be part of such a growing movement and must say that I find the job just as rewarding as when I first became an attending physician when the specialty was still in its fledgling stage. As the number of us soars towards the 50,000 mark, the ...

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I came to hospital medicine from the land of pulmonary-critical care. I had spent ten years dealing with septic shock, respiratory failure, and acute renal failure. I had intubated, withdrawn life support, placed central lines, performed thoracenteses, and even placed a couple of chest tubes. I had changed tracheostomy tubes; I ran codes. In short I was a critical care bad ass. I thought I was hot stuff. But I ...

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Significant snow in New England every winter is about as certain as sun in Florida every summer. When I moved to the USA from the south of (old) England to do my medical residency in Maryland, my first few years living in the United States were relatively snow-free. But when I started my first job as an attending physician in central Massachusetts, I was in for a big shock. I had ...

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shutterstock_258407336 With the endless appearance of medical malpractice solutions in the press, any reader would think we have the answers to the logjam -- but no will to implement them.  If you follow the topic, you know every proposal has flaws and limited applications as they relate to individual states or delivery systems. The worst offender seems to be safe harbor protections (i.e., “follow the ...

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