As most everyone knows, medicine is not an exact science. Every patient and every family must be treated individually. We all recognize that many things have the possibility of not going perfectly, especially when an ill child presents to the hospital. I am lucky enough to be a part of many families’ experiences at the hospital that go so well that you want to tell people about them. Goodness knows, there ...

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Adverse events -- when bad things happen to patients because of what we as medical professionals do -- are a leading cause of suffering and death in the U.S. and globally.  Indeed, as I have written before, patient safety is a major issue in American health care, and one that has gotten far too little attention. Tens of thousands of Americans die needlessly because of preventable infections, medication errors, surgical ...

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When I was a boy, my dream was to become an airline pilot. The job seemed glamorous and exciting, and appeared to be held in high regard by all the people around me. I actually used to have a bit of an obsession with airplanes, and living so close to Heathrow Airport, had plenty of opportunities to see planes and visit the airport: both as a passenger and whenever we ...

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Over the last few years I’ve had numerous encounters with vets and vet hospitals. Domino, the dog that we had since I was in medical school, was sadly very sick. He was a Jack Russell-Corgi cross, black and white, with the loveliest sweetest nature. He lived till almost 13-years-old, bringing an immense amount of joy to our whole family. Sadly, he passed away last summer. My parents felt a huge ...

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In an effort to promote transparency in healthcare, the Association of Health Care Journalists (AHCJ) has published a database of recent hospital deficiencies discovered by Medicare and Medicaid  inspectors. They then highlighted 168 reports containing the phrase “immediate jeopardy.” This, of course, piqued my interest as I presumed that hospitals who were putting putting patients in “immediate jeopardy” must be some pretty bad actors. After sifting through the hospital names, I ...

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Imagine this:  You are sick.  You are the sickest you’ve ever been.  You want to die.  You almost did die.  You want to bury your head in your cozy bed for the next two years. But you’re not in your bed.  This bed has plastic for covers and sandpaper for sheets.  You need to throw up every thirty minutes but you have to share a bathroom with someone you don’t know, ...

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All of the focus that CMS is putting on hospital readmissions via the Readmissions Reduction Program, and the financial penalties that readmissions can generate, is causing hospital administrators to look to the emergency department and emergency physicians to intervene and resolve the issues that interrupt recovery for post-hospitalization patients. In today’s world of budget-constrained financing of government health care programs and narrow hospital margins, the question of how best to ...

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As the VA scandal unfolds, with continued revelations of secret waitlists and delayed or denied medical care, calls have been building Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric Shinseki to resign. He did just that, resigning because, “He had become a distraction as the department struggles.” President Obama, eager to show America that he was being proactive about the scandal, regretfully accepted the General’s resignation. But other than allowing the president to show that he is doing something about ...

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When the Joint Commission is at the hospital, leave Here’s a doctor’s health tip for patients that I’ll bet you haven’t heard before. If you’re a patient who walks into a hospital for an elective procedure of any kind -- surgery, or a diagnostic test -- and you find out that Joint Commission reviewers are on site, reschedule your procedure and leave. Come back another day, after the reviewers have left. Why? ...

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Should doctors be paid overtime for taking call? Taking call is the worst thing about being a doctor. There, I said it. But wait! What about medical malpractice lawsuits? What about dealing with patients’ suffering or dying either from their illness, or far worse, relating to decisions you made or procedures your performed? Certainly these are far worse events than being on call. Granted. However, these awful events are part of ...

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