I covered one of the chief residents in our hospital for two days recently, seeing more than 40 patients in total. My off-the-cuff remarks on Facebook still apply: “Twenty-two inpatients later, it is time once again to declare my awe and admiration for all who do this work daily: hospitalists, housestaff, nurses, techs, custodial staff (et al., et al.). And, of course, the patients who are -- on the other side ...

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Earlier this year, I completed a medical rotation in Africa. It was an amazing, eye-opening experience. While I expected it might be difficult to acquire newer, more expensive medications and procedures, I had anticipated that, given limited resources, there would be some rationale in deciding which medications and procedures would be available. I was deeply mistaken in this assumption. During my time abroad, I watched several patients with heart attacks pass ...

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Hospital medicine has rapidly become one of the largest specialties in the United States. As the number of practicing hospital medicine doctors soars above the 30,000 mark and health care reform takes hold, the specialty finds itself at the forefront of American medicine. And for good reason. It is a young, dynamic, varied and flexible specialty that can be practiced in a number of different settings. Hospital medicine doctors are ...

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Where I’m from, you can have someone killed for $5000.  I will do it for $1110. I’m a hand surgeon. I practice (or practiced, by the time you read this) in an area that is what we often refer to as “underserved.”   Rather, the area isn’t, but the people I treat are.  I work in a large urban referral center that has a very high proportion of Medicaid as well as ...

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There are words in many languages that have no good English equivalent. During my work in Haiti, I’ve noticed my Haitian colleagues on occasion exhaling a phrase -- “tet chaje” -- which literally means “head charged.” More accurately, it describes a sense of being overwhelmed or conveying disbelief or frustration. Based on my limited experiences in the field, I can only begin to imagine the burnout that local providers face ...

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A version of column was published on March 5, 2014 in the New York Times’ Room for Debate blog. To remedy our fragmented health system, reformers want to consolidate health care.  President Obama, for instance, has praised integrated health systems like the Mayo Clinic as a model for national reform.  To that end, the Affordable Care Act drives more hospitals to become more Mayo-like by purchasing physician practices.  Today, about 39% ...

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The New England Journal of Medicine recently published an article by David Reuben, MD and Mary Tinetti, MD, both academic gerontologists, about patients who are unable to stay out of the hospital. The two physicians study the problems of old people, and are of the opinion that most of these "hospital dependent" patients are elderly. Certainly some of them are, but in my experience a surprising number are just chronically ill, ...

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What affects hospital CEO pay the most: Patient satisfaction Dan Diamond (@ddiamond) tweeted this slide from a lecture by Harvard’s Ashish K. Jha at this year’s Association for Healthcare Journalist’s Annual Meeting in Denver. The slide shows how CEO incomes are affected by different variables and contains a few interesting tidbits of information. First, hospital CEOs earn around $600,000. Far more than most physicians. Second, hospital CEO salaries are not significantly affected by multiple ...

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Let's talk internal medicine maintenance of certification (MOC). I recertified back in 2011, and it was an onerous process capped off with a challenging exam.  Thankfully I passed, and I'm good until 2022. Since then, the American Board of Internal Medicine has made maintenance of certification a more "continuous" process, and is sparking some outcry among physicians.  Wes Fisher has multiple posts on his site ...

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The Cayman Islands are nestled in the Caribbean Sea some 430 miles south of Miami. The three-island cluster is known for its inviting coral-sand beaches, laid-back island culture and tax-free status. While it lures many tourists and big banks, it’s not the first place you’d expect to find the future of American health care. That may change soon. Last month, I flew to the Caymans to moderate an afternoon-long panel on delivering ...

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