Uncle Walt died this morning. Finally. I say "finally" because I believed this day would come four months ago, when he had emergency bypass surgery. At the time, I didn't believe Walt would live; he was an ailing, seventy-seven-year-old man with severe pulmonary disease. When his heart started to hurt one Friday, his doctors told him, "With bypass surgery, you might live. Without it, you'll be dead before the weekend is over." Walt's ...

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Ms. Smith (name changed) is 82-years-old, but currently looks about a hundred. I met her, intubated, in the ICU two weeks ago. She lived alone, hadn't told family she wasn't feeling well, but had called 911. In the emergency department, she was struggling to breath, and was intubated, having gone into respiratory failure. She was found to have a severe pneumonia affecting the majority of both her lungs. She also went ...

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Recently, CVS Caremark announced that starting October 1, they will no longer be selling tobacco products, including cigarettes, in their CVS stores. Taking a bold and unexpected stance on the issue, CVS’s CEO Larry Merlo reasoned to ABC News that “We’ve come to the conclusion that cigarettes have no place in a setting where health care is being delivered.” What does he mean by that? Here, he is referring to ...

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10 things to know about anesthesia and heart surgeryA guest column by the American Society of Anesthesiologists, exclusive to KevinMD.com. February is American Heart Month. Unfortunately, heart disease is a major problem in the United States that can result in surgery. In addition to discussing your procedure with your surgeon, you want to be sure to discuss your anesthesia care with your physician anesthesiologist. Here are 10 ...

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By now the world has heard the remarkable news. CVS Caremark will no longer be selling its tobacco products in any of its stores.  Locked and loaded with the news, the American Heart Association, American College of Cardiologists, local public health experts, Phillip Morris, and even the former-smoking president of the United States was quick to applaud the news by publishing press releases. But when press releases and major announcements of ...

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From MedPage Today:

  1. Driving High on List for Stroke Survivors. Stroke survivors seldom seek formal evaluation of readiness to get back behind the wheel, even if they have significant limitations in other daily activities.
  2. Viral Infection May Dull Mind. Mental sharpness appeared dulled with a history of exposure to five common viruses, with a possible signal for faster cognitive decline as well.

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From MedPage Today:

  1. ICD-10 Follies: Transition Could Cost Practices Big Bucks. Transitioning to the new ICD-10 coding system could cost some physician practices millions of dollars.
  2. Fix Narrow Networks, ACP Tells HHS. The federal government, states, and health insurance companies should take a harder stance on expanding unduly narrow provider networks, the American College of Physicians (ACP) wrote to the government Tuesday.

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From MedPage Today:

  1. Blacks Lag on HIV Continuum of Care. Fewer than half of the 500,000 black Americans living with HIV have been given a prescription for antiretroviral medications, and only about a third have suppressed the virus.
  2. 12 Things to Know About the SGR Repeal Bill. Democratic and Republican leaders in both houses of Congress have finally agreed on a bill that would ...

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In medicine today diagnostic testing and advanced imaging is readily available and widely utilized in most every clinical setting.  Many physicians have given up the stethoscope and physical exam in favor of an echocardiogram and a CT scan.  Fear of missing something pervades every emergency department and has resulted in hundreds of thousands of unnecessary testing costing billions of dollars in healthcare expenditures. Of course, the driving causes of increased testing ...

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Cardiologists are causing patients to get cancer. It’s true. Cardiologists routinely perform angiograms on patients who have no heart disease whatsoever. As shown in this Harvard newsletter, each angiogram exposes the patients to about 7 mSv of radiation. Add in the myocardial perfusion imaging at another 25 mSv of radiation and you have enough radiation to cause cancer in an otherwise healthy individual. And cardiologists routinely subject patients with normal coronary arteries ...

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