Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 58-year-old man is evaluated during a routine appointment. He is asymptomatic. He was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus 4 years ago and has hypertension, dyslipidemia, and obesity. His medications are enteric-coated low-dose aspirin, lisinopril, fluvastatin (20 mg/d), and metformin. His calculated 10-year risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) using the Pooled ...

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Meet the courageous doctor who shoved a catheter all the way up his arm and into his own heart to prove that cardiac catheterization in a live human being was possible.  Produced by Fusion.

Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 33-year-old woman is evaluated as an outpatient following an episode of atrial fibrillation. The episode resolved shortly after she arrived at the emergency department. She has a history of tetralogy of Fallot with repair performed at the age of 4 years. On physical examination, blood pressure is 110/70 mm Hg, pulse rate ...

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The doctor sprinted to the side of the bed and slapped her interlaced hands over the man’s heart.  What made his heart stop remained a mystery, but she knew she had to get it beating again. She pushed her hands into his chest, an internal metronome pacing her efforts. After every few pumps, she glanced up at the cardiac monitor. Still no pulse. “Well, it’s obvious why he’s dying, isn’t it?” ...

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Mr. J was as close to a typical sixty-year-old patient as possible, wary of doctors and selective in when he took his blood pressure medications. On a sunny Thursday, he woke up nauseated and called an ambulance. During evaluation in the emergency room, his blood pressures reached atmospheric levels (nearly 300 systolic). He began seizing, which soon stopped and was transferred to the ICU. As the admitting resident, I dutifully ...

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There were several news stories recently that reported that Pfizer had abandoned its efforts to have its Lipitor brand of atorvastatin made available over the counter (OTC), without a prescription. I was never a big fan of OTC statins, but I was struck by the reason that Pfizer put out:

The study did not meet its primary objectives of demonstrating patient compliance with the direction to check their low-density lipoprotein cholesterol ...

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shutterstock_180109973 There has been concern for several years about commonly prescribed antacid drugs called proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and the heart.  PPIs are used to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), peptic ulcer disease, and other acid-related diseases.  Common drugs in the PPI class are omeprazole (Prilosec), esomeprazole (Nexium), pantoprazole (Protonix), lansoprazole (Prevacid), and dexlansoprazole (Dexilant), among others. Specifically, there is a potential interaction ...

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Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 60-year-old asymptomatic man is evaluated during a routine examination. He has a long history of heart murmur. With normal daily activities, he has not experienced shortness of breath, chest discomfort, or palpitations. Blood pressure is 138/78 mm Hg, pulse rate is 82/min and regular, and respiration rate is 16/min. BMI is 27. ...

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How does heartburn turn into a multi-thousand dollar workup?  The simple answer: defensive medicine.  See how this scenario plays out daily in this latest episode from Healthcare Not Fair.

shutterstock_198931019 "Turn out the light, the party's over," sang color commentator Dandy Don Meredith on ABC's Monday Night Football when a seminal fourth quarter play occurred and the game was suddenly in the bag. For me, that's where it's at right now -- just a few ticks of the clock away First, for the American Heart Association then for the American Red Cross, ...

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