There was a time when doctors were doctors There was a time when doctors were doctors. There was a time when young men and women sacrificed the best years of their youth, learning to treat patients and conquer diseases, not to become typists, paper pushers, data-entry clerks, or to have hospitals, insurance companies, and the federal government dictate to us how to practice medicine. There was a time when doctors were ...

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Chinese hospitals are recruiting 1,500 “guardian angels” to protect doctors from violent patient attacks. Patients who are angry about the Chinese health care system, medical expenses, long waiting times, and uncaring doctors have become more violent over the years, with violent attacks occurring every two weeks on average -- according to state media -- which in reality means that it probably occurs a lot more frequently than twice ...

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As an income-less medical student, I would be one of the now 7.1 million people who have signed up for Obamacare for this year. Except I live in Texas, one of nearly half of all states that elected to not expand Medicaid. At the same time, I don’t have enough of an income to qualify for federal subsidies, making insurance from the Marketplace unaffordable. As such, the individual mandate -- the ...

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With American health care in the midst of rapid transformation, both doctors and patients will be forced to adapt to changes stemming from the Affordable Care Act, also known as “Obamacare.” Of course, everyone responds to change differently. But is it possible to predict how doctors will adapt to health care reform based on the year they were born? The answer may surprise some patients and even force them to think differently ...

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Politics in the US is discouragingly partisan. National politics has become increasingly partisan since at least the late ’60s, when the passage of civil rights legislation influenced many conservative southern Democrats to join the Republican Party. Even state politics has become more partisan, where even famously nice people in Wisconsin have found themselves battling their neighbors across political divisions. Fortunately, most of life does not force us to confront our political differences, meaning ...

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Doctor: “Phil, you have pneumonia.” Phil: “Oh noes. What shall I do?” Doctor: “Just take these red pills, here.” Phil: “Great! I feel better already! When can I go back to work?” Doctor: “I think in about 2 weeks. Or maybe 2 months. And actually, don’t take those red pills -- these blue ones are better. It could take a few years for you to get better, and I’ll be retired by then. Here, ...

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The janitor approached my office manager with a very worried expression.  "Uh, Brenda ..." he said, hesitantly. "Yes?" she replied, wondering what janitorial emergency was looming in her near future. "Uh ...well ... I was cleaning Dr. Lamberts' office yesterday and I noticed on his computer ..."  He cleared his throat nervously, "Uh ... his computer had something on it." "Something on his computer? You mean on top of the computer, or on ...

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Whenever a discussion of health care policy is initiated, the importance of health insurance, of extending coverage, takes center stage. The need for insurance quickly becomes an undeniable truth, a universal imperative. And no one ever seems to question this subtle premise before getting more patients fitted with shiny, new policies. This was precisely the case with the Affordable Care Act. My question, however, is simple. Where is the evidence that ...

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With the rollout of Obamacare, we are living in a moment in which there is no dearth of heated debates among friends, family, and co-workers. And often times, these debates degrade to become emotion vs. emotion, or even ad hominem, and so these initially well-meaning conversations morph into heated arguments that lead nowhere. (Even Immanuel Kant advised debaters to out-shout opponents when more civil methods of discourse had failed.) It is far ...

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A version of column was published on March 5, 2014 in the New York Times’ Room for Debate blog. To remedy our fragmented health system, reformers want to consolidate health care.  President Obama, for instance, has praised integrated health systems like the Mayo Clinic as a model for national reform.  To that end, the Affordable Care Act drives more hospitals to become more Mayo-like by purchasing physician practices.  Today, about 39% ...

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