Sometimes, after crafting an important or complex plan of care with a patient, I say: “Let me type all this into the computer so that, in case I run into that big bull moose up on Vaillancourt Hill on my way home tonight, the next doctor who sees you will know what we were thinking today.” Patients sometimes squirm or laugh nervously at that, but then they usually indicate understanding and ...

Read more...

As medical providers, we recognize the value and importance of emergency medical identification (EMI), especially for our patients who live with chronic medical conditions, such as diabetes, epilepsy, and severe allergies. Of particular concern are those who may require emergency care during a time when they are unable to communicate, but how often do we address this topic with our patients, and do they really listen? Health care professionals have long recommended that such patients obtain emergency medical identification, such as MedicAlert jewelry (bracelet, ...

Read more...

shutterstock_117726904 I suppose it is obvious that I am a fan of stories. I like to hear them, read them, watch them, collect them and tell them. I believe I am participating in stories every day of my life. The story of my family is a beautiful epic. The stories I hear at work can break my heart. One of my favorite ...

Read more...

shutterstock_233430226 Where does doctor stop and computer begin? Who is in charge? Do we care? Are these silly, academic questions from some sci-fi future or is it an onrushing tomorrow? Consider:

  • Ten years ago, the EMR recorded the date you or your nurse gave Sam his flu shot.
  • Today, the EMR reminds you it is time to have your nurse give Sam his flu shot.
  • Soon, the EMR will order the flu ...

    Read more...

shutterstock_186139613 Right now, there are two patients in every room. One is made with flesh, bones, and blood. One is made with a monitor, a mouse, and a keyboard. Both demand my time. Both demand my concentration. A little over two weeks ago I wrote the short story "Please Choose One." I posted it online. The response it generated exceeded anything I could ...

Read more...

I am a clinician and a clinical trialist. Medical research in some form or another (performing it, consuming it, reviewing it, editing it, etc.) occupies much of my time. Therefore, you can imagine my excitement while watching Apple’s product announcement when they introduced a new open source software platform called ResearchKit. Apple states ResearchKit could “revolutionize medical studies, potentially transforming medicine forever.” ResearchKit allows clinical researchers to have data about various diseases ...

Read more...

Andy McAfee is the associate director of the Center for Digital Business at MIT’s Sloan School of Management. He is also coauthor (with his MIT colleague Erik Brynjolfsson) of the 2014 book, The Second Machine Age: Work, Progress, and Prosperity in a Time of Brilliant Technologies, one of my favorite books on technology. While he sits squarely in the camp of “technology optimists,” he is thoughtful, appreciates the downsides of IT, and ...

Read more...

shutterstock_224345509 I have a unique perspective as a physician. Having traveled to many hospitals in the past two years, working as a locums emergency physician, I can comment on a variety of issues with a reasonable amount of experience. One of those issues is EMR, or electronic medical records. I have spent plenty of time writing about this in the past, and I ...

Read more...

shutterstock_154083233 Please choose one: The three words blink in front of me on the computer screen. Please choose one: Patient is-Male     Female  I click FEMALE. I watch as the auto-template feature fills in the paragraph for me based on my choices. Patient #879302045 Patient is: 38-year-old female status post motor vehicle accident. Please acknowledge you have reviewed her allergies, medications, and past medical history. I click YES. Have you counseled her about smoking cessation? I click NO. A little, animated icon of a ...

Read more...

Despite the well-known rollout problems for hospitals and clinics across the nation, there are many palpable and welcome advantages to using electronic health records. Chief among these are the ability to access the chart from anywhere, rapidly search for information needed, and reducing the centuries-old problem of illegible doctors’ handwriting.  But with the good comes the bad, and in these still relatively early stages of health care information technology adoption -- ...

Read more...

Most Popular