From MedPage Today:

  1. Vitamin D's Role in Weight Loss. Simply supplementing vitamin D as part of a dietary intervention won't necessarily aid weight loss, unless patients actually achieve levels of 25 (OH)D of 32 ng/mL or more.
  2. Less Invasive Surgery Gets Hip Patients Behind Wheel Faster. Patients who undergo hip joint replacement surgery using minimally invasive techniques can safely return to driving 2 weeks ...

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Physicians and patients collaborate to treat symptoms. This is not newsworthy and even sounds appropriate. Isn’t that what doctors are trained to do? It is but I’m not sure this should be a central focus of our healing mission. Treating a symptom is not the same as treating a disease. For example, if an individual is having abdominal discomfort, pain medicine should not be the first responder, even if this would ...

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From MedPage Today:

  1. All-Oral HCV Regimen Works in 9 Out of 10. An all-oral, 12-week regimen appears to successfully treat hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in about 90% of patients.
  2. CDC's Frieden to Docs: Dial Back Antibiotic Rx. Doctors in some hospitals are prescribing three times more antibiotics than physicians treating similar patients in other institutions.
  3. Anger Is Fast Trigger for Heart ...

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March is colorectal cancer (CRC) awareness month, so it’s an appropriate time to reflect on how to increase the number of people who get screened for this cancer that’s largely preventable through screening. Between 2005 and 2012, Kaiser Permanente, Northern California, doubled the percentage of our eligible patients who were screened for CRC. So how did we do it? We employ a combined screening model with fecal immunochemical test (FIT) outreach and ...

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From MedPage Today:

  1. California Weighs Coverage for Illegal Immigrants. In a push to cover immigrants excluded from the nation's health reform law, a California state senator has proposed legislation that would offer health insurance for all Californians, including those living here illegally.
  2. Treating HCV -- Is the Price Right? New drugs on the horizon hold out the promise of being able to cure up ...

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In fall of 1994, I was sixteen years old and sick. I had lost a lot of weight, reduced my diet to BRAT and roast chicken, filled a half-dozen stool samples, even tried a few prescriptions -- and nothing seemed to help. By that point I was seeing a gastroenterologist, Dr. C. After a pointless barium enema and follow-through, Dr. C performed a colonoscopy. From that, he gave me a definitive ...

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Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 50-year-old man is evaluated for persistent heartburn and regurgitation despite taking a high-dose proton-pump inhibitor twice a day for 6 months. His symptoms have improved, but he continues to have symptoms many times a week. He has not had dysphagia, chest pain or weight loss. He has significantly modified his diet. ...

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In the medical world, when a physician, a scientist, a hospital, a drug company or a panel of experts issues a report, the games begin. If one agrees with the statement or benefits from it, then the report is heralded as breakthrough brilliance. If, however, the report suggests a new medical pathway that diminishes your relevance or reimbursement, then the report and its authors are regarded as misguided. Yes, I am ...

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Imagine a teenager with a chronic disease causing frequent diarrhea, upset stomach, and hospitalizations. Her doctor explained that she had a chronic condition called inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that she would have for the rest of her life. The fact that she has a chronic disease means that she will need to navigate a complex health care system that is expensive, has a lot of variation in the quality of ...

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Autonomy is a bedrock ethical principle in medicine that has supplanted medical paternalism.  Patients have a right to make their own medical decisions and are entitled to know the advantages and drawbacks of all reasonable options.  Clearly, informed consent cannot be given if the patient is only partially informed or has been given a slanted presentation by the physician. When a patient does not have the capacity to provide consent, then ...

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