Medicine, what a noble profession.  As the keepers of human health and longevity, we are entrusted with a huge but solemn responsibility.  It’s an ancient artwork, passed through the generations from pre-antiquity, hand in hand from physician to physician.  The Hippocratic oath ensuring that we first “do no harm” and commit ourselves to the honorable calling.  We often hear “see one, teach one, do one” and so propagates the training ...

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Monday night, at Lincoln Center waiting for Beethoven’s Ninth to begin. Masses of glass spatially dividing David Geffen Hall from the Metropolitan Opera, are still allowing for the majestic Viennese crystal chandeliers next door to provide the necessary visual interruption between the two symphonic masterpieces, Beethoven’s Eight and Ninth. For me, the excitement about this particular event is deeply personal: Ode to Joy became part of my classmates’, my friends’ collective ...

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I’m humbled by the honor to practice medicine.  We have the opportunity to be frontline participants in an ever evolving cascade of events in the lives of others.  Our decisions, directions, and split second actions have the ability to unite families, sustain breath or literally a beating heart.  Although biased, I can’t think of many professions more fulfilling and honorable.  There are issues and concerns, but they pale in comparison ...

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I’m probably crazy. I ride my motor scooter to and from work at the hospital. Some consider it unsafe. Perhaps it is, but feeling the wind and rain, those unfiltered elements. And after 12 hours inside a controlled environment, it's too refreshing to pass up. So at 2 a.m. Friday night, I'm zooming (you always "zoom" on a scooter) through the industrial district after a tiring admitting shift. I see ...

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"Mom, that's a little unreasonable,” piped up my 9-year-old from the backseat as we drove by an ER billboard that prominently displayed an average wait time of four minutes. “That would be stressful, seeing everyone that fast.” Even my kids understand how absurd some of today's time metrics are. “Hospitals probably make more money showing shorter wait times on a billboard because people want to go there because it's faster,” ...

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The ER doc sounded genuinely concerned, which is never a good sign. “Sixty-year-old guy, no real medical history, dude is seriously hallucinating. Head imaging is negative. Can you come take a look at him?” I flitted through the chart. A car accident a few years ago that left him with chronic, poorly controlled migraines. Depression, on Prozac and well controlled. That was pretty much it. I grabbed my stethoscope and ...

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It was around 2 p.m. when a 380-pound woman came into the ED. She was in her late 30s. The physician went to see her and then ordered IV fluids, some basic blood tests, and a urine sample. At a hospital, everyone’s job is made harder when a patient is obese. Getting the patient on the bed requires more personnel. Inserting an IV -- an intravenous catheter to infuse fluids or ...

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The boom in telemedicine is here, and understandably so.  The “consumer” is in control now, and they sure don’t want to be “patient” anymore.  When Americans want care, they want it cheap, and they want it now.   Telemedicine has grown to accommodate 7 million annual patient encounters, up from 350,000 five years ago.  What savvy health care administrator doesn’t see numbers like that and get dollar signs in ...

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In this podcast, I share insights from a doc who barely survived his suicide attempt plus simple ways to prevent the next suicide. Listen in. You may save a life. Dear Pamela, I’ve never been so happy to fail at something in my life. Four weeks ago today I died. Cardiopulmonary arrest in jail. Why was I in jail? My wife alerted ...

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Gather round kids! Let Grandpa Doctor Leap tell you a few things about the old days of doctoring in the emergency room: Back in the good old days, medicine was what we liked to call "fun." Not because it was fun to see people get sick or hurt or die, but because we were supposed to do our best and people didn’t wring their hands all the time about rules and ...

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