We owe it to our patients to put on our game faces When you walk into the emergency room to see a trauma patient, do you remind yourself as you enter the doors, “Keep your game face on?” When you finish a difficult surgery and make your way to the waiting area to review the prognosis with the family, do you tell yourself, “Take a deep breath. You can do this?” When you steel yourself ...

Read more...

The religion of emergency medicine: Its time for a reformation Emergency medicine, like every specialty, is its own religion. And on many levels, it tracks right along with the progression of religions from their ancient origins to their modern incarnations. Our unique profession grew out of a pressing need for physicians who could provide immediate and life-saving care to the sick and injured, at all hours of the day or night. The ...

Read more...

Imagine you walk into a restaurant named Luigi’s. From the décor and the smell of pasta sauce coming from the kitchen, you assume that this restaurant serves Italian food. You walk forward, your name is taken and you are then told to sit off to the side and wait until your name is called so that you can get a table. Time goes by, and no one gives you any ...

Read more...

5 ways to ease the integration of NPs and PAs I talk a lot with different physicians about integrating NP/PA providers into their practice.  I am frequently astonished by the level of reluctance, resistance and downright animosity from these physicians.  Many times a doctor will have a medical “horror story” with the NP/PA  playing  the  villain.  One bad encounter or event seems to  justify a complete rejection of the many positive ...

Read more...

Among reams of coverage on the Ebola outbreak, Politico just published a characteristic story with the headline, “In the world of Ebola, no room for error.” The only problem is that is as soon as you introduce a human element to any system, there will be error. That’s the reality that health care leaders across the United States are grappling with now in a simultaneous effort both to tighten the health ...

Read more...

Ebola is frightening but not for the reason you may imagine. A little over a year ago Asiana Flight 214 crashed while landing at San Francisco International Airport resulting in 181 injuries and 3 deaths.  As an emergency medicine resident, this fast-forwarded my training as I took care of many of the patients arriving in our emergency department.  I left that day inspired that I had the education and training to ...

Read more...

Helicopter emergency services: A disparity between aviation and medical proficiency As the helicopter emergency services (HEMS) industry enters its fifth decade, there is an 800-pound gorilla in the room and nobody is talking.  The average EMT, fireman and emergency physician too often make the flawed assumption that when it comes to HEMS, the industry is a uniform, high quality, strictly regulated entity.  They assume that all HEMS programs use state of ...

Read more...

When treating neo Nazis, should physicians have a choice?What I found most disturbing about the man’s arm was not the deep, stellate laceration on the underside of his biceps. It was the swastika tattoo next to it. “Sir,” I said, “we’ll have you fixed up in no time. I’m going to numb up the wound, irrigate it, then repair the laceration with sutures and send you home on antibiotics and pain ...

Read more...

Go into any hospital today and notice that between every great nurse and patient sits a computer terminal. The quantified health movement has created the great digital divide, between the patient and everyone else. The nurse of old used to actually touch the patient. No more. Now, they wheel in a computer console, sit down and record the digital output of the wired up patient, every vital sign, every drug order or ...

Read more...

In June 2014, the first patient with Ebola arrived at Liberia’s county hospital, Redemption. As tensions grew around the city of Monrovia, administrators at JFK Hospital began to devise plans for handling patients with suspected Ebola. Officials from the CDC then came and gave us lectures. They discussed prevention of spreading and what our plans would be in the event of a potential outbreak. Before that moment, there were no ...

Read more...

121 Pages