by Doctor D, MD A teacher asks Doctor D about a diabetic teenager in his class: "His sugar readings are often over 400. His mom says this is normal. Can this be normal?" What is normal? a) A state of harmony within the body and mind that leads to health and well-being. b) The typical or status quo for a person; the way things usually are. c) WTF? There is no such ...

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When I was a family medicine intern, I met a diabetic patient in the hospital who had stopped seeing his regular doctor after he lost his job and his health insurance. His untreated diabetes made his feet go numb.  He stepped on a nail and didn't realize it until he noticed ...

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An excerpt from Feed Your Brain Lose Your Belly. by Larry McCleary, MD As diseases, memory loss and mood disorders appear to have very little in common. But could memory loss (even severe memory loss such as that which occurs in Alzheimer’s disease) and mood illnesses such as depression and bipolar disorder, actually be treated much the same ...

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What physician has not stifled a groan when a patient presents with a chief complaint of "I just don't feel right, Doc." About this time last year, I had that "not quite right" feeling and vague, seemingly unrelated symptoms ... sweating, mid-morning headaches, and frequent feelings of hunger, which I was accustomed to satisfying with a muffin. Like most people -- patients and clinicians alike -- I ignored these subtle signals. One evening, ...

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Do you use Facebook to look for health information? If you said "yes," and use social networking sites to research your health, you could be in the minority, or majority, depending on which study you read. Recently, a survey released by the ...

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With little notice, UnitedHealth released a major paper recently considering diabetes in America. First the bad news: a large portion of our population either has the disease or is pre-diabetic. Now, the really bad news: diabetes and pre-diabetes rates are going to soar in the coming decade, according to the analysis, in part driven by the obesity crisis. I’ll return back to the study in a moment, but it underscores a ...

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My mom doesn’t take any diabetes medicine.  She keeps her blood sugars normal through a combination of common sense and careful carbohydrate consumption. A few months ago, she had to be hospitalized for what she calls a “minor procedure.”  The procedure went fine, but not the food.  The first meal they brought her consisted of breaded fish (frozen), mashed potatoes (instant), corn (canned), a dinner roll (frozen), and tea (2 sugar ...

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The Dartmouth Atlas of Health is once again throwing a harsh spotlight on McAllen, Texas. This time the Mexican border town has the highest rate of leg amputations in the nation, a new report released recently showed. McAllen's rate was ten times the rate of Provo, Utah, which had the lowest rate of leg amputations among the Medicare eligible population. The national average was one-third of McAllen's rate. McAllen became notorious earlier ...

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Most of the illnesses that occur today are chronic like diabetes, heart disease, cancer or kidney disease. These stay with us for the rest of our lives, are debilitating, and are expensive to treat. But in many cases they are not all that difficult to prevent. Unfortunately, our dietary guidelines are of little or no help in this regard but could be. In 1941, following studies that demonstrated ...

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Though I am not going to say that the New York Times lied, they either purposely and grossly misrepresented the truth or did a horrible job of reporting. In their article, "Diabetes Drug Maker Hid Test Data, Files Indicate" the Times states that Avandia maker GSK "secretly began" a study which "provided clear signs that it (Avandia) was riskier to the heart." In fact, the study in question, called study ...

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