mayor menino Beloved and deeply respected Boston mayor Thomas M. Menino died on hospice in Brigham and Women’s Hospital recently.  Menino developed advanced cancer of unknown primary (CUP) in the spring of this year, and after six months of chemotherapy, he elected to stop active treatment.  Reportedly he was comfortable, and surrounded by friends and family at the time of his death.  The press, the ...

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Mrs. C was used to my quiet knock every morning at 6 a.m. She smiled as I turned on the overhead lights, but began to grimace when she realized that today was dressing-change day. The rustling packages of bandages in my overstuffed coat pockets had given it away. Mrs. C had stage four metastatic endometrial cancer; a malignancy of her uterus that was not responding well to chemotherapy and had ...

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asco-logo In July 1991, I was beginning my first year of medical school in Rochester, New York. I was filled with excitement and anxiety on beginning a journey in medicine as I started on the road to becoming a doctor. At that time, Rochester was in the national spotlight because of the actions of one of our faculty members, Timothy Quill. ...

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shutterstock_110958092 We sit, we listen, we attempt to focus and absorb what we are required to know. We learn how to give bad news, even using one another as makeshift “standardized” patients. How does one “standardize” a patient anyway? Who knows, who cares, time to cram for the endocrine exam. But what happens when you stop pretending? When you wake up one morning ...

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medpagetodayFrom MedPage Today:

  1. Ebola: Signs of Progress, CDC says. The response to the Ebola outbreak in Liberia is showing encouraging signs of progress, with downward trends in new cases especially in two regions of the country that had been hot spots.
  2. Millions Of Medicaid Kids Missing Regular Checkups. Millions of low-income children ...

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shutterstock_33798526 The alarm clock’s blast brings hours of work, running from task to task, always pushing toward the next turn.  In moments of failure, the waves of complexity and anxiety batter and you question each stroke. Then you fly downhill, easy breeze in your face, as success urges you on.  After the finish, the parking lot empties, the lights go out, and ...

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asco-logo I remember when I first started in oncology; I had joined the faculty at Brown three years after fellowship and was seeing a patient* with newly diagnosed breast cancer. She was in her 40s, an advertising executive, married, with two small kids. The diagnosis was unexpected (as it usually is), with a lump found while showering. She had come ...

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shutterstock_168939329 A few months ago I was paged by a medical student in the emergency room at ten o'clock. I had just changed my clothes, and before my pager went off my attention had been squarely fixed on the newest Jack Reacher novel. You can usually tell when someone is going to ask you to come into the hospital from home, because there ...

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brittany-maynard Would you base a life or death decision based on one doctor’s opinion? One research article? Google searches? What would it take? I recently read that Brittany Maynard took her own life. Plagued by glioblastoma, she chose to reject chemotherapy, radiation, and hospice. Tomorrow, I have a schedule packed with glioblastoma patients who personify courage, determination, and faith. Glioblastoma (GBM) ...

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shutterstock_179528855 Ironically, we had just finished our endocrine unit when I noticed a lump in my neck. Perhaps school had made me more vigilant, or perhaps I merely fell into the realm of hypochondriac medical student, but I couldn’t ignore this lump. I set up an appointment with my doctor fully expecting a diagnosis of medical student neuroticism. Instead she agreed that it was ...

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