Hegira: To take flight to escape.  To travel from a place of danger to a place of safety. “You have cancer.” You hear the words.  Your mind does not understand. “You have cancer.” Shock.  Distance.  Isolation.  Someone else.  A mistake.  A lie.  Bizarre, strange, you float above the room.  Everyone speaks; nothing is said. “You have cancer.” A fog-like curse, a venomous reality, a phantom idea.  A cold ghost foreign to the soul.  I must run. ...

Read more...

It was only a matter of time before the name Dr. Stanislaw Burzynski would grab the attention of the family of McKenzie Lowe, a 12-year-old from Hudson, N.H., with that most damning of diagnoses, a diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma,  an inoperable brain tumor with a median survival of less than a year. Like McKenzie, my own daughter was 12-years-old with a recurring brain tumor that had started to metastasize and ...

Read more...

Sometimes it seems that life is unfair and the odds are stacked incredibly against us.  More than 1 in 3 persons will get cancer.  The chance of survival if you get lung, pancreatic or brain tumors is pathetically small.  The most common cancer in 20 to 30-year-olds is the deadly beast melanoma. We have no easy or effective early detection for most cancers. However, there are remarkable stories of hope.  Here ...

Read more...

From MedPage Today:

  1. Diet Rich in Beans, Lentils, Peas Lowers LDL. People who consumed a serving a day of dietary "pulses" -- such as beans, chickpeas, lentils and peas -- significantly reduced their low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol.
  2. Dad's Extra Pounds Tied to Kid's Risk for Autism Disorders. Paternal obesity was strongly associated with increased risk for several autism spectrum disorders in children.

  3. Read more...

Can narrative medicine inform quality of care? As characterized by Dr. Rita Charon in her JAMA article almost 15 years ago, narrative medicine is “the ability to acknowledge, absorb, interpret, and act on the stories and plights of others.” It is the recognition that scientific knowledge alone is not enough -- not enough for our patients, for ourselves, and for society. It stresses the importance of not only hearing what our ...

Read more...

Dont forget those where cancer screening didnt make a differenceI had the opportunity recently to participate in a Twitter chat on the topic of colorectal cancer awareness. The chat was intended to bring attention to a nationwide campaign called "80 by 2018" designed to increase colorectal cancer screening rates to 80% of the population over the next 4 years. If it is successful, we should see a decline in both incidence ...

Read more...

Allow me to describe a recent case and ask your opinion.  Today, you are the intake nurse at hospice and you are asked to evaluate Stan.  This gentleman has incurable cancer, but treatment would probably prolong his survival.   However, Stan has refused that treatment and been referred to you.  It is your job to decide if he is “hospice appropriate.” Why has Stan refused therapy?  It is not that he denies ...

Read more...

I was working side-by-side with a Kenyan ENT doctor at his hospital in Eldoret, Kenya. My wife, Kathi, and I were part of a team of head and neck surgeons organized by Indiana University spending two weeks working with Kenyan ENT surgeons to help them build confidence to perform operations independently. In rapid sequence, we were seeing dozens of patients who had signed up to be examined and hoping to ...

Read more...

I was recently sent a link to this article entitled “Smile! You’ve Got Cancer” written by Barbara Ehrenreich.  I encourage everyone to read it. The article lives up to its striking title and more.  And I couldn’t help but respond with my perspective. So that you know where I’m coming from, my most personal encounter with cancer is that my grandmother died from cancer. I also treat people with acute ...

Read more...

“I’m so sorry, but it looks like the cancer has spread.” As I heard these words come out of my mouth, I knew that in a split second, a new reality was created in the mind of the patient that I was talking to. I looked at his face and saw that he was trying to remain strong, but in his demeanor, it was apparent that dreams were crushed and that ...

Read more...

143 Pages