From MedPage Today:

  1. Muscle Pain in the ED. Patients presenting to the emergency department with widespread muscle pain may have very low levels of vitamin D.
  2. Care of Cancer Survivors Often Falls Short. Most cancer patients enter survivorship with little direction from oncologists or primary care providers.
  3. MERS Cases Still Climbing. The number of cases of Middle East coronavirus (MERS-CoV) has topped ...

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7 steps to eliminating the war analogy in cancer careFrom a philosophical standpoint, one of the things I hate most about cancer is the use of “war” analogies. The “battle” may mobilize patients and families, but it may also interfere with education and informed decision making. And both patients and clinicians often take recurrence or disease progression personally as a failure. Even when everything is done perfectly, the outcomes aren’t. ...

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From MedPage Today:

  1. Sudden Cardiac Death Robs Many Years of Life. The burden of sudden cardiac death in terms of years of potential life lost is high compared with other leading causes of death in the U.S.
  2. HTN Guidance Takes Center Stage at NKF. Guidelines on hypertension management, particularly the JNC8 recommendations released last December, will be a major talking point at this year's ...

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From MedPage Today:

  1. Small Practices: Down but Not Out. Emily Briggs, MD, MPH, is all too familiar with the decline in small physician practices.
  2. IV Ketamine Rapidly Effective in PTSD. Patients with moderate to severe post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms showed rapid and substantial relief with a single intravenous dose of ketamine in a pilot randomized trial.
  3. Missed Doses Cripple Postop DVT ...

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I recently spoke to a class of undergraduates about the benefits, harms and politics of screening smokers for lung cancer using low-dose CT scans. Afterwards, a student asked how I felt about the Affordable Care Act's requirement that Medicare and private insurers cover U.S. Preventive Services Task Force "A" and "B" recommended screening tests and other preventive services without co-payments or deductibles, making them free at the point of care. I ...

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Hegira: To take flight to escape.  To travel from a place of danger to a place of safety. “You have cancer.” You hear the words.  Your mind does not understand. “You have cancer.” Shock.  Distance.  Isolation.  Someone else.  A mistake.  A lie.  Bizarre, strange, you float above the room.  Everyone speaks; nothing is said. “You have cancer.” A fog-like curse, a venomous reality, a phantom idea.  A cold ghost foreign to the soul.  I must run. ...

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It was only a matter of time before the name Dr. Stanislaw Burzynski would grab the attention of the family of McKenzie Lowe, a 12-year-old from Hudson, N.H., with that most damning of diagnoses, a diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma,  an inoperable brain tumor with a median survival of less than a year. Like McKenzie, my own daughter was 12-years-old with a recurring brain tumor that had started to metastasize and ...

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Sometimes it seems that life is unfair and the odds are stacked incredibly against us.  More than 1 in 3 persons will get cancer.  The chance of survival if you get lung, pancreatic or brain tumors is pathetically small.  The most common cancer in 20 to 30-year-olds is the deadly beast melanoma. We have no easy or effective early detection for most cancers. However, there are remarkable stories of hope.  Here ...

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From MedPage Today:

  1. Diet Rich in Beans, Lentils, Peas Lowers LDL. People who consumed a serving a day of dietary "pulses" -- such as beans, chickpeas, lentils and peas -- significantly reduced their low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol.
  2. Dad's Extra Pounds Tied to Kid's Risk for Autism Disorders. Paternal obesity was strongly associated with increased risk for several autism spectrum disorders in children.

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Can narrative medicine inform quality of care? As characterized by Dr. Rita Charon in her JAMA article almost 15 years ago, narrative medicine is “the ability to acknowledge, absorb, interpret, and act on the stories and plights of others.” It is the recognition that scientific knowledge alone is not enough -- not enough for our patients, for ourselves, and for society. It stresses the importance of not only hearing what our ...

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