In the wake of the Orlando shootings, the usual battle lines are drawn in the usual, predictable way. Urban liberals and many Democrats call for more regulations and enforcement to limit access to firearms (especially assault weapons); hunters and conservatives and many Republicans -- and especially the National Rifle Association (NRA) -- ...

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The American Cancer Society (ACS), an advocacy organization that has fairly recently (and very positively) taken a more appropriate, evidence-based approach to cancer screening, recently revised its mammography recommendations. While it still recommends more mammograms than the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (which doesn’t recommend starting until age 50, and then screening only every other year), it has raised the starting age from 40 ...

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Everyone, it seems, knows about the Ice Bucket Challenge, the viral phenomenon that raised record-breaking sums for the Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) Association. This feel-good movement was critiqued by many, but no one can claim it was a bad thing: It raised lots of money, the overwhelming ...

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There’s been a lot written about the measles outbreak and antivaccine parents. Fact is, the current situation is a direct and predictable result of many social/political trends that have emerged in America over the last generation. I am sharing five easy steps to take if you want to create an epidemic just like this. 1. Raise a generation ignorant about science. The majority of Americans are 
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Recently, Dr. Peter Kramer published an intriguing, well-written, but poorly reasoned and potentially dangerous “thought piece” in the New York Times. His article, “Why Doctors Need Stories,” contains several logical flaws and erroneous arguments, but the overarching concept is a classic straw man argument. He creates a false and highly misleading notion of what evidence-based medicine ...

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An intriguing article was recently published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences -- one of the most prestigious (more on “prestige” later) journals around -- with the provocative title, “Rescuing U.S. Biomedical Research from Its Systemic Flaws.” That this was written by some of our country’s most well-respected scientists provides credibility to this challenging and thought-provoking critique. The piece ...

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A recent article in the New York Times highlighted the high costs associated with some types of subspecialty medical care, in particular dermatological procedures like Mohs surgery. Indeed, the patient profiled in the piece went for a minor procedure which, including facilities fees and questionable referrals to an anesthesiologist and plastic surgeon, generated billing that topped an unconscionable $25,000. This piece led to the predictable
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Perhaps you’ve seen some of the media coverage reporting that “an apple a day” would save as many lives as statins do, with fewer side effects. Or perhaps not -- thankfully, this tongue-in-cheek “study” didn’t get the intense coverage received by the new statin guidelines (an issue I Read more...

In a thoughtful, measured and well-reasoned blog post, Dr. Keith Ayoob recently discussed the AMA’s decision to classify obesity as a disease. As he concluded his post, Dr. Ayoob wrote: “I don’t care how obesity is categorized. I care about what’s being done about it ... We need to stop talking about whether obesity is or is not a disease and ...

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