There is a growing body of evidence that hospital mergers lead to higher prices for consumers, employers, insurance and the government. It is imperative to educate patients and lawmakers as to how the consolidation of hospitals and medical practices raise costs, decrease access, eliminate jobs and, ultimately, reduce care quality as a result. Lawmakers should focus on this “first pillar” of cost control as they go back ...

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Watching events unfold at United Airlines over the last few days have filled me with shock, awe, and horror.  As a result of this public relations disaster, their motto “flying the friendly skies” has turned into “not enough seating, prepare for a beating.” America stands as a beacon of freedom from oppression.  United Airlines was an iconic American company until last Sunday, with a responsibility to uphold the intent of ...

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Recently, the AHCA was pulled from the House floor after not enough votes could be secured in favor of its passage.  A Washington Post article reported President Trump’s thoughts on the matter: “We couldn’t get one Democrat vote, not one. They [Democrats] own Obamacare.  So when it explodes … we make one beautiful deal for the people.” Journalist Robert Costa asserted “there was little evidence that either Trump or House Republicans ...

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Transparency -- including price, quality, and effectiveness of medical services-- is a vital component to lowering costs and improving outcomes.  However, it is imperative transparency go hand-in-hand with financial incentives for patients and consumers; otherwise, the quest will be in vain.  The single best way of reducing costs while not worsening health outcomes is to redistribute resources from less cost-effective health services to more cost-effective ones.  Americans are extremely uncomfortable ...

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The CEO of the Mayo Clinic, Dr. Noseworthy, was last heard recommending patients fire their physicians suffering from burnout. While he does not have truckloads of compassion or empathy for colleagues; he is, at least, honest. Dr. Noseworthy recently confessed, “We’re asking … if the patient has commercial insurance, or they’re Medicaid or Medicare patients, and they’re equal that we prioritize the commercial insured patients enough so … We can ...

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As physicians ready themselves for the future of medicine under onerous MACRA regulations, it seems appropriate to glance into the future and visualize the medical utopia anticipated by so many.  Value-based care, determined by statistical analysis, is going to replace fee for service. Six months ago, I received my first set of statistics from a state Medicaid plan and was told my ER utilization numbers were on the higher end compared ...

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In the past few weeks, we have lost two female physician colleagues tragically to suicide, a pediatrician and psychiatrist.  In the general population, males take their lives at four times the rate of females.  However, for physicians specifically, the suicide rate is evenly distributed between genders; making our occupation the one with the highest relative risk for women to die by suicide.  This is ...

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The Mylan EpiPen debacle may have inadvertently weakened the grip of big pharma on U.S. lawmakers.  Recently, a bill proposed by Senator Bernie Sanders was narrowly rejected by a vote of 52 to 46.  Unexpectedly, 12 Republicans and 1 Independent voted with Senator Sanders in favor of allowing pharmacists and distributors to import cheaper prescription drugs from foreign countries.  The winds of change may finally blow in a bipartisan direction.  ...

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Two months into my private practice career, I was assigned a “no doc” patient, a term referring to a child without a regular physician.  This one, in fact, did have a pediatrician, who called me to say “the family fired our group because we have not been able to diagnose the illness in their six-week-old son. He is your responsibility now.” If I have learned anything over the last 15 years, ...

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Thirteen years ago, I received a call from the mother of a college freshman who was concerned because her son had been diagnosed with mononucleosis during finals week.  She felt something was not quite right and asked me for advice. “Trust your instinct, go get him, and bring him home.” She brought him to my clinic the following day.  He looked mildly ill.  His vitals were stable; he was fatigued, slightly dehydrated, ...

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