Most of us reject the rational argument that better medical quality costs more money.   Conversely, I have argued that spending less money could improve medical outcomes.  Developing incentives to reduce unnecessary medical tests and treatments should be our fundamental strategy.  Not a day passes that I don’t confront excessive and unnecessary medical care -- some of it mine -- being foisted on patients. At one point in my career, I would ...

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Get help: Most physicians are not good at business We’ve all heard or used the phrase, "Leave it to the professionals." It certainly applies to me as the only tools that I can use with competence are the scopes that I pass through either end of the digestive tunnel. Yeah, I have a toolbox at home, but it is stocked similarly to the first aid kit that your new car ...

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A few days before I wrote this, a patient had a complication in my office. I have discussed previously the distinction between a complication, which is a blameless event, and a negligent act. In my experience, most lawsuits are initiated against complications or adverse medical outcomes, neither of which are the result of medical negligence. This is the basis for my strong belief that the current medical malpractice system ...

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One catch phrase in health care reform is cost-effectiveness.  To paraphrase, this label means that a medical treatment is worth the price.  For example, influenza vaccine, or flu shot, is effective in reducing the risk of influenza infection.  If the price of each vaccine were $1,000, it would still be medically effective, but it would no longer be cost-effective considering that over 100 million Americans need the vaccine. Society could not ...

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Giving prescription refills is not quite as fun as it used to be. Years ago, we doctors would whip out our prescription pads -- often sooner than we should have -- and we’d scribble some coded language that pharmacists were trained to decipher. I’m surprised there were not more errors owing to doctors’ horrendous penmanship. On occasion, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) would require a pharmaceutical company to change ...

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A medical student recently asked my advice on her decision to pursue a career in dermatology. It was about 25 years ago when my own parents encouraged me to pursue this specialty. What was their deal? Perhaps, they anticipated future developments in the field and were hoping for free Botox treatments? As readers know, I rejected the rarefied world of pustules and itchy skin rashes for the glamor of hemorrhoids, ...

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If you are a physician like me who performs procedures, then rarely you will cause a medical complication. This is a reality of medical life. If perforation of the colon with colonoscopy occurs at a rate of 1 in 1,500, and you do 3,000 colonoscopies each year, then you can do the math. Remember that a complication is a blameless event, in contrast to a negligent act when the physician is ...

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Is your doctor a hammer and you're a nail? Here's some insider advice coaxing patients to be more wary and skeptical of medical advice. Should you trust your doctor? Absolutely. But you need to serve as a spirited advocate for your own health or bring one with you. Ask your physician for the evidence. Sometimes, his medical advice may result more from judgement and experience as there may not be ...

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Is much of the annual physical a waste of time? So much in medicine and in life is done out of habit.   We do stuff simply because that’s the way we always did it.  Repetition leads to the belief that we are doing the right thing. In this country, we traditionally eat three meals each day.  Why not four or two? We prefer soft drinks to be served iced cold.  I’ve never tried ...

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I’m all for free speech and I’m very hostile to censorship.  The response to ugly speech is not censorship, but is rebuttal speech.   Of course, there’s a lot of speech out there that should never be uttered.  Indecent and rude speech is constitutionally protected, but is usually a poor choice.    We have the right to make speech that is wrong. I relish my free speech in the office with patients.   I ...

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