Some of your relatives have had cancer. And, you’ve heard that people with a family history of the disease may be more likely to get cancer. So, should you consider genetic testing to find out if cancer runs in your family? Here’s what you need to know to make a more informed decision. Most cancer cases aren’t related to family history. Only about 5 to 10% of cancer cases are due to an ...

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The holidays are a great opportunity to ask family members about their health history. Learning about your family’s health history can help you answer your doctor’s medical history questions. It can even help your doctor determine if you may be at risk for an inherited cancer like breast, colorectal, ovarian, prostate or endometrial cancer, which sometimes run in the family. Keep in mind that just a small portion of cancers – about
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shutterstock_212802112 If you’re relatively young and healthy, gynecologic cancers probably aren't on your radar. But they should be. This year, more than 80,000 women in the United States will get a gynecologic cancer, such as endometrial (a.k.a. uterine), ovarian or cervical cancer. In general, gynecologic cancers occur more frequently in women after menopause, although they can occur in younger women. While all women ...

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