Looking ahead to the next several months, I’ve found myself frequently wondering how many physicians will make this their year to take the plunge and join an online social network. There are significant advantages that can be gained for doctors who embrace social media. Here are five ways you and your practice can benefit from such professional connections. 1. Finding a better job. The business of the health care economy continues to ...

Read more...

Many physicians intentionally choose to avoid online social networking websites like LinkedIn, Facebook, and Twitter. Physicians want to maintain their privacy and they don’t want patients “finding” them on these public sites. If you’re thinking about a career transition or if you’re looking for non-clinical jobs that may provide supplemental income, it is very important to expand your social network by engaging others on social networking websites. There are ...

Read more...

There's a great blog post on Harvard Business Review titled, "Does an Entrepreneur Need an MBA?" I'm now enrolled in business school and I'm pursuing an MBA. I don't consider myself a traditional entrepreneur, but I've started a few things here and there. Someday, I may take a big risk and start a "real" company, but for now I'm comfortable bootstrapping my way through a few little ventures. The ...

Read more...

Travel is frequently required for non-clinical jobs. The big question is: how much travel? When a job description indicates 30% travel, do you know what that really means? What if you had to travel 30% each week? 30% each month? If there are 5 working days each week and 4 weeks each month, then there are approximately 20 working days each month. Are you willing to be gone 6 days each ...

Read more...

What are entry-level non-clinical physician job salaries? Let me clarify what I mean by "entry-level" here: I'm referring to non-clinical jobs that physicians may find if they leave clinical medicine to pursue a non-clinical job in a company (such as a medical communications company, a health IT company, pharmaceutical, biotechnology, or a consulting company). So, let's look at several examples: * A primary care physician who's making $120k/year leaves clinical medicine and begins ...

Read more...

I speak with many physicians who are interested in leaving clinical medicine to pursue an alternative career (non-clinical job) and they always seem to ask the same types of questions. Let's dig into some of those "Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)" by exploring some common questions that are rooted in myths and misconceptions. Here are some questions that I get all the time from physicians who are considering a career transition: 1. How ...

Read more...

When physicians choose to leave clinical medicine to pursue alternative careers, what motivates them to make such changes? Is it money? More time with family? Scheduling flexibility? Avoiding litigation? To pursue new challenges? Maybe you're getting bored with medicine. Depending on that key motivating factor, physicians end up choosing all types of career paths. For instance, let's take a look at some of these motivators: Money. Let's face it. Some physicians love ...

Read more...

We've heard of several medical schools requiring students to use either an Apple iPhone or iPod touch, but what about the iPad? Some schools have been experimenting with digital e-book readers like the Amazon Kindle. Medical textbooks are frequently filled with photos and other color-rich images, so the grayscale Kindle isn't the ideal e-book reader for medical students who wish to carry their textbooks electronically. This is where the Apple iPad ...

Read more...

The current (first generation) Apple iPad probably won't run a robust electronic health record (EHR). 10 ways an Apple iPad can help doctors improve patient care However, it may run some iPhone/iPod touch EHR/EMR apps. I think most physicians will prefer to use a standard tablet PC instead of the iPad. However, given that a large percentage of physicians are not using the tablet in the outpatient office setting, perhaps ...

Read more...

How many physicians do you know who have chosen to leave their clinical practice? There's no doubt that physicians are getting burned out. Many are tired of fighting insurance companies and even more physicians are getting discouraged about reductions in reimbursement. This has caused some physicians to drop Medicare and Medicaid. Others have switched to cash-only or concierge/boutique practice models. Then you have your group of physicians who have simply decided ...

Read more...

1 Pages