2:15 a.m., July 2, 1981. Its 83 degrees outside in a loud, humid Chicago night, but here the scrubbed air is chilled, dry, while white tiles reflect the occasional nurse, who appear and vanish, and the rhythmic sighs of the machines, gasping somewhere down empty halls, are occasionally interrupted by a frantic chime. My first night in the unit and my first patient’s chart.  Papers spill from the accidentally opened binder ...

Read more...

Autonomous dissection by the internet. We all do it, but is taking an online medical selfie really a good thing? Disease, prognosis, and treatment explained in exquisite, exhaustive, confused, nonspecific and erroneous detail, which often yields the wrong diagnosis, recommendations for irrelevant therapy and wildly inaccurate conclusions, resulting in confusion and fear. Given this common reality, should patients avoid computer self-investigation entirely and leave e-research to the “professionals?” The bad Patients, left ...

Read more...

Sometimes, I think that that guiding principal of the medical profession, “first, do no harm,” is hopelessly out-of-date. Clearly, a physician should understand her limits, and never should she give care, which hurts, more than helps. Nonetheless, this axiom implies that the doctor is in control, and decides the treatment. Some of the time, a modern motto, which recognizes the true position and limits of the modern doc, might be, ...

Read more...

Doctors have become a profession of whiners.  Meetings, dinners, doctor lounges and the blogosphere are flooded with physician complaints, tirade, and anger. The volume of pained voices suggests that health Armageddon is only a few moments away. It was not always so.  Medicine is a career where idealism runs rampant.  In medical school interviews, young students really do answer that they want to help their fellow man.  Nonetheless, in recent years ...

Read more...

Recently, a patient of mine died of cancer, whom I loved very much.  She had a special way of enjoying life; a half, wise smile that after our many years together did not take me too seriously and reflected her deep inner strength.  She taught me about joy; I will miss her always.  Her husband, understanding my loss, said that it was alright, that I had done my best, that he ...

Read more...

Doctors have several bad habits. They order piles of tests just to get a vague, unfocused view of a patient’s health. They order expensive and invasive tests to rule out the unlikely or extraordinarily rare. The worst “bad test habit” is when doctors order a test, which, no matter what the result, will not change what they are planning to do. Why do doctors over order? These same people thought a ...

Read more...

Among hospice staff, it is called “getting it.” One says, “He doesn’t get it,” “I think she gets it,” or, “They definitely get it.” It is a little hard to define, but as with pornography, you know it when you see it.   Nonetheless, given the importance of “getting” good end-of-life care, let us take a moment to try and explain. The 92-year-old patient is bleeding into her head, but has blood ...

Read more...

"If it walks like a duck and quacks like a duck, it is probably a duck. " At 62 years old, Roberta had been healthy. She walked three miles a day, stayed up late and enjoyed events with her three grandchildren. She had no history of significant surgery, and took only a single pill for blood pressure. The only health tragedy in her life was the death of her last child, an ...

Read more...

Like an anthem, a holy grail, the word appears in every journal, every proposal, and every health strategic plan. “Quality.” We say, read and hear it so often we are developing quality fatigue. Like iterative hackneyed phrases such as “out-of-the-box”, “deep-dive” and perhaps even “personalized medicine,” quality has begun to feel like water torture and risks being deprived of flavor or meaning.  However, do not so fooled or bludgeoned that you lose ...

Read more...

Doctors have an interesting problem. They have an ingrained professional obsessive-compulsive habit; they fixate on the care of individual patients and on the science of healing. This is an admirable trait; it results in high-quality care. However, when physicians need to change their attention from healer to leader, from medicine to the business of medicine, from health care to the health care system, they falter. Stuck in silos, they fail to ...

Read more...

16 Pages

Most Popular