I have a patient with very unusual visual symptoms and sense of imbalance that has persisted for more than a year.  She describes very unusual and concerning symptoms including true diplopia, a sense of major visual disturbances like the floor buckling in her visual fields, vertigo, severe sense of imbalance and swaying, headache, memory fog and concentration difficulty. Of note is that her symptoms seemed to start after a cruise.  I ...

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We can now add vitamin B12 deficiency to the growing list of risks of long term use of the proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). The New York Times had an article outlining the evidence that prolonged use of both proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) like Prilosec, Protonix, Prevacid and others, as well as the less potent H2 blockers like Zantac and Pepcid, can lead to vitamin B12 deficiency.  This is in addition to ...

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Early diagnosis, preventative care and aggressive disease management are mainstays of American medicine today.  Proponents argue that early diagnosis and prevention are the keys to healthy living. Skeptics suspect that many of the screening tests for early asymptomatic disease and preventative treatments we undergo lead to overdiagnosis, unnecessary expense, exposure to diagnostic and therapeutic interventions which themselves have risks, and that often cause more harm than good. As a physician and ...

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In Pierce County, Washington, where I work, it is difficult to find a psychiatrist to care for psychiatric cases that are outside the scope of practice of a primary care physician.  Our community is not unusual in this situation.  There is a nationwide shortage of physicians specializing in psychiatry. According to Tom Insel, MD, the director of the Institute of Mental Health in 2011 both the number of psychiatry residency programs and the ...

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The Affordable Care Act (ACA) will make insurers unable to exclude Americans with serious health problems from enrolling in insurance plans. This is among the most popular aspects of Obamacare. It is also the most likely explanation for huge premium increases in plans for individuals not on employer group policies. Persons employed by companies with insurance plans for their employees, usually called group plans, routinely accept all eligible employees, regardless of ...

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What does a modern internal medicine intern do all day (and night)?  It turns out they spend 40% of their time at work using a computer, another 20% on other aspects of patient care that is not in the presence of the patient, 15% in educational activities, 5% on basic needs like walking around and eating, and only 12% in direct patient care. Direct patient care includes interviewing patients, examining ...

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Watchful waiting has become a term often thought of as an alternative to surgery, radiation, or other interventions for early stage prostate cancer. Watchful waiting is actually a viable option for many other conditions too. Most Mom’s know that tincture of time with watchful waiting lets their children have the opportunity to recover without intervention for many minor injuries and illnesses without exposing them to the risks associated with antibiotics or ...

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As a family physician I look forward to the next few years in practice with a sense of uncertainty.  One of biggest of these uncertainties is how to help meet the anticipated demand for primary care I expect.  A number of changes are coming that will alter the supply and demand equation for patients and primary care providers. These include significant projected population demographics, and others that are due to ...

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The price has been in lives.  The capture and killing of Osama bin Laden occurred without loss of any U.S. military lives.  It was hailed as a hugely successful special forces and intelligence operation. Still to believe that the operation was accomplished without the loss of life is both incorrect and naive. The lives lost have been those of polio vaccination workers murdered in the backlash against the use of ...

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I recently read a very good article in the New York Times about a patient found to have the classic incidentaloma, a small mass in the adrenal gland.  This is estimated to be seen in 4% of abdominal CT scans, and is rarely serious but typically leads to recommendations for additional testing and follow up CT scans to assure that it is not either a metastatic cancer from ...

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