As defined in Wikipedia, remote patient monitoring (RPM) is: “a technology to enable monitoring of patients outside of conventional clinical settings (e.g. in the home), which may increase access to care and decrease healthcare delivery costs.” I was a pioneer adopter of RPM as a beta site for Medtronic’s Carelink wireless system which monitors implantable cardiac rhythm devices (defibrillators and pacemakers). RPM has gained significant attention because of recently mandated penalties ...

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5 reasons why mobile health apps fail There are an estimated 15,000 medical apps presently on the market and is expected to grow 25% per year according to one study. There are issues which are common in the development of these apps and other categories of apps. However, some technical and non-technical issues are unique to the sector. As someone who does not design apps, I will ...

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5 reasons why mobile technology needs clinical trials I have long been a proponent of proven technology in the digital health space.  Probably the most obvious reason is to dispel the generalized notion that these technologies are flimsy.  The HHS Text4HealthTask Force has endorsed clinical studies in its recommendations. There certainly have been studies performed. One interesting one, the final report of The National ...

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Do patient portals increase patient engagement? Wikipedia defines patient portals as "... healthcare-related online applications that allow patients to interact and communicate with their healthcare providers. Some patient portal applications exist as stand-alone websites and sell their services to healthcare providers. Other portal applications are integrated into the existing web site of a healthcare provider. Still others are modules added onto an existing electronic medical record system. What all of these services ...

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Mobile health technology adoption depends on insurers Insurers will also play a pivotal role in the development and adoption of patient-focused mobile health (mHealth) technology adoption for wellness as well as for the management of chronic diseases. 1. Payers hold the purse strings.  Insurers will be the ones paying for the use of mHealth for chronic disease management for the vast majority of patients.  They have a vested interest ...

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The physician’s role is drastically changing.  More and more physicians are becoming institutional employees.  More patient encounters are performed via non-physician providers.  The increasing regulatory demands on physicians are consuming an inordinate amount of their time. Stress and burnout are universal to some degree. Both the financial and emotional rewards of practicing medicine have greatly diminished. They are becoming more quality control officers than healthcare providers.  However, physicians will never ...

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A draft of standards for a health and medical app certification program was released recently by Happtique.  As a matter of disclosure I am proud to have been the Chair of the panel that drafted these standards.  The standards are in draft form and are open to public comment until August 17, 2012. While some might say that these standards add even more barriers to the commercial adoption of these technologies, there ...

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The Jackson Coker Special Report on Apps, Doctors, and Digital Devices, originally published in October 2011, was featured in a recent online article with the headline “80% of Doctors Use Smartphones and Medical Apps in Everyday Medical Practice.” If one delves a bit more into the facts, the 80% quoted in the Jackson and Coker report is derived from yet another study by Aptilon reported in April, 2011 by mobihealthnews stating ...

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A recent post in the DailyDealMedia caught my attention. It was titled “Uprising in Mobile Health Care: Could Medical Apps Replace Doctors?” The theme of technology versus humanistic aspects of medicine has been the subject of debate for many decades, obviously predating the advent of medical apps.  I find it interesting that the introduction of the referenced PwC study highlights the fact that “Solutions, not technology, are the key to success.” Another piece on ...

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“Generation C” has recently been defined by Nielsen as adults between 18 and 34 years old, who are entrenched in digital technologies. They are indeed the connected generation and use technology by choice in all facets of life. It is part of their fabric.  Those entering the field of medicine would logically desire and expect to carry that over to their professional lives.  However, there are multiple barriers to the continuity ...

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