It was a quarter past six in the evening. The day team had just completed their signout to us. As we sat quietly along the periphery of the trauma bay getting oriented to our list of patients, a small army of hospital personnel started trickling in. We were expecting company. He was rolled into the first slot. From behind the desk, I tried assessing how serious the injuries were, but the ...

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I open the heavy, wooden door to the unit. On my left are the patient rooms, equipped with minimal privacy; to my right are members of the healthcare team shuffling around. I continue toward my destination, a small room containing a couple desks and computers dedicated to mid-level providers, but cannot help but notice how eerie the unit is. Although there are at least fifty individuals within this space, it ...

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A real code deviates from what they depict in medical dramas like Grey's Anatomy. Television chest compressions are usually too slow and superficial, they are nowhere near forceful enough to sustain blood flow throughout the body. There is no foreboding soundtrack to hint at what's coming, only the numbers that appear on the monitor that suddenly dip in the wrong direction. Although I understood the magnitude of the situation as it ...

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This morning started off like any other. I parked my car, walked into Starbucks and pulled up my iPhone app while waiting in line. The usual suspects were already there  -- the elderly fellow that always flirts with the baristas, the business man with his freshly pressed suit and the tired-looking mother. As I approached the counter, I ordered my usual summer morning beverage and went through the motions to ...

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This is an account of my first encounter with an in-patient from a little while back -- I have provided only minimal details about the patient to maintain compliance with HIPAA. After a firm handshake with each of us, our preceptor embarked purposefully up two floors to our first in-patient encounter. As we walked, I peeked into the rooms with the door left ajar and wondered what brought each individual to ...

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Let’s face it, medicine is slow to change – the profession has produced successful physicians for centuries using an education system based on grueling hours and unwavering dedication. Many established medical schools boast impressive Step 1 scores and match rates, so why should they modify what works? Change is necessary because our society needs the next generation of physicians to be technologically savvy and driven toward innovation. With the increasing prevalence ...

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