Do you know what the operator or person at the front desk is saying about palliative care?  When people call, saying the want palliative care, how are they responding? A study being presented in abstract form at the palliative care and oncology research symposium addresses this simple but critical question. Researchers at Duke (Kathryn Hutchins, third-year medical student first author, Arif Kamal, oncopal researcher, senior author) cold called 40 major comprehensive cancer ...

Read more...

Have you ever had that experience when you think what you're doing is futile, and that thought goes through your mind: "Why am I doing this?" "I'm torturing him." "This feels wrong." For those of us that are physicians, think back to your internship and residency training.  I think we can all remember at least one of these situations, if not more. I remember being in the ICU as a third-year internal medicine resident, being sent ...

Read more...

shutterstock_246953212 Let's take a moment to consider what makes a terrific nurse. First, by way of gathering information, let's consider the health care industry's present views on excellence in nursing.  Let's think about how this conception of excellence in nursing aligns with our own perspectives. In a recent Atlantic article, titled "The Problem with Satisfied Patients," Alexandra Robbins writes about the economic ...

Read more...

In a study in the American Journal of Infection Control, researchers coated a gloved hand in E. coli.  One person with the E. coli glove then they shook hands, high-fived, and fist bumped another person with a sterile glove.  Transfer of E. coli to the sterile glove was measured. Results:

  • highest transfer of bacteria: handshake
  • lowest transfer of bacteria: fist bump (high five was in the middle)
  • difference: fist bump less than 10% of ...

    Read more...

One of the skilled nursing facilities I work with has a hospice unit.  We occasionally have patients on the hospice unit who might benefit from physical therapy.  The physical therapists that see patients in the skilled nursing facility say they will talk with the patient about their goals, and if their goals are to maintain their current level of functioning, they will work with the patient.  If the goals are ...

Read more...

Case 1: You have a 94-year-old woman with multiple medical problems in hospice who develops a fever (subjectively hot to the touch), shortness of breath, and a cough producing yellow sputum.  Her daughter asks if she can be treated with antibiotics "to make her feel better."  The patient is not well enough to make decisions, but in earlier conversations had stated a goal of remaining comfortable at home, while also ...

Read more...

Advanced dementia is a terminal illness needing palliative care. Unfortunately, there is a great divide between this statement of the world as it should be, and the current reality of the world as it is.  Rates of pain and shortness of breath are high for patients with advance dementia.  Patients with advanced dementia often reside in nursing homes, and few nursing homes offer specialized palliative care services. And, as we can see from an ...

Read more...

What is a natural death, anyway? I get it - death is part of the cycle of life. Seasons change.  The moon waxes and wanes.  We are born. We die.  Death is natural. But what is a "natural" death?  Seriously, what comes to mind when you think of natural death?  Here is a video of a natural death, taken from the Planet Earth series: Death in nature is often violent, brutal, ...

Read more...

Here is the setup.  You're working in the ICU.  You want to communicate a prognosis to the family of a patient who is so ill he cannot make decisions.  You sensitively state the facts: the patient has less than a 5% chance of survival.  Or perhaps you say "he will definitely not survive." The family confers, and decides that they want to focus on keeping him alive as long as possible. ...

Read more...

"Mom's been writing goofy checks..." "Dad stopped paying his bills...." "Grandma wired her savings to Nigeria..." Have you heard these phrases from the family caregivers of your elderly patients?  Have you ever been concerned that your patient may lack capacity for financial decision making?  How do you decide if they lack capacity?  What is the clinician's role in making these decisions?  What is their responsibility? These important questions are addressed in a terrific new article in ...

Read more...

2 Pages

Most Popular