Restless legs, irritable bowel syndrome, menopause. Are the pharmaceuticals inventing diseases?

More men are being screened for prostate cancer than colon cancer, even though colon cancer screening has been shown to reduce death. Prostate cancer screening is still of dubious value.

Stories from a cruise ship physician.

NY Times on when a patient goes against medical advice:

This was clearly what Jeanette wanted to hear. She told me how she had exerted herself all day, helping to prepare the Thanksgiving meal. She had gotten sweaty and lightheaded during dinner and then passed out. "I just overdid it," she explained. "I'll be just fine."

I reminded her once more that the safest thing was to go ...

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As seen on Medrants, trial judges go to school to learn about medicine:

Dr. Calvo said the goal is to show judges that most of human biology and medicine is not black and white.

And judges at the first round of classes said they learned exactly that. In addition to acquiring a scientific knowledge base, judges said they learned that understanding physician-patient communication is key to interpreting complex ...

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Steve Nissen, the nation's most controversial heart doctor. (via PharmaGossip)

The world of high-deductible insurance - where you may pay a higher rate than the uninsured:

Case in point: Lisa Stamm of Kendall, who had a simple earache and got slapped with a $375 bill for about 10 minutes with a nurse practitioner. If she had no insurance, she could have paid $125. If she had a no-deductible policy, her insurer might have paid about $140, and she would ...

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A letter defends Walgreen's customer notes (written about previously):

These "notes" are descriptions to prepare the professional for the client, good or bad. And if the client is acting out, then the professional should be able write what he/she wishes to prepare for the next time.

It is about time some of the rude people should hear that they are, in fact, rude.

What hurts is ...

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Do the obese know that they are obese? Apparently not.

A "professor of experimental therapeutics" wants to treat heart disease with chocolate. Sounds like something from House, M.D.

You think we have a problem with the uninsured? Take a look at China:

A construction worker, his leg smashed in a bulldozer accident, sat all night outside a city hospital here, afraid to go in. A doctor told him to bring $600 cash - more than he earns in a year - and prepare for an amputation. His buddies wheeled him away on a flatbed tricycle.

A surgeon operates on the wrong body part . . . for the third time.

How an EHR is slowing visits, and reducing access:

Rollout of the Defense Department's electronic medical record-keeping system has reduced patient access to many military outpatient clinics and lengthened workdays for many doctors, say physicians and system administrators . . .

. . . Because of appointment backlogs, Nelson said, many parents are bringing children to the center's emergency room for care. "We are so far behind. ... ...

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Car mechanics and medicine:

"Every time you go to the dealership for an oil change, it seems, the car ends up needing some other service as well." . . .

. . . Suddenly, I could envision a scene in which the roles were reversed. A 50-year-old mechanic comes to see his family physician. Active and apparently fit, this patient rarely visits the office, but, on this day, he'd ...

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Is Advair the next Vioxx?

Now growing evidence suggests that a small percentage of patients--perhaps 4,000 people a year, by one doctor's estimate--may be dying because of Advair or its Serevent component. This highlights a tough dilemma in drug safety: what to do about drugs that help many but harm a few. It could mark the start of the next great drug-liability war, and already the drama seems all ...

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Overlawyered with a "wrongful birth" roundup.

Ironic: By covering certain cancer drugs in Medical Part D, it has made them more expensive for patients.

Despite the uselessness of the annual physical, we still have to do them:

True, the very notion of a requisite annual physical is controversial. However, patients appreciate doctors who are meticulous, and patients (and jurors) don't read medical journal articles advising against physicals. I use the annual physical as a preventive review for my patients to make sure they're up to date on mammo, Pap, DEXA, PSA, urinalysis, guaiac ...

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The Australian Medical Association wants to ban boxing from the Olympics:

"A competition in which the winner is determined either by delivering a greater number of blows to his opponent or by literally knocking his opponent senseless is no sport," Dr Haikerwal says.

Why EHRs fail:

EHRs that fail, limp along, or are only partially implemented aren't a problem limited to systems sold by NextGen. Physicians and group administrators told us about difficulties with several other programs, including some that are considered industry leaders. Nor are implementation problems always the fault of the EHR or its vendor. In many cases, these problems occurred because doctors purchased something that was inappropriate for their practices, ...

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