More quackery - the maker of Airborne is changing its packaging:

Airborne said that a double-blind, placebo-controlled study was conducted with "care and professionalism" by a company specializing in clinical trial management, GNG Pharmaceutical Services.

GNG is actually a two-man operation started up just to do the Airborne study. There was no clinic, no scientists and no doctors. The man who ran things said he had lots of ...

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Dr. Reese looks at a case of tinea versicolor on Survivor: Exile Island.

More attacks on the Canadian health care system:

In an interesting parallel with socialist arguments against school vouchers in America, socialist defenders of "free" health care in Canada warn that allowing private clinics will "drain the public system of doctors and nurses." This is tantamount to an admission that doctors, nurses, and patients are unhappy with the current system, though of course defenders of the status quo don't recognize that ...

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Dr. RW talks about how the absurd (aka complementary and alternative medicine) is often looked at uncritically:

Detractors are fond of saying "“but medical students need to know about these things"” or "“they'’re doing research". Trouble is, much of this so called "education and research" amounts to little more than uncritical promotion of quackery. I'’ve given examples before, and the authors of the MJA piece make the case effectively. ...

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Dedication: A 96-year old physician continues his duties as chair of the OB department.

Tort reform in Texas is improving physician access. "Physicians and other health care providers are pleased with the results so far.
Citing Texas Department of Insurance figures, a Texas Alliance for Patient Access analysis of Proposition 12's impact noted an 11.7 percent average cut in the malpractice insurance rates.

The alliance is made up of health care interests who support medical liability reforms.

The analysis also emphasized an ...

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OBs say that Washington's mini-mal reform isn't enough:

"These proposals really do nothing to lower the exposure risk for obstetricians," said Anton-McIntyre, who had confronted Gov. Chris Gregoire last month during a state medical association meeting in Olympia.

Anton-McIntyre, who said she has never been sued for her obstetrical care, told Gregoire that she needed to see improvements in the liability environment or she would give notice to her ...

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This physician takes follow-ups seriously. And rightly so:

Nobody wants to cross Dr. Mayda Melendez.

It's not that her patients in the Tiny Steps prenatal program at St. Francis Hospital fear her, they just know they'll never hear the end of it.

If they don't show up for their appointments, a nurse will call and ask why. If Melendez suggests they cut back on sweets and they ...

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Frivolous? An interesting case where parents are suing a doctor for a Munchausen syndrome by proxy diagnosis:

The parents of 3-year-old boy have sued a prominent pediatrician at the Cleveland Clinic who accused the couple of faking their son's illnesses.

Scott and Tricia Beam of suburban Chippewa Lake were outraged when their son, Tyler, was placed with a foster family while the couple was under investigation by the ...

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Can the Swiss health care system work here? "Every resident of Switzerland is required to buy health insurance. If they don't, they pay stiff monetary penalties. Companies have no role. Health-care plans are chosen at the kitchen table, not through employee benefit departments.

And the plans can be costly. A family of four in Switzerland pays an average of $680 a month in premiums. Government assistance helps pay ...

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Mark Lanier, up close. "The 45-year-old Texas lawyer describes himself as 'just a common person.' But this common man earns $10 million in a good year, and his firm will receive 13 percent of the Vioxx judgment (though it will probably be reduced under Texas law)."

The Well-Timed Period teaches the basics of surgical abortion.

Is Mardi Gras going to overwhelm the New Orleans health care system?

Raucous Mardi Gras crowds pose a challenge to emergency medical services every year. But the city this year is bracing itself because emergency rooms are already filled near capacity trying to provide everyday health care for city residents while several hospitals remain closed.

Welcome to Canada II: "This is a country in which dogs can get a hip replacement in under a week and in which humans can wait two to three years."

Montana is using shock ads to battle meth.

Apparently, what they teach you in medical school is falling by the wayside. First, you can't ask about guns. Now you can't take a proper sexual history:

A few years ago, when our daughters were 13-ish, I was sitting in the field hockey bleachers with a friend. She confessed that she'd just had an unsettling experience at the pediatrician's office.

Seems that in the course ...

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A pediatrician is assaulted outside her clinic by a man demanding drugs.

A bill is introduced that would bar physicians from asking about gun ownership:

A pediatrician who asks a child's parent about firearms in their home could lose his or her license or be disciplined under legislation being considered by a Senate committee today.

The bill would prohibit health care professionals from asking a patient about gun possession, ownership or storage unless the patient is being treated for an injury ...

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Welcome to Canada. A hospital is penalized for being too efficient:

The Health Department has ordered the hospital to stop doing hip and knee surgeries until the next fiscal year, which begins in April, according to Dr. Ethan Lichtblau.

The hospital in the Rosemont district has hit a government-set target number, and depleted its prosthesis budget for this year.

"The government has actually stopped our hospital for ...

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Derek Lowe looks further at the NEJM vs VIGOR authors war. "Y'know, it occurs to me that there are a few people who aren't as upset about all this editorial wrangling: the editors of JAMA and the other top-ranked medical journals. They'll be getting some manuscripts that otherwise would have gone to NEJM."