According to this Gallup survey:

Some jobs are highly regarded. The Gallup Poll asked 1,003 adults in April 2005: "Suppose a young man came to you for advice on choosing a line of work or career. What would you recommend?" The top answer was doctor (17 percent); the second was computers (11 percent). For "a young woman," the answers were doctor, 20 percent; nursing, 13 percent.

This is one thankless job. I'm surprised he stayed on as long as he did.

Something to think about for those scheduling for convenience:

Part of the reason for the increased mortality may be that labor, unpleasant as it sometimes is for the mother, is beneficial to the baby in releasing hormones that promote healthy lung function. The physical compression of the baby during labor is also useful in removing fluid from the lungs and helping the baby prepare to breathe air.

Death by stingray

Chris Rangel looks closer at Steve Irwin's tragic death.

Even though insurers are paying for them. The reason? It takes away from office visits, which in turn reduces revenue.

A new trend is occurring, taking "failure to diagnose" to extreme measures. A warning to primary-care physicians everywhere:

The growing acceptance of the lost chance doctrine represents a real threat to primary care physicians, who are often the first line of defense in diagnosing potentially serious conditions. But it also provides an alternative means of compensation for malpractice plaintiffs whose cancer or other conditions should have been diagnosed ...

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The Katrina Blog Project

Fascinating memoirs from Michael Hebert, a physician who lived through Hurricaine Katrina.

Apparently the doctors in India refused to treat her due to her HIV status.

A fact that would have gone uncovered if cigarette companies had their choice:

The three most popular brands chosen by young smokers "” Marlboro, Newport and Camel "” all delivered significantly more nicotine as the years passed. Virtually all brands were found to deliver a high enough nicotine dose to cause heavy dependence. This trend has escaped notice because the standard government test uses a machine that fails to mimic ...

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Surely a disturbing finding.

He's running an interesting series of posts on the topic:

When it comes to cancer treatment, we are indeed Neanderthal, compared to the ideal, and to how it'll surely be in a few decades. It's because of two most major failings: first, we have no way of knowing, for a given individual, how much is enough to cure a cancer (and the converse: we can't tell which tumors aren't ...

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NEJM on primary care

A must-read article on the challenges facing primary care today:

No serious proposals to narrow the income gap between primary care physicians and specialists are on the national agenda. Fee-for-service payment rewards quantity rather than quality, fostering the rushed visits that underlie primary care's shortcomings. Pay-for-performance programs appear to be insufficient to make a substantial difference; physicians could increase their income more -— with less additional work -— by ...

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Most of the major non-profit Boston hospital CEOs are making in excess of $1 million.

The jury sends a clear message to a PCP in this case of hematuria which turned out to be bladder cancer:

"They realized, in a man over 50 years old who has blood in his urine, it is bladder cancer the majority of the time," said Gregory Patton, Doniger's Santa Ana attorney. "The doctor decided that he knew more than urologists do, and he was going to treat it like ...

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Many college students in China are going under the knife during the summer:

Like a growing number of students in China, Pan Ou will spend her university vacation going under the knife in a plastic surgery procedure she hopes will boost her chances of getting a good job after graduation . . .

. . . The EverCare in Beijing is one of thousands of plastic surgery clinics ...

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Another medical top 10 list - this time, the most likely misdiagnosed diseases.

According to a recent survey in Florida:

Of the students who considered ob/gyn but decided against it, 32 percent ranked "fear of malpractice" as the first or second deterrent to entering the field, compared to 21 percent who never considered ob/gyn. Nearly 27 percent of students who considered ob/gyn ranked "fear of being sued" as a first or second deterrent compared to 7 percent who never considered the specialty.


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He spends a morning a week in clinic:

At the clinic, which is affiliated with the country'Â’s best-known private hospital, Dr. Vazquez wears a white smock with his name embroidered on a pocket. His colleagues, men and women alike, greet him with a kiss on the cheek, as is the custom here, and address him as "Doctor" rather than "Mr. President."

Cutler with a policy piece in the NEJM. Matthew Holt dissents.

More religion-based OB/GYN practices are popping up:

The center is one of a small but growing number of practices around the country that tailor the care they provide to the religious beliefs of their doctors, shunning birth-control and morning-after pills, IUDs and other contraceptive devices, sterilizations, and abortions, as well as in vitro fertilization. Instead, doctors offer "natural family planning" -- teaching couples to monitor a woman's temperature and other ...

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