Politics blatantly ignoring the science? It's so wrong, and Sid Schwab has a few choice words:

. . . dammit, there are some areas in which reality -- not to mention the common good -- ought to trump politics, ideology, and theology. People argue, and I don't disagree, that science isn't the same as policy; that scientists aren't the ones setting political agenda. Fair enough. But when science ...

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Less is more

Yes, stopping medications can sometimes do the trick.

Ezra Klein says if the state-level reforms fail, it will set back the universal care movement. David Catron comments.

If the FDA had approved the claim, pizzerias would have touted that their pizzas could prevent cancer.

Do you think he won the case? Find the outcome here:

. . . a patient presented to an Emergency Department having cut off two fingers with a table saw. The injury occurred at 6:30 p.m. The patient was triaged at 7:19 p.m. The emergency medicine physician saw the patient at 7:42 p.m. X-rays were performed at 11:33 p.m. Orthopedics was finally consulted at 1:00 a.m., more ...

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The fighter against frivolous lawsuits takes on another cause:

I developed Medical Justice, based on a proactive approach, to tackle the problem of frivolous malpractice lawsuits. Since then we've developed a contract-based solution addressing this new threat and are already seeing results. While it is difficult to file suit against the website itself, you can put safeguards into place to prevent defamation on the internet. In other words, there ...

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The tragic cases of neonatal euthanasia in the UK.

What links the two? Hate:

So what would drive these men to such hideous acts of murder?

I believe that it is hate. Hate that is taught to them at a very young age. Hatred of the West. Hatred for Jews. Hatred of infidels or anyone, even Muslims, who do not conform to their view of religion as they imagine it.

Being too careful can also be dangerous.

Thus far, their toned-down, non single-payer proposals are politically smart. Michael Tanner disagrees.

"Prostatempathy"

Despite the evidence, physicians still order screening PSA's to populations that may not need the test. Who tends to be the culprits?

Practitioners who were urology specialists, male, infrequent PSA test orderers, and affiliated with specific hospitals had significantly higher levels of inappropriate PSA screening. Compared with attending physicians, nurses and physician assistants had significantly lower levels of inappropriate screening. Under multivariate modeling, infrequent PSA test ordering and ...

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The specialists that I work with are normally very thorough in their notes and assessment. But apparently that's not happening everywhere.

But the lottery is ok:

The average American spent $177 playing the lottery, more than the average spent on reading materials. Massachusetts is fifth in the nation in per-capital lottery spending at $700.

I had seen this number in previous years, but each time I do, I am blown away. That is $700 for every man, woman, and child in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. According to the US ...

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The public perception is that more screening is better. It doesn't help that doctors are not consistent in their screening practices:

The problem with this is that there is a bit of a PR problem trying to explain to parents who think I am not doing what I should by testing their children. Many of my straight-pediatric colleagues still routinely test children's cholesterol, so parents are surprised when I ...

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A car accident patient in the ER. How that visit is being paid doesn't make a lot of sense.

Much ado has been made touting EMR's improving quality of care. So far, the data doesn't back that up:

Electronic health records -- touted by policymakers as a way to improve the quality of health care -- failed to boost care delivered in routine doctor visits, U.S. researchers said on Monday.

Of 17 measures of quality assessed, electronic health records made no difference in 14 measures, according ...

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American Cancer Society-approved ads are causing a stir by playing loose with the evidence:

"We do have some pretty good evidence that sunscreen will reduce your risk of the less lethal forms of skin cancer," Dr. Kramer added. "There's very little evidence that sunscreens protect you against melanoma, yet you often hear that as the dominant message."

Dr. J. Leonard Lichtenfeld, deputy chief medical officer at the American ...

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"America’s Best"?

A study looks a the problems with relying on quality data:

In an accompanying editorial, Sean Michael O'Brien, Ph.D., and Eric D. Peterson, M.D., both of Duke University, said the findings add to the "sobering picture" for patients who try to use available quality rating information.

"Most [rating] systems seem to do a reasonable job at identifying groups of hospitals that perform well on average, yet there is considerable ...

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Chantix works pretty well for smoking cessation. Now they are investigating it's effects for alcohol and possibly gambling and painkiller abuse. This must be music to Pfizer's ears.

Last week, an article brought to light a company that offered "screening" EKG's to asymptomatic patients. My letter in response to this was published today in the Nashua Telegraph:

HealthScreen America's "screening EKG" as described in The Telegraph on July 6 is a microcosm of a disturbingly misleading trend. Contrary to popular belief, more tests do not necessarily equal better medicine.

EKGs certainly have their place in ...

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