Scarlet letters: Doctors involved in a misdiagnosis are publicly named. It seems that up to six physicians evaluated a 29-year old with back pain. Turns out she had Ewing's sarcoma (200 new cases in the US per year).

I think after reading this, a whole lot more back MRIs will be ordered now.

A retired physician longs for the old days of medicine. " The insurance companies and managed health care destroyed doctor-patients relationships. Home visits became economically impossible, while paperwork necessitated the need to hire office personnel.

Managed health care forced life-long patients to go elsewhere. People were forced to spend hours and even days to schedule blood tests and other medical needs."

Chris Rangel gives some sound diet advice.

Hired gun: Ted Frank takes a look at the recent "expert" testimony at the current Vioxx trial. "But what Lucchesi actually opined was that Irvin took Vioxx for 23 days, and that Vioxx was "highly likely" to be responsible for Irvin's death. And it's this opinion that I object to.

What is highly likely? Two-thirds? Four-fifths? Ninety percent? These numbers would translate into relative risks of 3.0, 5.0, and ...

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Not immune: Veterinarians are being sued for malpractice. "'When it came down to it, the doctor made a death decision for this dog rather than provide 24-hour emergency care,' said Breyer, whose Chicago practice is the first in Illinois to focus on animal law."

A physician is accused of advising football players on how to beat drug tests.

Meet "Miss Positive 2005", winner of a beauty pageant for HIV+ women.

File under "they needed a study for this?" - Marijuana raises the risk of car crashes: "In a population-based, case-controlled study of more than 9,000 drivers with known drug and alcohol blood concentrations, he and colleagues found a positive test for cannabis to be associated with a three times greater risk of being responsible for a fatal road crash (odds ratio 3.32, 95% confidence interval 2.63 to 4.18)."

The ethical concerns of the partial face transplant in France. "A French national ethics committee, which has approved partial face transplants but not full ones, has said that 'the very notion of informed consent is an illusion' in such surgery.

'The surgeon cannot make any promises regarding the results of his restorative efforts, which are always dubious,' the committee's report said, adding that 'authentic consent, therefore, will never ...

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Murder meets blogging: MSNBC on the Bordin/Ludwig MySpace profiles. "What does a MySpace profile reveal? And what, if anything, could parents do if they knew about them earlier? If the parents had been aware of the numerous drug references present in Mellie and Maria's profiles, could they have provided them counseling before it was too late?

Would Kara's parents have talked to their daughter earlier if they'd known ...

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Slate on the mishappen PhRMA novel. "Both sides say the deal began to fall apart last July, after Barondess rejected the manuscript on the grounds that it was badly written. Spivak counters that this was Volpe's fault: He claims she insisted that the manuscript include long polemics about drug policy and wanted to dumb the book down to appeal to women, who buy the majority of Canadian drugs." (via ...

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20% of UK primary schools don't have separate changing rooms for boys and girls. "And because of the increasingly earlier sexual maturity of children, the authors question whether this is appropriate, especially as the schools in question had received a large number of requests from the children themselves for separate facilities, say the authors."

"Fixing something that isn't broken." Massachusetts is debating a bill that would prevent doctors self-referring to their own MRI centers.

NY Times - Help is on the way for internet addicts:

These specialists estimate that 6 percent to 10 percent of the approximately 189 million Internet users in this country have a dependency that can be as destructive as alcoholism and drug addiction, and they are rushing to treat it. Yet some in the field remain skeptical that heavy use of the Internet qualifies as a legitimate addiction, and ...

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Playing lawyer games with the recently passed malpractice cap in Florida. "Last year, state voters approved Amendment 3, which places strict limits on the contingency fees that lawyers can earn from representing people who sue doctors, hospitals and other healthcare providers for malpractice. But lawyers have found a way to sidestep the cap: They ask clients to waive their rights under the amendment, allowing the attorneys to collect higher fees.

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Today is World AIDS Day.

Meet the doc behind the first partial face transplant.

Not happy with his malpractice defense, a doctor sues the law firm that defended him.

The next part of the NY Times' excellent "On being a patient" series: Why doctors' don't listen.

Ms. Wong had come across a bane of the medical profession: the difficult doctor. These doctors may be arrogant or rude, highhanded or dismissive. They drive away patients who need help, and some have been magnets for malpractice claims.

And while such doctors have always been part of medicine, medical organizations say ...

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That lovin' feeling: It only lasts a year. "The powerful emotions that bowl over new lovers are triggered by a molecule known as nerve growth factor (NGF), according to Pavia University researchers.

The Italian scientists found far higher levels of NGF in the blood of 58 people who had recently fallen madly in love than in that of a group of singles and people in long-term relationships.

But ...

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