It certainly doesn't lower them, and in fact, may place the physician at more risk:

Finally, some physicians fear that EHRs may actually increase their malpractice exposure, says Gerald "Jud" DeLoss, a health care and malpractice defense attorney with Krahmer and Nielsen in Fairmont, MN. For example, he says, doctors have told him that when their EHRs have online connections with other providers' EHRs, "faulty information that may have been ...

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More real life examples of EHR horror stories.

A primary care practice is finding it hard making ends meet. An obvious problem would be the number of patients each physician is seeing:

One of the reasons revenue might be sluggish, says Falkoff, is that the practice's six physicians each see an average of 16 to 20 patients per day, rather than the 40 or so that would yield hefty profits. "Giving patients a lot of time is ...

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A core tenet of risk management:

That's all the more reason to carefully approach informed consent, that exam room ritual of securing a patient's permission for a test or treatment after discussing its benefits, risks, and alternative measures. If you help a patient form reasonable expectations about a course of action, he's not only in a better position to say Yes or No, but he's also less likely to legally ...

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Proceduralists

"See one, do one, teach one" doesn't cut it in today's malpractice environment. The (rightly) low tolerance for complications stemming from procedures is creating this new field, which focuses on procedures that everybody used to do:

Awaiting both kidney and liver transplants last year, Larry Pritchard suffered from fluid build-up so severe it sometimes leaked from the skin on his stomach. The condition required a procedure known as ...

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Shaving in the OR

keagirl talks about her pre-operative handiwork.

Angry Mike says that's the way it should be:

He feels that the ethics committees agree too often with providers. (He states later that ethics committee at Baylor agreed with the clinicians 43 out of 47 times. Gee, I wonder why.)

I will tell you why: Because they know what they are doing . . .

. . . Additionally, I do not understand AT ALL his ...

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Couz talks about the hospitalist position she took in Canada:

But then the same little hospital that had been courting me to work in emerg presented another option-- they are currently desperate for hospitalist coverage. I can come in for as long as I want, as many days a week as I want and they'll pay me $130/hr to see as many inpatients as I can. They don't seem ...

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It's only getting worse, and compounded by uneven distribution between specialists and PCP's. Don't say I didn't warn you:

While shortages will create difficulties, an even greater problem will arise from the unequal distributions of physicians by specialty and geography, according to the Pricewaterhouse report.

Only 20 percent of today's internal medicine residents are choosing to go into primary care internal medicine; the rest are going on ...

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Politics blatantly ignoring the science? It's so wrong, and Sid Schwab has a few choice words:

. . . dammit, there are some areas in which reality -- not to mention the common good -- ought to trump politics, ideology, and theology. People argue, and I don't disagree, that science isn't the same as policy; that scientists aren't the ones setting political agenda. Fair enough. But when science ...

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Less is more

Yes, stopping medications can sometimes do the trick.

Ezra Klein says if the state-level reforms fail, it will set back the universal care movement. David Catron comments.

If the FDA had approved the claim, pizzerias would have touted that their pizzas could prevent cancer.

Do you think he won the case? Find the outcome here:

. . . a patient presented to an Emergency Department having cut off two fingers with a table saw. The injury occurred at 6:30 p.m. The patient was triaged at 7:19 p.m. The emergency medicine physician saw the patient at 7:42 p.m. X-rays were performed at 11:33 p.m. Orthopedics was finally consulted at 1:00 a.m., more ...

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The fighter against frivolous lawsuits takes on another cause:

I developed Medical Justice, based on a proactive approach, to tackle the problem of frivolous malpractice lawsuits. Since then we've developed a contract-based solution addressing this new threat and are already seeing results. While it is difficult to file suit against the website itself, you can put safeguards into place to prevent defamation on the internet. In other words, there ...

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The tragic cases of neonatal euthanasia in the UK.

What links the two? Hate:

So what would drive these men to such hideous acts of murder?

I believe that it is hate. Hate that is taught to them at a very young age. Hatred of the West. Hatred for Jews. Hatred of infidels or anyone, even Muslims, who do not conform to their view of religion as they imagine it.

Being too careful can also be dangerous.

Thus far, their toned-down, non single-payer proposals are politically smart. Michael Tanner disagrees.

"Prostatempathy"

Despite the evidence, physicians still order screening PSA's to populations that may not need the test. Who tends to be the culprits?

Practitioners who were urology specialists, male, infrequent PSA test orderers, and affiliated with specific hospitals had significantly higher levels of inappropriate PSA screening. Compared with attending physicians, nurses and physician assistants had significantly lower levels of inappropriate screening. Under multivariate modeling, infrequent PSA test ordering and ...

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