Reimbursement:

So why is Monroe County losing physicians? In September 2005, the Monroe County Medical Society, as part of the Rochester Physician Workforce Task Force, interviewed physicians relocating to other communities. Of the several reasons doctors gave for leaving Rochester, the No. 1 reason was low reimbursement.

Little can be done to boost Medicare and Medicaid payments, since those reimbursement rates are set by the federal and state governments, ...

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His gastric bypass surgery had dire complications, and it goes to show that the gray areas of complicated cases lend themselves to questioning:

At the trial of Weis's malpractice lawsuit yesterday, attorney Michael E. Mone asserted in his opening statement that two surgeons involved in the weight-reduction surgery disregarded warning signs that Weis was bleeding internally following the June 14, 2002, operation. Not until June 16, when a nurse ...

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Claims denials from health insurance companies have spawned a growing industry:

"The insurers outcode us, they outsmart us and they have more manpower," says Shari Reynolds, the administrator at Paluxy Valley, which pays athenahealth a little over 3% of the $2.5 million it collects annually from insurers. "Now at least we have a fighting chance."

Doctors increasingly complain that the insurance industry uses complex, opaque claims systems to ...

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A woman claims that hugging her asbestos-exposed father when she was a child led to her mesothelioma.

Keeping audiences on edge to get ratings. (again via Schwitzer health news blog)

He throws his hat into the ring speculating on the cause of death:

SANJAY GUPTA, CNN SR. MEDICAL CORRESPONDENT: There's a lot we don't know as well. 1:38 p.m. is when that nurse activated that 911 call. We don't know how long Anna Nicole Smith had already been down or unconscious at that point. Sounds like what we're hearing, details that have been coming in saying at the time ...

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Like this blogger:

Excuse me, but I don't have health insurance, by choice. And when I or other members of my family get sick, we go to see our doctor and we pay for it out of pocket.

It's cheaper that way.

We don't dump our medical expenses onto our fellow citizens/taxpayers and I have a strong feeling that we're not alone. Surely there are other people who ...

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A doctor is sued after back surgery did not give the appropriate relief to a patient:

The Supreme Court of Kansas recently held that the Kansas Consumer Protection Act (KCPA) can be applied to a physician's professional conduct in providing treatment. Williamson v. Amrani, No. 95,154, 2007 WL 419698 (Kan. Feb. 9, 2007).

The plaintiff sued Dr. Amrani after back surgeries performed by the physician failed to provide the ...

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Not the ideal kind of bedside manner when making a diagnosis of dementia:

My husband is in an early stage of dementia. You hear people say he or she died of dementia. That is not true, is it? And you hear doctors on television say, "As soon as you notice dementia, tell your doctor. The sooner the better."

Well, I did. I told of my husband's early stages that ...

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David Williams talks about the frustrating lag hospitals have in processing paperwork.

What are the odds of both happening?

The life of a real hypochondriac.

Looking at some of the reasons why this may be so:

All this led researchers in the American Journal of Public Health to conclude: "The usefulness of crude infant mortality rates in international comparisons is questionable because of differences in the registration of births and deaths."

The claim that the U.S. fares far worse than other countries on life expectancy suffers a similar problem because it fails to take ...

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Calculations to decide whether the investment is worth it.

About 40 billion dollars for a project doomed to fail in the UK.

That's why codeine is not OTC in the United States.

Amazing.

They're too quiet:

For blind people, crossing the street is becoming even more of a challenge.

Michael Osborn, a blind marketing consultant from Laguna Beach, Calif., and his guide dog, Hastings, were in the middle of an intersection one morning last April when the yellow Lab stopped short. Mr. Osborn took the cue and halted -- just in time to feel the breeze from a car passing right ...

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John Mack analyzes the results.

Stents and other interventional cardiology procedures are putting on the squeeze.

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