Graham takes issue with Dr. Reece's bashing of the NY Times yesterday:

I think they [the American public] want their health care to work like I want my electricity does"“when I flick the switch, the light should go on. That is, if Medicare or a single-payer or whoever can keep the level of quality and choice the same but provide coverage to everybody, then we should all get it.
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Here's what Paul Levy did yesterday.

Sid Schwab pulls back the curtain and takes you on a guided tour of what it's like to perform surgery.

A look at some recent data from an oncologist's point of view.

A significant proportion of internal medicine residents wrongly assume that dietary supplements are regulated by the FDA:

More than a third of those who took the quiz wrongly believed that dietary supplements had to be approved by the FDA before being sold. Attending physicians fared better than the overall group, though 15% still thought supplements required FDA approval. And roughly 60% of both residents and attending physicians were unaware ...

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No surprise to regular readers of this blog: "With the malpractice situation, the rules of the road for physicians, quite understandably, are, 'When in doubt, do the test.'" (via EconLog)

Think about this next time you're called in to help out in the OR:

Dr. Inder Khokha, a general surgeon at Mercy Medical Center in Williston, assisted in the removal of a kidney from Rosie Chamley in February 2004. During the operation, Chamley's vena cava was damaged and she died five days later at another hospital . . .

. . . Chamley was originally admitted to Mercy ...

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Of course not, says Richard Reece:

It all comes down to altitude and attitude. From their lofty perch, The New York Time's editorial staff has yet to tumble to the reality America is basically a conservative nation, distrusts centralized government, wants choices of care and providers, demands access to the wonders of high tech medicine, and believes a market-based system, with all its faults, such as profits for entrepreneurial ...

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John Mack discusses how Big Pharma is grappling with Web 2.0.

Some are going overboard with HIPAA:

Many organizations have erred on the side of overcompliance, adding unnecessary red tape, confusing their patients and needlessly impeding the flow of information. One group uses six different HIPAA authorization forms for different circumstances. Some have even purchased restaurant-style beepers to notify waiting patients, instead of calling out their names.

Their use is increasing to introduce some predictability in jury cases.

Thanks to FPM for the mention of this blog.

More primary care grimness from John Gordon. Making re-certification harder for primary care isn't going to help:

You have to love a group of people who, faced with immense economic pressures, decide to make their board certification five times harder. There's a definite impulse to self-punishment among family physicians ...

A video short from a leading medical illustration company.

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(via Street Anatomy)

"I was lucky," he says. Indeed.

Grace-Marie Turner suggests that the expansion of retail clinics is simply free market at work:

Much like the response to Hurricane Katrina, private companies are far ahead of the government in answering Americans' needs, this time for more accessible and more affordable health care. Political leaders across the country seeking to expand government's role in health care should take note . . .

. . . With many ...

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The WSJ takes a look at what happened in Illinois:

The Democratic House in Springfield killed the proposal, 107-0, after Mr. Blagojevich came out against his own idea when it became clear he was going to be humiliated . . .

. . . Easily re-elected in November, the Governor used every trick in the "progressive" political playbook to sell his proposal. Instead of a general tax increase, ...

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He has been hospitalized for a heart attack. Get well soon and have a speedy recovery.

Dr. RW explains the bias against scientific rigor when it comes to alternative therapies.

It's safe to say that if you're in health IT, there will always be a job for you in Massachusetts:

Massachusetts is among the leaders nationally in the use of electronic patient records and computerized drug prescribing. But its workforce is not keeping pace: The state lacks enough people who know how computers work and who understand how doctors diagnose and treat diseases.

It is a unique blend ...

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