Wikipedia and medicine

Clinical Cases looks at some of the problems and controversies facing the The Medicine Portal at Wikipedia. My guess is that, like the other Wikipedia topics, it will sort itself out. Eventually.

Physician and hospital critics are starting to sprout in the blogosphere. Carol Kirschner and Dale Hunscher examine the damaging impact.

Beware single-payer

"In A Short Course in Brain Surgery, filmmaker Stuart Browning shows the callousness of 'single-payer', government-run health care systems as practiced in Ontario, Canada. His film highlights the plight of Lindsay McCreith, an Ontario man with a cancerous brain tumor who went to Buffalo, NY to receive the timely medical care that is rationed in his home country."

Required viewing.

height="350" width="425">
Read more...

The range of ER activity widely ranges, depending on what part of the country you're in.

A Wal-Mart "optometrist" is caught impersonating his former partner. He got caught when he illegally parked in a handicap spot.

Ball-point pen in eye



(via Radiology Picture of the Day)

The yearly reimbursement circus continues. Again, physicians were lucky that Medicare cuts were held off for another year. It was getting dicey.

The famous case of Richard Paey. His appeal was denied:

Richard Paey is a wheelchair-bound father of three young children.

He has no prior criminal record-- in fact, he's an Ivy League law school graduate. He has not one, but two extensively documented and excruciatingly painful chronic disorders: multiple sclerosis and chronic back pain due to an injury suffered in a car accident that was treated by ...

Read more...

The more elaborate one, in this study that compares sugar pills vs sham acupuncture for chronic pain:

Performing acupuncture is more elaborate than prescribing medicine. Other rituals that may make patients feel better include'white coats, and stethoscopes that you don't necessarily use, pictures on the wall, the way you reassure a patient, and the secretaries that sign you in.' Careful manipulation of such rituals could make all types of ...

Read more...

Like many, I was closely following the James Kim tragedy. Here is a media alert from a physician trying to capitalize from this story. (via Gawker)

On a non-medicine related note, this blog points to a story wondering whether Google was responsible for his death:

When using the Yahoo Maps, MapQuest and Google Maps online services to plot directions from Grants Pass to Gold Beach, Yahoo and ...

Read more...

Amy Tuteur points out that midwives will soon undergo the same malpractice pressures as OBs:

In that year, there were 459 monetary judgments against CNMs. There were many more malpractice suits, but 459 resulted in a win for the plaintiff and payment of money. The average payout for a strictly obsetrics related claim was approximately $532,000. It is difficult to interpret the information for the size of monetary damages ...

Read more...

A suggested reason why there is a 20 percent failure rate in India:

Condoms designed to meet international size specifications are too big for many Indian men as their penises fall short of what manufacturers had anticipated, an Indian study has found.

The Indian Council of Medical Research, a leading state-run centre, said its initial findings from a two-year study showed 60 percent of men in the financial capital ...

Read more...

Luckily there was an OB on board.

Bribes for referrals

A psychiatric center is accused of bribing local doctors to bring in referrals.

They have a category for best medical/health blog this year. Congratulations to all.

PharmaGossip with thorough coverage.

Analysis from nature.com:

But it is also possible that the whole idea of blocking CETP is flawed, says Moti Kashyap, who directs atherosclerosis research at the VA Medical Center in Long Beach, California.

When HDLs excrete cholesterol in the liver, they actually rely on LDLs for part of this process. So inhibiting CETP, which prevents the transfer of cholesterol from HDL to LDL, might actually cause an abnormal ...

Read more...

. . . due to a town's healthy eating habits.

A patient expresses frustration and how her doctor reports lab results. His "no news is good news" philosophy is terrible advice. Physicians review several hundred lab, radiology and consultants' notes per day. There will be times where abnormal values slip through the cracks.

Who really pays for jackpot verdicts and multi-million dollar settlements? Not the doctor nor hospital, but society as a whole:

Medical malpractice insurance is even more problematic. Every doctor with the same type of practice pays the same as every other doctor in that same type of practice. The world's best surgeon pays the same price as a night-school butcher surgeon. What this means is that good doctors pay ...

Read more...

Most Popular