Edwin Leap with a must-read on the likelihood of physicians committing suicide after being sued:

Let's reach out to everyone who gets sued. Give them a handshake or embrace, a friendly smile and an understanding ear. Remind them of all the good they have done, and of all the good they have yet to do. And we should tell them the stories of our own lawsuits so they won't ...

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Robert Centor says too many students choose specialties based on lifestyle and money:

I also worry about medical student specialty choice. Too many students seem to look at money and call schedule. I guess some students lose their love for medicine, and just view it as a job. I worry that many students choose a specialty for the wrong reasons, and I predict dissatisfaction 15-20 years after finishing their residency.

How they can adversely affect care for others in the emergency room.

Plastic surgeon Tony Youn speculates.

"Schools of health"

The CDC head suggests that doctors, nurses, veterinarians, pharmacists and dentists should all start education at one common school:

"If we are seriously thinking about building a health system, then we need to be training professionals in a collegial and collaborative manner."

P4P for drugs

So-called "risk-sharing" pricing schemes are being discussed to justify high drug prices:

Johnson & Johnson has proposed that Britain's national health service pay for the cancer drug Velcade, but only for people who benefit from the medicine, which can cost $48,000 a patient. The company would refund any money spent on patients whose tumors do not shrink sufficiently after a trial treatment.

The groundbreaking proposal, along with less ...

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Newer drugs are not being used in lymphoma treatment. There are financial incentives on both sides of the debate.

Rounding by robot

Robots are found to decrease hospital length of stays in post-op patients. Further demise of the physical exam?

The pain specialist gets 5 years.

It's fear of Friday the 13th. Have a nice day. (via Maria)

Doctors are starting to refer high-risk patients to others:

Our recent survey shows that 70.2 percent refer high-risk patients to other specialists and are limiting their scope of practice. This hurts the most acutely ill patients.

Gladwell is right on the money with his approach to reform:

He described Picasso as a conceptual innovator who revolutionized art with his transformative ideas. "He had big, bold, grand ideas," Gladwell said, which the artist then executed fairly quickly. Cezanne, on the other hand, was an experimental painter who used a trial-and-error approach and went about his work slowly. Gladwell said the two approaches of imposing genius in the ...

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There is a mild improvement in medical patients, but none for surgical patients:

"Before the regulations, 60 out of every 1,000 medical patients died. After the regulations, the number of deaths was 57 or 58 out of every 1,000," said the study's lead author, Kanaka Shetty . . .

. . . Another 200,000 surgical patients were also examined, but the new rules did not seem to have an ...

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It's not as bad as some people think:

A breeze was an overstatement. I can honestly say that if it made medical sense to get one done every year, i would have no problem with it. It was easy and breezy :).

Once I got into the Gastro Room where they did these, they told me that they were going to knock me out, and I would get ...

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The co-inventor of the rotavirus vaccine takes exception to Pharma's portrayal in Sicko:

Mr. Moore could have framed the real problems with pharmaceutical companies by asking the right questions. How can we eliminate marketing practices that unduly influence clinicians by providing unethical incentives? Does direct-to-consumer advertising mislead the public by creating the notion of magic medicines without side effects? Do we benefit from companies developing yet another hair-loss or ...

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Millions are being spent to protect profits patents:

Generic drugs are the centerpiece of efforts to tame growth in America's prescription-drug bill, which topped $270 billion in 2006. When a doctor writes a prescription for a brand-name drug, pharmacists are usually permitted in most states to make an automatic switch to a generic judged equivalent by the FDA.

The epilepsy legislation would carve out an exception to that ...

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This is probably a first.

Some reactions from the public that don't agree with Moore. Which is why his visions of health care utopia will be difficult to enact:

Many Americans remain firmly opposed to universal care.

"We are not a socialist country .... If our system is so poor, how is it we have one of the highest standards of living in the world?" asked Cincinnati electrician and businessman Mike Cavanaugh, ...

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It's up to nine.

An important point that Michael Moore left out:

I pretend to go on a journey, like Moore, to discover how other countries handle the malpractice lottery. It turns out they have great answers for that as well. Without tort reform and malpractice insurance reform, doctors in this country will continue to order tests to cover their asses instead of being cautious but fiscally responsible. This issue is real and adds ...

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