David Carr is not impressed:

As it turns out, the Web's penchant for polarized discourse is not just something that flares up over the war in Iraq or presidential elections. And because the Avandia controversy manages to unite three sectors not held in the highest public esteem "” Big Pharma, Big Media and Big Government (the lawyers will be along any minute) "” it has led to a lot ...

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Currently medical mistakes are still being paid for. Medicare is seeking to change that:

The initial six conditions include: pressure ulcers, two hospital-acquired infections (catheter-associated urinary tract infections and Staphylococcus aureus septicemia) and three "never events" (air embolism, blood incompatibility and object left behind in surgical patient).

Can you put a dollar value to it? Some have already:

Studies of real-world situations produce relatively consistent results, suggesting that average Americans value a year of life at $100,000 to $300,000, said Peter J. Neumann, director of a program at Tufts-New England Medical Center that measures the cost-effectiveness of new treatments.

Kidney dialysis treatment provides another data point to suggest that estimate is fair. Keeping a ...

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Shrink Rap thinks she would have been better off in home detention:

She was being kept in a single cell because of her celebrity status, but she was seen crying and not eating there. Most completed correctional suicides are done by inmates in single cell status. The facility would have had a reasonable concern about maintaining her safety under these circumstances. One option would have been to put her ...

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The Cheerful Oncologist with eight tips.

A follow-up to their piece written a few months ago, focusing on the medical blogger Code of Ethics.

The Las Vegas Review Journal gets it right as it mocks the opinion of a management professor:

"This is basically the way medicine works in a Third World country," Temple University health care management professor David Barton Smith told The AP. "There's no acknowledgement of any universal right to health care."

Of course, there is no universal "right" to health care. A true right doesn't impose an obligation on ...

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David Hogberg in the Washington Times:

In nations where the government provides universal health insurance -- such as Canada, Sweden and the United Kingdom -- there are few restraints on citizens' demand for health care. This leads to many citizens overusing health care and creates a strain on government budgets. To keep the costs from exploding, those governments must restrict access to health care by using waiting lists, canceling surgeries ...

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Hospitals mostly relying on Medicare and Medicaid are dead in the water:

This is what happens when you allow Washington bureaucrats to "control" costs by arbitrarily deciding what a medical service is worth rather than allowing the market to determine the correct price. Providers of care disappear. If we allow these bureaucrats to take over the entire system, the inevitable result will be widespread provider shortages.

Instead of malpractice reform, they are focusing on financially ensnaring doctors to stay within the state.

Doctor rating websites seem to be getting a free pass, and is being called positive for health information transparency.

But lawyer rating websites are causing an uproar:

According to the Seattle Times' blog, on June 7 -- just two days after Avvo publicly launched as a lawyer rating service -- a local criminal defense lawyer, John Henry Browne, threw the lawyer's equivalent of a temper tantrum.

Drug reps admit to skimping on storage for drug samples.

Lawyers are fighting to be at the front of the line:

Lanier said the day the article was published he got calls from three lawyers around the country who wanted to broker Avandia cases they expected to pull in through advertising.

This illustrates the division of labor among personal injury lawyers, he said, between "chicken catchers" who advertise and "chicken pluckers" who generally don't advertise but take cases to ...

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The public wants to be shielded from how much health care costs. David Hogberg says that ain't happening, whether you like it or not:

Sorry, but expecting money to play no part in health care decisions is like asking for the law of gravity to be suspended.

If you decide that you don't want to make decisions regarding how much of your money to spend on health care, someone ...

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Stanley Feld takes exception:

The term healthcare provider, in my view, has been constructed to decrease the value of physicians. The goal is to decrease reimbursement and distribute reimbursement for medical care delivered by physicians to others. The physician is now in the same category as the nurse, nurse practitioner, physician assistant, pharmacist, physical therapist, occupational therapist and dietician, to name a few. We are all referred to as ...

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Why health makes for a perfect industry for Moore to attack:

I'm not saying that anyone in his film is faking or exaggerating their medical problems, but how can anyone know that? Medical records are sealed by law. Moore's got people who can say or do anything and no one can check the facts. The American doctors and health-insurance companies he attacks have no voice either because they're restricted by ...

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An op-ed in the Boston Globe:

. . . there are few, if any, incentives to prudently control the cost of medical treatment. It is well documented that retirees will undertake treatment as long as the value of that care is more than the co payment for which they are responsible. As for providers of medical care, such as doctors, nurses, and hospitals, any desire to restrain costs through ...

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Scott Shreeve takes a critical look at Sermo. Bob Coffield comments from a health-law perspective:

As these new health care business models evolve they raise all sorts of interesting legal questions for health care lawyers. For example, what impact will the recent outing of flea have on the reluctance of physicians to post recommendations/comments on sites like Sermo? Could specific content posts by physicians ultimately be used ...

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Hospice Blog feels he needs to tone down his entries:

Effective now, I will no longer be posting original thoughts and opinions on hospiceblog. I will continue to link to interesting third-party information and news. I would love to have people write posts on subjects of their choosing and I will put them on the blog for the world to see and evaluate. The days for me to do that ...

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A case of a rare congenital disorder with a man was born without the lower half of his face.

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