Some are saying that the inappropriately-high C-section rate is one reason:

Some researchers point to the rising C-section rate, now 29 percent of all births - far higher than what public health experts say is appropriate. Like other surgeries, Caesareans come with risks related to anesthesia, infections and blood clots.

"There's an inherent risk to C-sections," said Dr. Elliott Main, who co-chairs a panel reviewing obstetrics care in California. ...

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Do they reflect what matters to most Americans?

The WHO rankings have more to do with what liberals value in a health care system (fairness, equality, etc.) than what most Americans value in a health care system (quality, access, efficiency, innovation, convenience). Though this doesn't stop people like Mr. Moore from trying to convince everyone that these apples are really oranges.

It can be a problem when the many of the refill requests are for controlled substances.

"Save Grady"

A film to save the troubled Atlanta hospital. (via The Medical Quack)

Anna Pou speaks

She tells her side of the story to Newsweek:

I actually felt sorry for Mr. Foti. What he did was so unprecedented and is typically not done. I know he had his reasons for doing it, but I just felt sorry that he couldn't accept or respect the grand jury's decision. Most prosecutors, if they don't agree, they accept the grand jury's decision graciously. Basically he didn't show any respect ...

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A man undergoes the procedure to keep his adopted child:

A man who weighed 558 pounds when a Missouri judge prevented him from adopting a child he and his wife had taken into their home underwent gastric bypass surgery Friday in a bid to win the child back.

Gary Stocklaufer, a 34-year-old truck driver, and his wife claim a judge unfairly discriminated against them because of his weight in ...

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Is UnitedHealth playing the ACP for a bunch of fools?

UnitedHealth Group is simply responding to the request by the ACP for a "new model" of primary care by giving them what they want. But you can put lipstick on a pig all day long and it's still a pig. Whether you call it medical home, pay for performance, or just plain managed care, as long as the big insurers ...

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Should physician-bloggers be held to a higher standard?

So the question remains: should physician bloggers, including those who anonymously post, be required to meet certain standards in their postings, just as they are required to meet certain standards within their practice? If so, who becomes the upholder of these ethical guidelines?

A handy guide for patients when they see studies discussed in the media.

Make sure your informed consent forms are clear enough:

The informed consent form described the surgery as a "lumbar diskectomy and fusion with iliac crest bone graft + 'Steffe plates.' " During the surgery the physicians removed bone fragments and grafted the plaintiff's own bone to his spine. They also used cadaver bone as dowels for the bone graft. The grafted bone didn't fuse and the patient's workers' compensation carrier ...

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Walk-ins

Love 'em or hate 'em, people who show up without an appointment can help or hurt your practice:

. . . walk-ins are a fact of life in office-based medicine, so rules to deal with them are essential. Walk-in policies will vary from practice to practice, and even from physician to physician within a practice, depending on who's on call, who's looking for a heftier patient roster, and what sort ...

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She was born with osteogenesis imperfecta:

Little Sarah Morrison is so delicate she can never be hugged by her parents and she can break a bone just by sneezing.

Before she was even born, Sarah suffered 30 rib fractures and doctors said she would live just two days.

But the one-in-a-million baby, who has brittle-bone disease, will defy expectations when she celebrates her first birthday ...

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ADHD DTC ads

Targeting the back to school crowd.

Hate waiting at the doctor's office? Don't blame the players, advocate to change the way physicians are paid:

As long as we are paid per visit rather than for our time, we will have this problem. Usually patients have no choice, because there are few good alternatives. These problems are common to most physicians.

For many specialties, we do not have enough physicians - so the "competitor" ...

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And 9 other things that doctors like to hear from patients.

Orac doesn't mince words with his take on Medicare's poorly thought-out plan:

It would make a lot more sense to set standards for the maximum rates of these particular infectious complications for each hospital based on the mix of patients and the rates that could reasonably be expected if the best evidence-based infection control guidelines are used. Hospitals that exceed that rate by, say, two standard deviations (or even less) ...

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Followup to yesterday's story on doctor-staffed retail clinics. A sly move by the hospital to generate revenue increase admissions?

They will be able to increase admissions to the hospitals, since these pharmacy docs have admitting privileges. So if they lose it on one end, they'll get it back on the other. Good for them. It's this kind of entrepreneurial thinking that makes me proud to be an ...

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The Physician Executive with some answers:

I suspect, while there are some bad apples in the barrel, the majority are skating trying to cover their overhead, payroll, malpractice and hopefully come close to the national average of $150,000 in income.

Going bare

keagirl with her thoughts on the matter:

I recently talked to someone who has "gone bare", and they have posted a sign in their clinic saying that this medical group does NOT carry malpractice insurance. If patients have a problem with that, they will most likely go somewhere else. I'm guessing that this will help weed out patients who may have litiginous intents, but I am also guessing that ...

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Hospital credit cards

The WSJ Health Blog looks at the fine print.

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