Simply a sign of the times. (via The Medical Quack)

The hospital is becoming a dangerous place to work. Take this harmonica that a patient fashioned into a weapon:

Derek Lowe says they are being cautious due to the side effect profile. But it's available in Mexico.

Imaging trees:

Gazo is overseeing a summer project at a northern Indiana lumber mill filled this spring with a CT scanner that's comparing logs cut after being subjected to the high-resolution X-ray scans with logs cut after being sized up the traditional way.

He said the technology could have a big impact on the hardwood industry if it proves effective optimizing the extraction of high quality wood from logs. ...

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That's some mighty ignorant thinking, which is why the individual mandate makes sense:

Almost half of the roughly 400,000 uninsured people in Massachusetts are single males, and many young men think "health insurance is for sissies," Mr. Kingsdale said. Because young males are generally healthy, adding them to the pool of insured would most likely reduce the average cost of coverage over all, given that this particular group is ...

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Doctors take all the risk, while insurers reap most of the benefits:

Dr. Baron's office has saved money "” in transcribing medical reports, for example "” and his practice now handles its 6,000 patients with three fewer office employees. He described other benefits, mainly the ability to find information quickly for patients, hospitals, insurers and labs with a few keystrokes.

The technology, Dr. Baron said, has also helped ...

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A student does an experiment at his school. Guess which came out cleaner?

David Carr is not impressed:

As it turns out, the Web's penchant for polarized discourse is not just something that flares up over the war in Iraq or presidential elections. And because the Avandia controversy manages to unite three sectors not held in the highest public esteem "” Big Pharma, Big Media and Big Government (the lawyers will be along any minute) "” it has led to a lot ...

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Currently medical mistakes are still being paid for. Medicare is seeking to change that:

The initial six conditions include: pressure ulcers, two hospital-acquired infections (catheter-associated urinary tract infections and Staphylococcus aureus septicemia) and three "never events" (air embolism, blood incompatibility and object left behind in surgical patient).

Can you put a dollar value to it? Some have already:

Studies of real-world situations produce relatively consistent results, suggesting that average Americans value a year of life at $100,000 to $300,000, said Peter J. Neumann, director of a program at Tufts-New England Medical Center that measures the cost-effectiveness of new treatments.

Kidney dialysis treatment provides another data point to suggest that estimate is fair. Keeping a ...

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Shrink Rap thinks she would have been better off in home detention:

She was being kept in a single cell because of her celebrity status, but she was seen crying and not eating there. Most completed correctional suicides are done by inmates in single cell status. The facility would have had a reasonable concern about maintaining her safety under these circumstances. One option would have been to put her ...

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The Cheerful Oncologist with eight tips.

A follow-up to their piece written a few months ago, focusing on the medical blogger Code of Ethics.

The Las Vegas Review Journal gets it right as it mocks the opinion of a management professor:

"This is basically the way medicine works in a Third World country," Temple University health care management professor David Barton Smith told The AP. "There's no acknowledgement of any universal right to health care."

Of course, there is no universal "right" to health care. A true right doesn't impose an obligation on ...

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David Hogberg in the Washington Times:

In nations where the government provides universal health insurance -- such as Canada, Sweden and the United Kingdom -- there are few restraints on citizens' demand for health care. This leads to many citizens overusing health care and creates a strain on government budgets. To keep the costs from exploding, those governments must restrict access to health care by using waiting lists, canceling surgeries ...

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Hospitals mostly relying on Medicare and Medicaid are dead in the water:

This is what happens when you allow Washington bureaucrats to "control" costs by arbitrarily deciding what a medical service is worth rather than allowing the market to determine the correct price. Providers of care disappear. If we allow these bureaucrats to take over the entire system, the inevitable result will be widespread provider shortages.

Instead of malpractice reform, they are focusing on financially ensnaring doctors to stay within the state.

Doctor rating websites seem to be getting a free pass, and is being called positive for health information transparency.

But lawyer rating websites are causing an uproar:

According to the Seattle Times' blog, on June 7 -- just two days after Avvo publicly launched as a lawyer rating service -- a local criminal defense lawyer, John Henry Browne, threw the lawyer's equivalent of a temper tantrum.

Drug reps admit to skimping on storage for drug samples.

Lawyers are fighting to be at the front of the line:

Lanier said the day the article was published he got calls from three lawyers around the country who wanted to broker Avandia cases they expected to pull in through advertising.

This illustrates the division of labor among personal injury lawyers, he said, between "chicken catchers" who advertise and "chicken pluckers" who generally don't advertise but take cases to ...

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