Can it be useful? John Ford takes a look at the ramifications.

Niko Karvounis expounds on Jay Parkinson's HIPAA rant:

So if they're not enforced, what is the point of HIPAA's privacy stipulations? Parkinson and others have an idea: the creation of new market opportunities for potential profiteers. Instituting PHI measures makes compliance a huge problem (at least on paper) in need of new solutions"”i.e. new technologies, consultation, and contracts . . .

. . . It's clear that the scope ...

Read more...

Unbelievable that it went this far:

A doctor can't be held liable for resuscitating a baby who was born without a heartbeat and survived with severe disabilities, the state Supreme Court says.

The baby's parents filed a malpractice lawsuit after the baby's 2004 birth. They claimed doctors in Vancouver, Wash., were negligent when they continued to resuscitate the baby for almost half an hour, after he was born without ...

Read more...

Pallimed comments on this issue, and other articles from the world of palliative medicine.

Some medical schools in Europe are using sophisticated virtual anatomy lessons. Here's a sample pic:

A more glaring example of the rush to put quality measures before the data?

Free = more utilization

Common sense straight-talk on how to fix things:

Turn FREE into EXPENSIVE for the patient, not the sytem, and you fix the sytem. Only then will you cause a massive shift in the entitelment mentality and force upon this country the necessary evil.

Real doctors?

Does the medical profession ridiculously disparage their own?

I cannot tell you how many times I have heard physicians (people with an MD) refer to other types of MDs as "fake doctors." The two most commonly cited groups I hear this about is psychiatrists and physiatrists. Psychiatry is put down because they see "mental health patients" and do not perform surgery. Physiatrists (who are rehabilitation medicine doctors) are often put ...

Read more...

A SCHIP-like referendum in Oregon should give those advocating more government in health care some pause:

Oregon reproduced the current Schip fracas in D.C. on the state level -- and the referendum took a major shellacking, with voters siding three to two against . . .

. . . We're surprised the Governor thinks voters in his left-leaning state are so easily gulled -- especially in a contest ...

Read more...

9p21 mutation

Screening for this genetic mutation increasing the risk of heart attack was a big hit at the recent AHA meetings.

Medicine is an art, and is that something any "provider" can give?

No painter, no matter who hard they try will ever be able to paint the exact same painting, ever. Anne, you are my painting, for which my artistic brush has created, what I believe, to be the best possible picture of health, based my my artistic abilities. You are different from every other person on this earth. ...

Read more...

How a psychiatrist decides what to do.

Dying for your religion

Orac comments on case of postpartum hemorrhage in a Jehovah's witness:

Meanwhile, her surviving family and friends try to blame the doctors for not doing a C-section, rather than placing blame where the blame should be placed: On teaching by their religion of a ridiculous interpretation of scripture beyond what could possibly have been meant and on Mrs. Gough's decision to follow that twisted interpretation unto death.

And how they are able to do it.

Hypertension in the ER

Are all elevated blood pressure readings an emergency?

Just another day in an OR in Iraq.

Dr. Wes argues they can't be totally prevented, no matter how hard we try:

Errors, as difficult and as unfortunate as they may be, remain critical to our development as doctors. Although no one wants them to occur, they do have benefits to developing a mature perspective and technique to medical practice. Critical review of inevitable medical errors should remain a critical part of our medical school curricula.


Read more...

Diabetes Mine continues to stir the pot, analyzing a recent speech by the ADA's Richard Kahn. Dr. RW gives his take.

Jenkem

A desperate ploy to get high, or a hoax?

Police in Naples, Fla., are on the lookout for users of "jenkem," a homemade drug created by allowing human urine and feces to ferment in a bottle with a balloon covering the opening. Users inhale the released methane gas from the balloon to get a "euphoric high similar to ingesting cocaine, but with strong hallucinations of times past," according to ...

Read more...

Home testing for obstructive sleep apnea was recently approved. Will this kill off the field of sleep medicine?

Most Popular