Backlash continues on Michael Moore's Cuba stunt, with some revealing pictures:

Only, it isn't the best. Not near it. Those foreigners and wealthy people who go to Cuba, including the people that Michael Moore are bringing down, are only shown the few top of the line facilities which probably are some of the best in the world. It's a huge propaganda campaign aimed at deceiving people into believing that Cuba ...

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A story in today's WSJ questions Gardasil's efficacy:

But behind the scenes, Gardasil has been dogged by uncertainty about how effective it really is. Merck won approval for the vaccine based on research that showed it protected against two strains of the human papillomavirus, known as HPV 16 and 18, that are thought to cause 70% of cervical-cancer cases. The Food and Drug Administration didn't ask its panel of ...

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Bruce Kesler points out that the majority are quite happy with their health care:

As I pointed out here, the Trojan Horse of the uninsured is overstated, to propel nationalized health care, and used to undermine the health care of 80% of Americans. The latest poll of the privately insured (consistent with many other polls), for example,
. . . found most U.S. workers are very satisfied with their ...

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One stunt is detailed in the NY Post. Get ready for some single-payer love in his upcoming film:

Filmmaker Michael Moore's production company took ailing Ground Zero responders to Cuba in a stunt aimed at showing that the U.S. health-care system is inferior to Fidel Castro's socialized medicine, according to several sources with knowledge of the trip . . .

. . . But the sick sojourn, ...

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More are not willing to take the risks of specialty call in the ER. So hospitals are starting to show them the money:

Until recently, specialists accepted on-call shifts in return for admitting privileges. But many now expect to be compensated for keeping their beepers on during nights and weekends. The change in the relationship between specialists and hospitals is being debated in the medical community, with ...

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How to buy an M.D.

Two "anti-aging" osteopaths find a way to add M.D. after their names. Are they afraid of not selling enough books with their D.O. degree?

Both men received medical degrees in 1998 from the Central American Health Sciences University in Belize, without, they acknowledged, ever having studied in the country. Dr. Klatz and Dr. Goldman say through their lawyer that they earned their medical degrees with transfer credit from ...

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"Just admit the patient to medicine."

Been there, done that. It's the only service in the hospital that can't refuse admissions. Scalpel with another example.

Wear your seatbelts

Or else:

There are two major routes that unrestrained persons take in a front-end MVA (Motor Vehicle Accident). Up-and-over or down-and-under (AKA "submarining"). With up-and-over, the upper body launches forward and up. The head strikes the windshield. (This produces the classic "windshield star") Your injuries here include concussion, scalp laceration, and various brain bleeds. You can suspect fractured cervical vertebrae (and if you have a fracture with compromise to ...

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Believe it or not, one point me and Ezra Klein agree on. Even with his socialist views, he admits that cost-sharing is inevitable. Finally, a bit of reality is sinking into the liberal thinkers:

But even though conservatives have embraced a crude, even regressive, form of cost-sharing, there's a kernel of insight to their account. In 1965, the average American received a bit under $1,000 in health ...

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Childhood obesity

Solutions to a pressing health problem are fighting an uphill battle:

But across the country, the new rules are also sparking a backlash among parents, children and even some teachers and school officials. The efforts often draw derision for being too extreme and demonizing children. Arkansas, the first state to pass legislation requiring schools measure students' body-mass index, backtracked last month and now allows parents to refuse the assessment. The ...

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Orac takes stock of his critical injuries. Wear your seatbelts people:

Corzine required seven units of blood and needed to undergo surgery to fix his femur. Even if he does not suffer complications from his chest injury, such as pneumonia and ARDS, he will likely not be able to walk again for months, and will require more surgeries to wash out the damaged and devitalized tissue and to complete the ...

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Blogs are exclusively responsible for the current AstraZeneca scandal:

Where was the mainstream media in all this? Almost entirely absent. But already, the episode signals a new chapter in the way the pharmaceutical industry is being scrutinized and to whom drugmakers must answer, like it or not. Blogs, whether run by whistleblowers, marketers, patients or journalists, are a new front. And there's no going back.
Peter Rost and Ed ...

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They come up with an asinine medical dispensing rule. Shadowfax and Kim at Emergiblog vent. Once again, those that make the rules don't live in the real world.

VA’s EHR

The strongest point of the VA system is their EHR. I used it extensively during medical school, and really is the only feature that should be copied from the VA system. DB and #1 Dinosaur comment on a Washington Post article.

The NY Times on hip resurfacing, a growing alternative to hip replacement. UnitedHealth apparently is behind the curve:

He said his insurer, United Healthcare, initially denied coverage because he wanted to go out of the approved doctors' network and that several of the United representatives whom he spoke with on the phone were confused because they had never heard of the procedure. United eventually provided oral approval. Mr. ...

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It's seems inevitable that out-of-pocket expenses will soon be a reality in the UK's health care system.

If you thought the price of prescription drugs, you're missing more important factors. Charlie Baker explains.

Paul Levy notices an interesting trend of patient falls at his hospital.

Washington's pharmacy board unanimously ruled that pharmacists have a duty to fill prescriptions despite any personal objections.

Ezra Klein thinks so, but his arguments get taken apart.

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