They're going to restate earnings. More from Health Care Renewal:

We have discussed how early advocates of managed care called for "breaking up the [physicians] guild" and handing the power to run health care over to managers and bureaucrats, like those who run UnitedHealth. Now people in the investment world may be starting to understand what managers and bureaucrats have done with this power. We physicians on the ...

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This time, it's a drug for dogs that's in trouble:

When reports of illness and death linked to the drug surfaced not long after it went on the market, the company was slow to report the problems to the Food and Drug Administration. The agency eventually did issue a reprimand and a formal warning letter, but two years later the drug is still being sold, and some consumers complain that too ...

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Should've at least done a set of cardiac enzymes. In the US, he would have been admitted for sure:

Mr Wade left hospital at 5.05pm but because of traffic and a detour to drop off another patient, it was 5.50pm by the time he got home. Miss Wade said by then he was quite breathless. He had some food but his condition deteriorated and an ambulance was called. ...

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A doctor tries to smuggle ecstasy by taping the drugs to his scrotum.

It seems to be a weekly occurrence. There should be a study done about this.

Another obese patient has his feelings hurt:

When the surgeon came in, he asked if I knew why my back was hurting. I told him that for 30 years, I'd had a job lifting heavy things and it had taken its toll. The doctor looked at me and said, "I think you have always eaten too much."

I told him most of my family was built large. He said, ...

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It's been awhile since we've had a story worthy of "Doctors gone wild":

A 55-year-old doctor has been released from jail following his arrest for investigation of assaulting an elderly man and kicking his dog, authorities said Thursday.

Bruce Allen Runyon of Redlands was arrested Tuesday at Loma Linda University Medical Center, where he teaches medicine. He was freed after posting $50,000 bail, sheriff's Det. Michael Pelky said ...

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Hey, it worked:

A provocative advertisement featuring a bright red push-up bra symbolized the fierce opposition to a small business health insurance bill that collapsed in the Senate on Thursday.

The advertisement, by the American Cancer Society, seemed to pop off the pages of newspapers and Internet screens for the past week in a three-dimensional way. "Don't Let the U.S. Senate Leave Women Exposed," it warned of the ...

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A bioethicist says no:

"Death seems more tragic when a child or young adult dies than an elderly person -- not because the lives of older people are less valuable, but because the younger person has not had the opportunity to live and develop through all stages of life," Drs. Ezekiel Emanuel and Alan Wertheimer wrote for today's issue of the journal Science.

Sad to see her go. (via shrinkette)

I harped on this before, now another physician feels the same way:

As a practicing general internist, I feel like an endangered species.

I am in my mid-50s, and planning my retirement. I have watched many of my colleagues leave the practice of general internal medicine, and I have seen few younger colleagues replace them.

There are many factors that cause general internists to leave the practice, ...

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Great story from the WSJ.

It's part of Google Co-op. MedGadget with more details.

A view from the other side (NEJM - subscription required). This time it's George Annas, the medical ethicist and JD from Boston, with a dissenting view on the malpractice problem:

Like most defendants in tort litigation, physicians have always despised malpractice suits. Even those who consider litigation appropriate in cases of serious injury to a patient still think of the system as fundamentally flawed and corrupt. But modifying ...

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This doctor wants the funds diverted to more common problems, like cancer:

A senior medical health officer from B.C. has issued a warning that too much money and resources are being poured into pandemic planning, when the real threat is low.

Speaking at a disaster forum in Banff, Dr. John Blatherwick said the $400 million set aside in last week's federal budget for pandemic planning would be better spent ...

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He laments:

People, malpractice is one percent of the dollars, and it's about 17th on the list of major health care problems and issues we face in this country! It's the abortion issue of health care - polarizing way way beyond it's importance.
Deal with it. With 40 percent of malpractice cases being baseless, there is certainly reason for the obsession with malpractice. When physicians let ...

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This one has potential, unlike Pfizer's inhaled-insulin dog Exubera:

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration said on Thursday it approved Pfizer's Chantix tablet to help cigarette smokers stop smoking.

The active ingredient in Chantix, varenicline tartrate, acts at sites in the brain affected by nicotine, the FDA said.

The drug may help smokers trying to kick the habit by providing some nicotine effects to ease the withdrawal symptoms, ...

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Just how many do we need?

For a host of reasons, at least half of patients fail to comply with the treatments their doctors prescribe. Dr. Edward C. Rosenow III of the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine calls compliance "the sixth vital sign," as important as respiration, heart rate, temperature, blood pressure and pain in evaluating a patient's medical status.

Some of "coma effects" probably doesn't film well:

Not showing typical coma-related effects such as muscle wasting, bed sores and incontinence may be a conscious decision on the part of filmmakers to "maximize entertainment but is a disservice to the viewer," they write in the journal Neurology.

Both sides of the tort reform debate are using this study as ammunition:

About 40 percent of the medical malpractice cases filed in the United States are groundless, according to a Harvard analysis of the hotly debated issue that pits trial lawyers against doctors, with lawmakers in the middle.

Many of the lawsuits analyzed contained no evidence that a medical error was committed or that the patient ...

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