David Catron, the human BS detector, weighs in...

Then someone forgot to tell this Canadian physician...

I soon discovered that the problems went well beyond overcrowded ERs. Patients had to wait for practically any diagnostic test or procedure, such as the man with persistent pain from a hernia operation whom we referred to a pain clinic - with a three-year wait list; or the woman with breast cancer who needed to wait four months for radiation ...

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Congratulations to Paul Levy, the only Hospital CEO with the courage to engage the blogosphere. Here's to another great year!

Update: It seems that I was mistaken, I'll be adding More Than Medicine & hospital impact to my google reader's list of blogs. Thanks Tony.

Someone is posting deposition videos on YouTube in an attempt to sway potential jurors in the John A. King malpractice case.

Medicine today

This sounds just about right. The reader has fee-for-service reimbursement and malpractice to thank:

The operating doctor could not visit me in the hospital or in rehab, which was a lice-infested nursing home. He did nothing.

My internist forgot to make arrangements for my stress test. He also did not visit me in the hospital. Both these doctors sent their associates to see me, and the associates don't ...

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Spare-part babies

A growing trend:

At the moment parents are usually only allowed to create such babies, also known as "saviour siblings" to save the life of another child.

But a joint committee of MPs and Lords is expected to argue that the technique should help conditions that are not immediately life-threatening such as sickle-cell anaemia.

Robert Centor talks about his July attending month. Sadly, his style is in the minority.

Holy cow. A case report not for the faint of heart. (via Scalpel)

TBTAM says the media ignores what's good about it.

I've said from the beginning that BiDil is essentially two generics combined into an expensive brand name drug. Well the sales are showing that this approach isn't working:

As the WSJ reported earlier this year, groups including the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology say there's no evidence that prescribing BiDil works any better than prescribing both of its constituent generics, isosorbide dinitrate and ...

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The pharma maverick's media empire is growing.

Someone posts a suicide note on the controversial website. Watch what happens next.

Cyberchondrics

A fast-growing segment of the web population:

The number of so-called cyberchondriacs seeking health information on the Web has soared to about 160 million in 2006 -- a 37 percent rise over two years, according a new poll.

"Cyberchondriacs now represent 84 percent of all online adults, up from last year's 80 percent, and 72 percent in 2005," Harris Interactive, the market research firm that conducted the survey, ...

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Jacob Reider thinks many doctors don't have the time.

Dr. RW summarizes some discussion on UpToDate and their Microsoft-like approach to medical information dominance.

He offers a free-market based solution:

Mr. Giuliani said that a "socialist" model would bankrupt the government.

"That is where Hillary Clinton, Barack Obama and John Edwards are taking you," he said. "You have got to see the trap. Otherwise we are in for a disaster. We are in for Canadian health care, French health care, British health care." . . .

. . . In proposing ...

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Generally people who think doctor's are paid too much aren't really grounded in reality:

How do academic and think tank critics, generally far removed from the clinical frontlines, know what's a fair income for American doctors? They seldom provide details or a thoughtful analysis based on life in America. Do they factor in the cost of living and housing is much greater in the U.S, the relentless 3% annual ...

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Why Panda Bear won't go into surgery:

It's part of their culture to treat each other disrespectfully during training. Whether this is necessary to train a surgeon cannot be known. It's just the way the system has evolved and it seems to be structured to keep residents perpetually tired and irritated at everyone and everything.

A study looks at whether religious physicians provide more charity care:

Physicians who described themselves as religious were only slightly more likely to have done charity care compared to all those surveyed (31 vs. 25%). What is even more surprising is that physicians who described themselves as atheist or agnostic were slightly more likely to have done charity care than those who described themselves as religious (35 vs. 31%).

A lot of the reasons seem to deal with narcotics.

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