Despite the evidence, why do people continue to ask for PSA screening? "One factor in the popularity of PSA testing is that it is backed by powerful commercial forces which assiduously promote its benefits. One prominent campaigning group, Us Too! International - which is based in the USA with branches in other countries, including several in the UK - describes itself as a 'grassroots' organisation set up by prostate cancer ...

Read more...

Different drugs having the same name. Dilacor is diltiazem in the USA, but digoxin in Serbia.

A doctor bans PlayStation to stop head-twitching in a boy. "All the head jerking is gone and his eyes are completely back to normal."

Clinical Cases and Images talks about how Google and Wikipedia is going to change medicine:

Google often beats UpToDate in finding what you are looking for. UpToDate information is far more reliable but Google is much broader.

Just see who brings visitors to BMJ website, Google leads it closest competitor by a multiple of nine (450,000 as compared to 50,000). Many young people believe that "if something ...

Read more...

A prominent oncologist admits to falsifying data in a Lancet study. "Sudbo, 44, invented patients and case histories for a study of oral cancer that was published in the British medical journal the Lancet in October 2005, she said.

The Norwegian daily Dagbladet said that 250 of his sample of 908 people in the study all shared the same birthday."

NY Times on China's health care woes:

When Jin Guilian's family took him to a county hospital in this gritty industrial city after a jarring two-day bus ride during which he drifted in and out of consciousness, the doctors took one look at him and said: "How dare you do this to him? This man could die at any moment."

Jin Guilian lays in his hospital bed in ...

Read more...

Americans seem to worry about the wrong diseases:

A disease like diabetes gallops practically out of control, with estimates that 21 million Americans have it and 45 million more could develop it. Yet relatively few people worry about it or alter their behavior to postpone or possibly prevent its onset.

On the other hand, just the mention of flesh-eating disease, a staph infection that affects maybe 1,500 Americans each ...

Read more...

Gays are at a disadvantage in malpractice cases. Does this affect medical care? Some think so:

According to Langen, the hospital said Spicehandler died of an embolism. But he said no one was attending Spicehandler at the time of his death, and Langen questioned the care he received.

But unlike a married heterosexual spouse, Langen may not be able to sue for medical malpractice in New York State.

Read more...

Drugs for sex. This is the wrong type of reimbursement.

Analysis of the medical coverage of Sharon's stroke. "This medical mud-slinging has drawn a lot of criticism against the irresponsible press for dealing in things in which they have no expertise - and against doctors rushing to pass judgment without knowing the exact facts.

Such criticism is totally detached from reality. The prime minister had a right to privacy, like any other citizen, but he gave that right ...

Read more...

Some are suggesting that Sharon's diagnosis of cerebral amyloid angiopathy was being suppressed because of political reasons:

The doctor said there was the fear that if made public, the information would be used against Sharon and his Kadima party, particularly in light of the fact that CAA has often been associated in medical literature with Alzheimer's Disease.

Dark days at UC-Irvine. First the liver transplant program. Now the bone marrow transplant program is in trouble.

DB gives primary care some respect. "We could solve this problem if we aligned the incentives towards primary care, rather than away from primary care. Primary care physicians are underpaid - relative to their colleagues - and have to work very hard, long hours. They get little respect within the medical community - and yet they deserve the utmost respect because (in my opinion) they truly have the most ...

Read more...

"Quite frankly, my eggs are rotting." Says an oncologist while trying to seduce "The Bachelor".

Newer, and more expensive, is not always better. Apparently, the liquid-based PAP test (done at almost every GYN office) is no better than the old one:

"Liquid-based cytology did not reduce the percentage of unsatisfactory slides compared with conventional cytology," they concluded. "There are very few studies with which to estimate the relative performance of the two methods validly, and there is no evidence that liquid-based cytology is more ...

Read more...

Staffing issues in the UK are delaying radiation treatment for cancer. This is leading to a decrease in cancer survival rates:

"Radiotherapy services in the UK are inferior to those in most developed countries and indeed many poorer countries," he said quoting earlier research.

He told the BBC News website: "Unfortunately the here and now of this is in terms of radiotherapy capacity in the UK in many ...

Read more...

Tired of the new Medicare drug plan? Just throw up your hands and give away meds:

Unable to determine whether their patients are on the new Medicare drug plan, many U.S. pharmacists say they now give away drugs to some seniors on blind faith, simply hoping they will be reimbursed at a later date.

Massachusetts gets a D-minus for its medical liability environment. "'If ACEP gives Massachusetts a D-minus that is a reflection of the failing grade the insurance companies deserve for price gouging their own physicians,' said malpractice lawyer Marc Breakstone."

Of course.

Another malpractice case where a C-section was done too early. "The lawsuit alleges Gulick developed lung disease because doctors performed a Cesarean section delivery too early.

Doctors then administered anesthesia to the infant in preparation for surgery to repair an unrelated abdominal defect. The anesthesia exacerbated the child's breathing difficulties, and ultimately led to his death, according to the lawsuit.

The plaintiffs claim recommended tests to check ...

Read more...

I don't think a single-payor system is the answer. Yes, profiteers are taking advantage of the lack of access in Canada. And we're not even talking about concierge care:

Clients willing to shell out a $1,200 enrolment fee and yearly dues of $2,300 can become members of three for-profit medical clinics to open in those three cities this summer by Vancouver-based Copeman Healthcare Inc.

And founder Don Copeman ...

Read more...