Listening to them may not be the best idea:

When investigators called 46 such healthlines and described a standardized scripted stroke scenario, 10 operators (22%) recommended that the caller contact their primary care physician, instead of calling 9-1-1, according to a study reported in the July 5 issue of Stroke.

A recent article claimed that some PCP's had patient panels exceeding 3700. David Williams doesn't believe it:

I think these numbers are an exaggeration, especially the first. Most primary care physicians have 1500 to 2500 patients and somehow seem to survive. To have even 3750, never mind 5000 would require never seeing most of them or making heavy use of nurse practitioners and other "physician extenders."

If ...

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It was a close call.

Fellow passengers are suing for various amounts, based on where they were sitting:

"We think that Mr. Speaker has committed a fault, and put people into inconvenience and suffering, and therefore there should be some compensation," he said.

In a notice of the lawsuit sent to Speaker three weeks ago, damages were listed at $100,000 for each of the sisters and at $60,000 for the Laval man, who was ...

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A letter arguing that making VistA free was a terrible decision:

It seems as if everyone's objective is to deceive physicians into thinking a "free" electronic health record is available. As I've mentioned before, the introduction of WorldVistA was a terrible decision that is only confusing the market. A lot of people are wasting their time and efforts on a system that is as antiquated as the first PC.

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Can a rise in malpractice rates adversely affect patient safety?

"The way medicine is structured, your income really depends on how many operations you do," said Dr. Roger Hardl, a neurosurgeon at New York Presbyterian Hospital. "That means that you are put into a position where you have to operate more. I'm not sure that's in the best interests of the public. I'm not sure that's in the best ...

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And that's pretty much it:

Although government-dominated systems may not improve care, they will relieve anxiety about access, ease financial pressure, and assuage societal guilt. When something is "free, " it diminishes the angst (and increases the demand). The trouble with government is that it's too far removed from the clinical marketplace to make intelligent even relevant decisions, doesn't realize the consequences of its actions, e.g. paying primary care ...

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Joe Paduda writes EMTALA and cost-shifting:

Opinion time. EMTALA is a hidden tax, requiring hospitals to treat patients without hope of reimbursement. The cost of treatment is then shifted to other, paying patients, further driving up their health care costs.

And as more and more folks lose their insurance, those left with insurance cards in their wallets will find the increasing number of their 'dependents' is growing beyond their ...

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Edwin Leap on why physicians care about suicidal patients:

As for me, I'll keep pushing the charcoal and talking to the counselors and sewing the wounds. And God help me, I'll try not to act angry or annoyed. Because if my child ever reaches that place, and I can't be there to fight for them, I want someone to ask, not'Why do we do it?', but rather,'Why ...

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Electrophysiologist Dr. Wes on the NY Times' articles on afib and its treatments:

To think that doctors are not keenly aware of the risks involved with this procedure is ludicrous - we spend far too many (unreimbursed) hours in the lab to think otherwise. Believe me, none of us are proud of the 25-30% recurrence rate seen with this procedure, none of us enjoys the long procedure lengths nor ...

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The NY Times summarizes what's lacking with Michael Moore's single-payer solution.

An audacious take on health care reform. Fox News interviews National Review's Jerry Bowyer: "I think the terrorists have shown over and over again"¦they're very good at gaming the system with bureaucracies."

It is more than the insurance industry that reformers will have to overcome:

So, to do as Moore wants in the United States, you would need to do more than just overcome the insurance industry. You would need to cut the salaries of doctors, reform the legal system, enrage our allies by causing their prescription drug costs to escalate, and accustom patients to a central decision-maker authorized to determine what ...

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The well-known symptoms of diarrhea is forcing users to stick to a low-fat diet:

The gross side effects might scare away the less-committed, but some experts appreciate Alli's very real, very immediate consequences of cheating on your diet.

"It forces you to eat a lower-fat diet "” if you don't, you're violently penalized for not doing so," says David Sarwer, the director of clinical services at the Center ...

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Classic headline from an op-ed wondering about whether last week's events will impact screening foreign physicians:

Terrorist doctors might now just be the in thing for jihadis. Canada, like Britain has a doctor shortage where the solution is to bring in foreign doctors. Andy Knight, a University of Alberta specialist in industrial relations said that our screening of foreign doctors is not sufficient. But the reality is that no ...

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. . . or pain in the ass? There is a fine line.

Health courts

Pros and cons.

Bilal Abdulla

Portrait of the physician-terrorist.

A nurse feels that the EMTALA allows ER's to turn away non-emergent cases. Why don't they do it more often then?

What is interesting is that the act also states: "If the patient does not have an "emergency medical condition", the statute imposes no further obligation on the hospital".
So the question becomes why do we treat all of these people, 90% of whom do not have an "emergent ...

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A patient asks a chiropractor about her abdominal pain during her treatment. His answer gets him in trouble.

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