Fed up

More are becoming fed up with rushed, harried doctors, and turning to holistic care:

Walking around Victoria, I saw signs of this new two-tier health care everywhere I went: yoga studios on every corner, organic cafes, Ayurvedic health centres where people are encouraged to try healing the herbal, holistic way. Maybe it sounds flaky, but you can't argue with results.

And Rush Limbaugh got caught.

There's a good discussion going on at DB's discussing how lawyers and physicians define what acceptable evidence is:

We who favor special health courts believe that this story provides a classic example of poor definitions of evidence. We expect the same definition of evidence for our medical practice and any judgment of malpractice. Having a son in law school, I understand (because he has explained this clearly) that the ...

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Medblogger interview

Clinical Cases and Images is interviewed by a medical librarian.

MRSA

A women is infected with MRSA after getting her eyebrows waxed.

Orlistat

GSK is hoping OTC Xenical (Orlistat) will be a blockbuster. Don't expect miracles however. From UptoDate, here is the results of a meta-analysis of the prescription version:

Almost two-thirds of the subjects completed the first year of treatment. Weight loss at one year varied from 5.5 to 6.6 percent of initial body weight in the placebo groups and 8.5 to 10.2 percent in the orlistat groups.

Mumps

The recent epidemic has left the efficacy of the vaccine in question:

Even among those given both shots, 10 percent are left unprotected against mumps. The failure rate for measles and rubella is only 1 percent. For those who skip the second shot, 20 percent have no mumps protection, with 6 percent to 8 percent remaining vulnerable to measles and rubella.

Celebrex ads

With patents for Lipitor and Norvasc expiring soon, Pfizer is revving up the Celebrex ad machine:

The ads for the Pfizer painkiller Celebrex feature a man holding a boy's hand as they walk up a stadium staircase. "52 steps won't keep you from taking him out to the ballgame," they say.

But a heart attack would.

Each ad includes a boldface warning that begins, "Important Information: Celebrex ...

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The BBC investigates the link between autism and sleep disorders:

Although Jacqui's family's situation is so severe, studies have shown that of the 500,000 people on the autistic spectrum in the UK most have some sort of sleep problems.

Over a third of them suffer from serious sleep problems that are debilitating for their families, partners and careers.

How to apologize after medical error, and when not to:

An FP in Washington State learned this the hard way when he failed to notice, until a follow-up visit, that a patient's PSA was elevated. "I referred him to a urologist, who successfully treated him for prostate cancer," says the FP, who requested anonymity. "The delay in diagnosis had no negative effect, but I told the patient because I felt ...

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How HIPAA is impeding physician-patient email interactions:

As most medicos know, legalities are only as binding as a judge sees fit... especially with the long shadow cast over the health business by the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA).

Not only has the Act made it really hard to stay out of a courtroom, but health pros are having more and more trouble keeping up with HIPAA's requirements.
(via ...

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GruntDoc is not dead

He is simply a victim of the DOS attack on Hosting Matters. I was affected for a brief time this morning as well - but at least my blog survived (so far). GruntDoc will return soon.

Update:
He's back up.

Dr. Crippen probably won't be happy about this:

Nurse practitioners are gaining broader acceptance by health insurers and medical regulators. In Iowa, Oregon and a dozen other states, nurse practitioners can operate without doctors' collaboration or supervision. Most states allow the nurses to prescribe the vast majority of drugs, with the exception of controlled substances such as narcotics.

Medicare, the U.S. insurance program for the elderly ...

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During my time off, I read Malcolm Gladwell's fascinating Blink. One chapter deals with Chicago's Cook County Hospital, and it's adherence to Goldman's algorithm for diagnosing chest pain. Gladwell writes:

One of the stories I tell in "Blink" is about the Emergency Room doctors at Cook County Hospital in Chicago. That's the big public hospital in Chicago, and a few years ago they changed the ...

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Is this standard of care for a sprained ankle?

James Greco claims Vest failed to provide anticoagulant therapy to his wife on April 30, 2004, failed to warn her of the risk she had for the development of deep vein thrombosis, and failed to consult with a specialist in vascular surgery or disease and/or radiologic expertise to evaluate and treat Tamara.

A podiatrist is sentenced to death.

Orac is skeptical that a medical Wikipedia would work.

The worth of a cure for cancer? $50 trillion.

Much appreciation goes out to Clinical Cases and Images and This Makes Me Sick for keeping the blog fresh in my absence.

Selling sickness: the pharmaceutical industry and disease mongering, BMJ:

"There's a lot of money to be made from telling healthy people they're sick.

Some forms of medicalising ordinary life may now be better described as disease mongering: widening the boundaries of treatable illness in order to expand markets for those who sell and deliver treatments."