She made up the allegations about sexual misconduct:

A woman who accused her doctor of molesting her and having his identical twin impersonate him to assault her must pay the doctor $2.8 million because she fabricated the allegations, a judge ruled . . .

. . . "The contradictions and inconsistencies in Ms. Saldivar's testimony were some of the most pronounced this court has ever seen," Stolz wrote Wednesday.
The ...

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The so-called "sleeper effect" in kids:

Children who light up just once are twice as likely to become steady smokers later.

British researchers report that, among 11-year-olds, the desire to smoke can lie dormant for more than three years after trying just one cigarette.

The researchers call this a "sleeper effect," and it doubles the risk that a child who smokes just one cigarette will become a regular ...

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Most will learn this important public health information from the drug company:

The scientists and researchers who made and tested these incredibly promising vaccines will probably not be deciding the best way to educate men and women about cervical cancer, or how to plan for affordable global distribution that is now, more than ever, the right thing to do.

Regrettably, some of those decisions have already been made ...

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Striking numbers. Also, the top 5 percent of the population accounted for 49 percent of health care expenditures.

Indications for use are expanding daily:

Overactive bladder, diabetic nerve pain, excessive sweating, migraine headaches, voice tremors — these are just a few of the conditions that the drug Botox can treat. This week came the news that yet another condition might be alleviated by Botox — benign prostatic hypertrophy, or prostate enlargement.

The patient was denied a promotion once his boss found out:

A man who tested positive for HIV is suing his Charlotte doctor, saying he was denied a promotion at work after the doctor faxed confidential medical records to his office.

The man says his boss found the report, and he experienced discrimination at work.

The latest, hilarious, slice of Dr. Charles' life.

She cites considerable family stress.

No surprise with the increased gadgetry in surgery:

Surgeons who warmed up by playing video games like "Super Monkey Ball" for 20 minutes immediately prior to performing surgical drills were faster and made fewer errors than those who did not, said Dr. James "Butch" Rosser, lead investigator on the study, slated for release Wednesday.

The research involved 303 surgeons participating in a medical training course that included video ...

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Great idea, but there's no way to enforce this:

West Virginia families served by Medicaid could face a reduction in benefits if they refuse to sign contracts promising to show up for doctors' appointments and to use the emergency room only for emergencies.

Well, that's what happens when profits takes precidence:

Tardiness or refusal to pay what doctors consider legitimate medical claims may add as much as 15 to 20 percent in overhead costs for physicians, forcing them to pursue those claims or pass along the costs to other patients.



It has been shown to help with Alzheimer's disease:

Named the world's most soothing robot by Guinness World Records, the robot can express emotions and react sensitively to humans by cooing, moving delicately and opening and closing its eyes. It looks happy when patted on the head and gets angry when ignored. Paro has been shown to help people suffering from Alzheimer's disease and mental disorders by reducing ...

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I was reading this piece in the Boston Globe about a new malpractice proposal. Of course, Studdert's malpractice findings are trotted out:

A study released by the Harvard School of Public Health earlier this month found that about 40 percent of the medical malpractice cases filed in the United States are groundless. Many of the lawsuits analyzed contained no evidence that a medical error was committed or that the ...

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. . . to almost 30 percent of practicing physicians. Want to boost membership? How about reducing the ridiculously high annual fee, or making AMNews free again. You're welcome - no charge for that advice.

People in jail often get better health care than those on the outside:

"These people may have neglected their own health on the outside, but once they get in here they develop all kinds of ailments," Hertz said. "The ailments may just be outlandish, but we can't afford to tell them they're crazy. We have to err on the side of caution because if they really are sick, and we ...

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He does heart surgery on gorillas during his spare time:

Frist, at heart, is a doctor. At 5:45 a.m., before a recent Senate workday, he prepared for a quirky slice of surgery. During congressional breaks, Frist, 54, has been known to fly to Africa to operate. But in Washington, he has quietly cultivated another practice: gorillas at the National Zoo.

"These gorillas seem to develop heart disease," said ...

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This editorial essentially sides with the physicians regarding their letter against homeopathy in the UK, but says they're too mean:

Where the 13 medical scientists went wrong yesterday was in their tone. The NHS is supposed to be seeking to become patient-centred, under which there is "shared decision-taking". Medicine aims to become a team effort. And scientists are in urgent need of more public support. All this will only ...

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I'd be curious in hearing an OB's opinion on this case:

A jury in New Brunswick has awarded a North Brunswick couple $14 million to help them with the long-term care of their 5-year-old son, who was born with a genetic birth defect that will require him to have blood transfusions the rest of his life.

The jury deliberated less than two hours on Friday after hearing evidence ...

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A 17-year old dies after a tonsillectomy:

Irene Triplett's lawyer, Bruce Fagel, said that Lee ordered the nurses to give Versed, a sedative, to calm Gomez before surgery. At the post-anesthesia care unit, Gomez was given two injections of two milligrams of morphine. The injections were 10 minutes apart, Fagel said. The morphine was given because a nurse thought Gomez was in pain because he was "moaning." Those drugs caused ...

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Similar in concept to an airplane's black box, can this be coming soon?

Doctors attending a medical conference in Tobago have been told of a new device, called a "medical black box," capable helping doctors improve their surgical skills and of detecting malpractices in operating theatres.

"The black box or clinical data recorder will allow data to be recorded and lead to improvements in patient care." said Pro. ...

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