The story of a stripper turned psychologist. "Lucy Wightman ran a successful South Shore psychology practice until her past became public. Now, after her indictment, the woman who was once Boston's best-known stripper is defending her second life as a therapist - and trying to salvage her dignity."

Medicine is a business, and physicians have to learn to deal with it:

As vice president of my wife's medical practice, I must defend practice management consultant David Scroggins. His assessment of physician productivity in "Secret weapons for a successful practice" [Oct. 7, 2005] is correct. If we don't meet our financial goals and pay our fiscal obligations, we shut our doors.

The business of medicine requires planning, discipline, ...

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Tired of waiting rooms? You can do what this guy did and drive your SUV through it:

The impatient patient was admitted to the hospital with minor injuries after smashing his Suburban into the waiting room, and was listed in good condition Friday afternoon, hospital spokeswoman Sheryl Sullivan told the paper.

Sullivan said no staff or patients were injured during the hospital's conversion to a drive-through.


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Some play the lottery to win millions. Others play to receive primary care:

The Ocean View Family Practice is scheduled to open in March with three family doctors and one mentoring physician. It won't be a walk-in clinic; patients will have to win a random draw.

"This is an attempt to experiment to see if we can solve a very long-standing problem in our district that's growing progressively ...

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A physician talks about being on the front lines in Iraq:

She arrived in Iraq in January 2004 to find a one-room command station that looked like it had been shelled, and a team of fresh-faced medics just out of training instead of the seasoned long-timers she expected.

"Some of them barely knew how to start an IV," Sweeney said. "So we spent afternoons training. . . . Everybody ...

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A surgeon's call-up to active Army duty leads to a lawsuit with his civilian employer.

Smokers are suing Philip Morris for yearly spiral chest CT scans. "A group of longtime Marlboro cigarette smokers sued Philip Morris USA on Thursday, asking the tobacco giant to pay for annual high-tech screenings they say would catch lung cancer in its early stages.

Like other tobacco lawsuits, the complaint filed by four plaintiffs in federal court alleges they were victims of deceptive marketing of a deadly product. ...

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Grand Rounds submissions

Arrangements have been made to make this potentially the most widely-read Grand Rounds ever. That's all I'll say.

Please email me your entries by Monday, January 23rd, 6pm EST.

Submission guidelines can be found here.

"You'll have to sue to find out." A woman becomes a quadruple amputee after giving birth:

"I want to know what happened. I went to deliver my baby and I came out like this," Mejia said.

Mejia said after she gave birth to Mathew last spring, she was kept in the hospital with complications. Twelve days after giving birth at Orlando Regional South Seminole hospital, she was transported ...

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Slate on Medicare Part D - "It's too damn complicated." Furthermore:

The failure of Bush's reform effort illustrates an important point about psychology and economics"”what writer Barry Schwartz* calls the "paradox of choice." Given too many options, rational actors are more likely to be paralyzed than to pick wisely. To take another example, consumers now have the right to choose from a long list of electricity suppliers via their ...

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A key hospital priority - brand awareness:

Merahn has only been on the job for a few months at Einstein, so his branding strategy is still evolving. He has spent much of his time interviewing people at Einstein to learn more about that network, and how and what to promote. The pediatrician-turned-administrator believes branding is a key component in any communications strategy -- regardless of whether you're selling cars, cell ...

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DB looks at why patients stop taking their statins. "Whether the statins were causing problems in these two otherwise health (sic) men is unclear. What is clear is that they believed that statins caused a decreased quality of life. They clearly put blame on the statin for feeling less well. Despite being very intelligent, and understanding that their cholesterol levels were greatly improved, they decided to stop the statins."

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The veil of secrecy is coming down at fertility clinics. "Largely unregulated, fertility clinics have long operated under the assumption that preserving anonymity is best for all parties. But as the stigma of infertility fades, the secrecy of the process is coming under attack, both from parents like Ms. Villalba and from the growing number of adults who owe their lives to donors."

It helps to be rich if you need an organ:

To find matching donor organs, transplant centers rely on the United Network for Organ Sharing, or UNOS, a nonprofit organization that maintains a nationwide patient waiting list. Organs are then typically dispensed to the sickest patients or to those who have been waiting a long time.

UNOS maintains the list, but it's left up to 256 organ transplant ...

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The "July effect" of new residents takes place in January in Australia. "It's an oft-quoted fact that 'complications' increase in January, aided by the influx of nervous junior doctors who have yet to find out just how their new hospital works and where everything is. We've been through medical school and passed our exams, we've been floating around various hospitals for the past few years of our lives; but ...

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How an iPod can improve stethoscope skills. "The iPod or other listening device can help train doctors to use their stethoscope more and be more efficient, according to TIME. Dr. Michael Barrett of Temple University in Philadelphia, in a study published today in the American Journal of Medicine, concluded that medical students improved their stethoscope skills dramatically if they listened to certain digitally recorded soundtracks that mimic the distinctive vibrations ...

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On the Supreme Court's ruling of Oregon's Death with Dignity Act. "Any effective physician has two fundamental roles. The first is to prolong life. The second is to ease suffering. In most situations, easing suffering is part of prolonging life, as when we guide a patient through an accident or a surgery and treat pain as part of ensuring survival. Sometimes, though, our two roles collide, and a decision ...

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Australia is considering having nurses perform some physician duties. The Australian Medical Association reacts:

AMA national vice-president Choong-Siew Yong said proposals to replace doctors with "lesser-trained and lower-skilled" health workers was unacceptable.

"A doctor is a doctor is a doctor," Dr Yong said.

"Australians in the city and in the country in all states and territories want quick and affordable access to a doctor – not a ...

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Merck is striking back against the NEJM. "A current editor and former editor of the New England Journal of Medicine, which last month criticized drug maker Merck & Co. for withholding data from a published study on its withdrawn painkiller Vioxx, will be grilled next week by the company's lawyers.

The depositions, ahead of the next round of product liability trials over Merck's former blockbuster arthritis pill, will ...

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The world's first face transplant recipient is using her new lips to take up smoking again. ". . . [which] doctors fear could interfere with her healing and raise the risk of tissue rejection."