Demand increases, shortages develop, quality goes down. The road where Medicare is taking us.

Thanks to various commenters from the prior post for the links.

Apparently the patient didn't want any student touching her. More details:

Mullins sued because several weeks before the procedure, her surgeon, Dr. Marvin E. Eastlund provided her with an informed consent document on which she indicated she did not want health care students in the operating room.

"Whose responsibility is it when a patient ...

Read more...

Medical care in Belgium

Certainly a world of difference compared to what happens here:

This was the beginning of a series of happy discoveries about medical care in Belgium. Healthcare in the US is mired in bureaucracy and competing interests and concerns about liability. It's a complex system that both doctors and patients hate for different reasons. The typical doctor must employ a receptionist to handle calls and appointments, an office manager to handle ...

Read more...

Chiropractic quackery

So much for time travel being a valid therapy:

State regulators had been investigating Dr. James Burda of Athens, who said he could take care of anyone, anywhere by reaching back in time to when the injury occurred.

Burda said he discovered the skill six years ago when he hurt his own foot while driving. He said he gave the pain a command to stop and it went away.

Read more...

Lawyers sidestep a voter-approved constitutional malpractice cap. Doctors are asking patients to sign a form waiving their rights to to collect anything more than $250,000 in a medical malpractice lawsuit:

"We cannot allow trial lawyers to circumvent the will of the people through their legal maneuvering," said Patrick Hutton, president of the Florida Medical Association and an orthopedic surgeon from the Jacksonville area.

Hutton and other FMA officials ...

Read more...

Some patients think they can sue doctors for anything. Like this story over medical bills:

Out of the blue, we received a bill for $300 from a collection agency from the former neurologist. I recently wrote to the doctor and told her what had transpired and how we felt we owe her nothing.

We know we could have pursued a medical malpractice claim but choose not to, ...

Read more...

Having medical students intubate during elective procedures, under supervision of an anesthesiologist, is common practice. However, this patient specifically wanted no medical students, but the hospital ignored her wishes:

The Indiana Supreme Court is considering whether a woman who had to have a second surgery after a medical student tore her esophagus during a botched procedure was a victim of battery.
Attorneys for W- Ruth Mullins say she signed ...

Read more...

I don't think almost-bankrupt General Motors is really in a place where they should be telling anybody how to run things.

I'm surprised it took this long.

More challenges facing primary care. Why do I get the feeling this is just protesting on the Titanic?

Sorry, this is not news at all - as readers here already know.

I'm happy to see the hospitals developing a backbone. Someone has to fight against reimbursement extortion that the insurance monopolies are applying. Notably, UnitedHealth is involved in many of these disputes.

It is Actiq, which is transmucosal fentanyl. Apparently this expensive drug is routinely being prescribed for musculoskeletal conditions.

Truths in the ER

Scalpel or Sword (newly added to the blogroll) lists a few. (via GruntDoc)

Any anesthesiologists out there care to speculate on what could of happened?

Travis has said the dental staff gave Diamond a liquid sedative, followed by nitrous oxide and intravenous sedation. Travis said she entered the office after the procedure and saw her daughter lying motionless on her side in a dentist chair.

The girl's head was rolled back, her eyes were in the back of her head and ...

Read more...

Another example showing the ridiculousness of the Medicare RVU system:

And even worse, the insurance companies use the Medicare RVUs to set their rates, so everyone is socialized. If the government told all restaurants that they could only charge $10 for a steak dinner, whether they were Golden Corral or Smith and Wollensky's, what do you think would happen to the quality of the dining experience? Is that really ...

Read more...

Only 74 percent are passing recertification their first try.

This includes two primary care and five specialists. This sort of fragmented age presents another barrier for P4P, and is reflective of the bloat plaguing American health care.

It never works to save money. This will lead to an increase in the volume of procedures, further driving up health care costs:

When physician fees are capped, the number and complexity (or volume and intensity) of services furnished to Medicare beneficiaries simply increase, including more frequent and intensive office visits, and a rapid increase in the use of imaging techniques, laboratory services, and physician-administered drugs, which will lead ...

Read more...

Of course, liability is the reason. Patients lose again:

Florida Hospital and Orlando Regional officials agree liability is a factor, though they emphasize safety as their main concern. But Bair at Central Florida Regional said that hospital's policy was prompted by worries that a photo or videotape could end up as evidence in a trial.

A birth video last year helped lead to a malpractice settlement in Missouri, ...

Read more...