As people continue to digest the data from the study, more are coming to the same conclusion:

The comment came after a recent study from Harvard found that four out of every 10 medical malpractice cases were groundless. The researchers reported that many of the lawsuits they analyzed had no evidence that a medical error was committed or even that the patient had suffered any injury.

However, Dr. David ...

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More tales from the single-payer system up north:

Seven Oaks came within a whisker of shutting down its ER last week because it couldn't find an ER doctor to fill a shift.

They found a family physician to fill in at the last minute, but still had to divert ambulances to other ERs for more serious cases.

And now this. Another resignation.

The scary part is this ...

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AMA membership for 1/2 price . . . for a 1/2 year membership. Brilliant.

It's mainly because of too much politicking:

What's so bad about this sort of thing? After all, Who's Who and its progeny operate a similar scam. I would argue, though, that by adopting the guidebook approach, Best Doctors (or Best Lawyers or Best Dentists) fails the public by making a false promise. The real problem at hand - how do you find a reliable professional whose services you very ...

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Mandatory pre-trial arbitration and loser pays. Cases would be resolved sooner, which would appropriately compensate patients injured by true medical malpractice more quickly.

A one-cent a can tax would generate huge revenue:

The committee did not specify how high the tax should be. But a consumer group, Center for Science in the Public Interest, estimates that a 1 cent a can tax would raise $1.5 billion a year. That's more than the advertising budget of McDonald's.

One of the great villains of medical history, who has done significant damage to public health with his false MMR-autism claims:

The editor admitted he would not have published the 1998 paper if he had known about what he called a "fatal conflict of interest".

Mr Wakefield was being paid to see if there was any evidence to support possible legal action by a group of parents who ...

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Cost is a big one:

Gardasil offers nearly 100% protection against the two most common cancer-causing HPV strains, as well as two others that cause genital warts. But at $360 for three shots given over six months, the vaccine, which was developed by Merck, is among the most expensive on the market. The price tag alone probably puts it out of reach for many uninsured women in the U.S. (as ...

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Roy Poses feels that physicians should reclaim healthcare management:

This commentary makes very clear what sort of thinking pervades the current leadership of health care. Health care is a business, like any other, without any particular values or ideals that set it apart from manufacturing automobiles, or hauling trash.

This thinking has been going on at least since the 1980's, when Einthoven, one of the leaders of the ...

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This letter explains why, referring to the recent Studdert study detailing a broken malpractice system:

The AP reporter got it right the first time. The report found that 3 percent of the claims had absolutely no adverse outcome for the patient at all. Thirty-seven percent had an adverse outcome but there was no negligence or malpractice involved.

The paper says, on page 2029, "We found that only a small ...

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The physician followed standard of care in this unfortunate, rare case. However, the family felt the need to blame someone, so a lawsuit was brought. Sometimes, unfortunate outcomes happen - and it's no one's fault:

He said Humphrey treated Kim appropriately given a history of fibroids, that bleeding can still occur when women are on Depo-Provera and that performing a hysterectomy in the face of a benign ...

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They're responding by considering going on strike:

Like most junior doctors, he worked 12 days without a break, including 16-hour shifts. The shortest day was a busy 10 hours ending at 6pm -– scarcely enough time to get home to read his two children a bedtime story. Somehow, he also found time to study for and pass a tough exam.

"I was super-stressed out."

The death of one ...

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This specialist illustrates the sad state:

"Our government is letting the misbehavior of a relatively small number of people too often trump the needs of many, many good people with complex medical problems and lots of pain," he said recently, seating behind his office desk where a chart of pain levels is prominently displayed. (1-2 is mild pain, 5-6 is distressing pain, 9-10 is excruciating pain.) "Many doctors won'Â’t prescribe ...

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The LA Times looks closer at in-flight medical emergencies.

He's doing all of this just to get more Lunesta for his patient? Ridiculous:

When Tufts Health Plan cut a patient's prescription for the sleep aid Lunesta from 30 pills to 10 pills a month, her physician, Dr. Stephen A. Hoffmann, decided to circumvent state regulations by writing a second prescription in the name of her husband so she could get 10 more pills per month.

Hoffmann ...

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The idea is to embed students with patients:

To create more caring doctors, the trainee medics from Melbourne University will shadow patients as they sit in GP waiting rooms, visited specialists and recuperated at home.

Under the scheme, which mirrors a pilot program at Harvard Medical School in the US, partnering a patient with a chronic illness such as diabetes or arthritis will be a compulsory part of the ...

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Music in the OR

It plays a significant role during surgery:

Music can become a subtle bone of contention among the members of the surgical team or a practical aid. Loud rock 'n' roll is good for routine operations, they say, Mozart for trickier ones. There is even a genre called "closing music": raucous sounds to suture by.

Imagine the fallout from successfully suing the world's most popular prescription medication:

Lawsuits filed this week claim that drug-maker Pfizer has failed to warn doctors and patients about serious possible side effects of the cholesterol-lowering drug.

The two lawsuits claim that Lipitor caused lasting, debilitating muscle and nerve problems -- including memory loss. Mark Jay Krum, a lawyer based in New York and Philadelphia, last Wednesday filed the ...

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Check out his new digs.

Too bad that litigation worries are impeding technological advances in medicine. All the more reason why e-consults and internet communication with patients won't be embraced in the US:

For medical malpractice attorney Veronica Richards of Pittsburgh's Richards & Richards, a former nurse practitioner, the increased use of virtual house calls is cause for concern. Internet communication doesn't offer the clarity and directness of a face-to-face diagnosis, she warned, ...

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