Dr. Rob gives us an MRI interpretation that is long, but not really helpful. Is the radiologist trying to protect himself from liability?

Spending more time with the patient is one reason (hey, maybe billing by the hour would solve this issue).

Pallimed skeptically looks at the recent report: "I am still holding my breath for the article that says pain control is not too hot or too cold but just right."

Panda talks resident work-hour restrictions:

So why not starve residents? We deprive them of sleep every third or fourth day, why not make it a clean sweep and withold food and water as an additional character-building exercise, especially if we're to operate under the theory that tired residents are as effective as well-rested ones?

IT security is so strict at this hospital that some doctors resort to using a neighboring house's Wi-Fi to get on the internet:

This Blog recently talked to an information-technology director at a mid-size hospital who says that visitors, doctors, and even the IT department routinely log on to "Monkey Business," the unsecured wireless network in the house behind the hospital. The hospital's network only allows registered computers to connect ...

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Tony Chen asks if the healthcare community can learn from Facebook. Some new Web 2.0 companies are certainly trying to fill this niche (Sermo, iMedExchange, and Revolution come to mind).

Physicians should switch to a billable hours system. Lawyers are now breaking the $1,000 per hour mark, while physicians are taking it hard with an impending 10% Medicare fee cut next year.

Here's what a trial lawyer says about breaking the $1K per hour barrier:

"Frankly, it's a little hard to think about anyone who doesn't save lives being worth this much money," says David Boies, one of ...

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Just two.

Must-read op-ed that lays out the arguments:

In discussing the morality of a single-payer system, those efficiency considerations are irrelevant. In discussing the morality, one thing matters1: who is made better off, and who worse off, by the system?

Most advocates of single payer, I think, care most about this justice claim. They may also think that they can make the system more efficient, but if one could ...

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Moose farts are partly responsible for the climate change:

Norway is concerned that its national animal, the moose, is harming the climate by emitting an estimated 2,100 kilos of carbon dioxide a year through its belching and farting.

Norwegian newspapers, citing research from Norway's technical university, said a motorist would have to drive 13,000 kilometers in a car to emit as much CO2 as a moose does in ...

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The WSJ picks up on the effort to protect physician reputations:

Next time you go to the doctor, look for a new form buried in the stack of insurance and health-history paperwork you're asked to complete. You might find a contract that would require you ask your doctor for permission to grade him or her online.

It's the brainchild of Medical Justice, a company that already provides doctors ...

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How many holes can he poke?

First let's acknowledge that the U.S. medical system has serious problems. But the problems stem from departures from free-market principles. The system is riddled with tax manipulation, costly insurance mandates and bureaucratic interference. Most important, six out of seven health-care dollars are spent by third parties, which means that most consumers exercise no cost-consciousness. As Milton Friedman always pointed out, no one spends ...

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That's the taxpayer burden. Lawyers for the inmates say it isn't enough.

A hospital's ad campaign means something different to Star Trek fans.

The old and the sick

Jane Galt says they bear some responsibility as well:

Moreover, as a class, the old and sick have some culpability in their ill health. They didn't eat right or exercise; they smoked; they didn't go to the doctor as often as they ought; they drank to much, or took drugs, or sped, or engaged in dangerous sports. Again, in individual cases this will not be true; but as a class, ...

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The case was decided in Wisconsin before caps were in place:

Angela Beauchaine, a resident in training at the hospital, was the only doctor sued in connection with the girl's death who was not covered by state malpractice award limits that shield fully licensed doctors. Tort reforms a decade ago capped awards, making doctors liable for far less in damages than Beauchaine faced.

The CMA denounces the practice, pharmacists are outraged:

"Despite their obvious skills, pharmacists don't have the totality of skills to make sound clinical judgments," said Gordon Pugsley, president of Doctors Nova Scotia. "It's an enormous leap of faith to think that care can be delivered at the same high level by someone other than a physician."

At their policy meeting, CMA members overwhelmingly endorsed a motion that reads: "The ...

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Amy Ridenour on the bias of the media coverage:

Although the Kansas City Star reported Thursday that a sister of the dead woman was "scared to death" that the husband might mistreat the woman, while another sister said the alleged killer "seemed pretty unstable," few media outlets included information about a possible motive other than, or in conjunction with, health care costs.

Likewise, few readers outside of Kansas ...

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"I'm going to be honest with you - I don't know a lot about Cuba's healthcare system. Is it a government-run system?"

- former Sen. John Edwards

(via Reason Magazine and David Hogberg)

Using the popular online game to study reactions to a virtual disease:

Epidemiologists, often lacking real-life disease explosions within the population, are studying epidemics within virtual worlds such as the famous "corrupted blood" disease that ripped through, and temporarily pacified, the World of Warcraft.

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