I think he's doing a pretty good job. Nice to see what goes on behind the scenes.

A case of missed ovarian cancer with a twist. This time, lawyers claimed the patient was at high risk of ovarian cancer (so-called hereditary cancer syndrome) and physicians should have anticipated the cancer.

Patient demand, and we all know that medicine is now a customer-service business:

Sometimes, demand is fueled by patients.

Patients with back pain often want surgery, says Thomas Sweeney II, a surgeon at the Southeastern Spine Center and Research Institute in Sarasota, Fla., a city where fusion surgeries among Medicare patients are performed at a rate higher than the national average, according to data gathered by Dartmouth researchers.


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They spent 6 hours trying to get this patient with a cerebral hemorrhage transferred.

The controversy of practice variability continues:

If you are dying in Miami, the last six months of your life might well look like this: You will see doctors, mostly specialists, 46 times; spend more than six days in an intensive care unit; and stand a 27 percent chance of dying in a hospital ICU. The tab for your doctor and hospital care will run just over $23,000.

Spend those ...

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What a bum:

The suspect contacted the parents of the football team after they submitted a classified ad through a newspaper, requesting help from a doctor to perform physicals. He responded and offered his services for $5 a player. The parents thought this so-called doctor was doing a good deed, but now they just want him found and arrested.

Once again, the ethicist preaches behind the walls of the ivory tower, while the PCP deals with reality:

"It would be much more useful for ethicist Marjorie Clay to explore why our reimbursement system, dominated by insurance companies, has progressively sucked the life out of primary care and forced untenable choices on most of my colleagues," Kanner wrote in an e-mail. "Everyone is stressed. Patients are rushed and unhappy....Despite ...

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The bubble lady

Officials don't know what to do with this woman with supposed "multiple chemical sensitivity syndrome":

Her goal was to get neighbors either to refrain from using such chemicals or to notify her before applying them.

Her condition and her campaign have left local officials and neighbors grappling with just how much responsibility they all have in coping with one woman’s ailment.

"It’s a pretty complicated situation," said ...

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Medpundit comments on the recent study suggesting that mammograms expose many to unnecessary treatment. The trouble with screening tests is that the problem of a false positive is a tough sell:

Most people want everything done just to make sure they're OK and that nothing gets missed. The problem is that those unnecessary procedures cost money. Most of the time, it's the government's or the insurance company's money, ...

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And lets you know it on his blog:

So what is my prediction about me and Pfizer and celebrity lawyer Ron Green?

Clearly I will win. But so far they have behaved like mad people and it is impossible to predict how people with no common sense will behave; what they do is anyone's guess. Meanwhile, if any future opponent to Ronald Green does a search on his ...

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Bingo:

Isn't it odd that a company could be so persnickety when it comes to pinching pennies from doctors and patients, and so cavalier when it comes to lavishing executives with hundreds of millions of dollars of shareholders' money?
Health Care Renewal with more choice words:
What has been missing from most of the discussion of the UnitedHealth Group debacle so far is appreciation for its health care ...

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A hospital CEO explains why:

We researched it and found that the remote is the one that is connected into our nurse call system, and the company did not have alternatives that would be more convenient. We checked with other hospitals in town and they all had the same limitations. Having these systems integrated reduces the number of separate handheld items hooked to the bed and allows the speaker ...

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Vote early, vote often

University of Pittsburgh Medical Center wants to bolster its US News hospital ranking. The CEO at Boston's BI-Deaconess hopes some of that voting magic would rub off at his institution. US News rankings are a big deal:

The U.S. News ranking has become a serious business for hospitals, which often incorporate accolades from the magazine in their own marketing campaigns. As such, it's not surprising that hospitals including ...

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Anonymous comments

After a "cooling off" period, anonymous commenting has been turned back on.

I request that comments stay respectful, or else I'll have to go back to requiring registration. Animated, passionate debate is fine. Personal attacks and excessive foul language isn't. I really am against moderating comments, but will delete obvious offensive or abusive comments. Thanks for abiding by this request.

Has hell frozen over?

Trial lawyers are asking regulators to consider seeking a rollback of malpractice rates at Connecticut Medical Insurance Co., saying the premiums for doctors appear excessive in light of the company's profits and surplus.

Carl D. Anderson, president of the Connecticut Trial Lawyers Association, sent a letter Tuesday to Insurance Commissioner Susan F. Cogswell urging a "thorough examination" of Connecticut Medical's malpractice rates.
More likely, they ...

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One important reason why health care is so much more expensive here:

Americans seem to be less willing to take no for an answer and more willing to try almost anything, no matter how expensive or how slim the odds, to prolong life. (The United States is also a fatter, more diverse country with wider income disparity, which gives our medical system a harder task.) . . .


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Can it be hope for Merck? The selling point is no weight gain. Trials show a decrease of 0.77 in A1c over 12 weeks.

I wonder why? Hmmm . . . actually, the article does a decent job explaining the obvious reason why there is such little interest in geriatrics. Every single incentive is geared against primary care and geriatrics:

Reimbursement drives doctors' compensation. Gastroenterology, for instance, became more lucrative - and popular - once Medicare, which sets the standard for most other health insurance, began paying for screening colonoscopies. Geriatricians ...

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He did the right thing - there's no need for an apology.

Don't let the door hit you on the way out:

Sick. Just sick. That $250,000,000 could fund 25,000 patients' annual health care benefit costs (if one assumes $10,000 per year of fees per patient). Such options transactions hurt our healthcare system and need to be made a felony.

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