More amazing than the fact that Dr. DeBakey invented the surgery that saved his life, is the fact that he was almost denied the operation . . .
But beyond the medical advances, Dr. DeBakey's story is emblematic of the difficulties that often accompany care at the end of life. It is a story of debates over how far to go in treating someone so old, late-night ...

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Breaking medical patents seems to me like we are robbing Peter to pay Paul . . .

As if you needed 10 more reasons, but maybe the guys should brush up on their 40 biggest mistakes first . . .

Blogger Turned Author

Dr. Centor over at DB's Medical Rants has started writing a short story entitled "A Lady with Spells" and the first chapter is quite good . . .

One of my favorite medical bloggers, Dr.
Today, it's usually the employer who decides what health plan the employee gets. Once patients start spending their own money on getting health insurance cover for themselves, the smarter health insurance companies which offer value for money and "put ...

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Training new professionals isn't the problem, keeping them however has proved to be more difficult . . .

The potential for abuse and retaliation is nerve-racking . . .

Most of the nation's hospitals and nursing homes will have to teach their employees how to ferret out fraud and report it to the government under a federal law that takes effect next month.

Award winning Respectful Insolence has a list of Christmas Carols from the DSM-IV . . .

A hilarious must read for anyone who has been frustrated by drug seekers . . .
3. If you've ever paused the show Trauma: Life in the ER at the exact moment that a doctor is writing a prescription for vicodin to see if you can decipher his DEA number, then you might be a drug seeker.

15. If you are asked to rate your ...

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I can understand the nightclub's concerns . . .

Stephen Ringold works for Clown Care which is "the first residential professional clowning program in a hospital."

I wonder if his clown friends ever work in the Operating Room . . .

Can you believe there are no only two published case reports of sword swallowing injuries . . .

Sword swallowers are more likely to sustain an injury -- such as a perforation of the oesophagus -- if they are distracted or are using multiple or unusual swords, finds a study in this week's Christmas issue of the British Medical Journal.

A brief story about 6 year old Hayden who is one of only 500 people in the world known to have Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva.

After Clinton's recent support of socialized medicine, I think a few excerpts of her original plan is in order:
"HHS will control the allocation of residency slots and (p. 129) assure preferential treatment of certain groups of persons."

"Wise allocation of resources: The nation should balance prudently what it spends on health care against other important national priorities.''

Uncle Sam just released a new tool to help compare insurance costs between different places on the map . . .

The Cheerful Oncologist discovers the miracle of life while contemplating the sadness of death.

The miracle of life is not that like the lucky patient we can sometimes avoid death for as long as possible - it is that we were given life in the first place.

Dr. Wes has a great piece on the insanity of banning 'unhealthy foods' that is spreading across the country.

Isn't it reassuring to know that if you cannot control yourself, or are victimized by making politically incorrect choices, others will be there to save you from your own behavior?

Dr. Schoor sums up our reimbursement model as "Complicated, convoluted, redundant, expensive . . ."

Is this an admission that the 'private sector' is superior to bureaucratic red-tape?

Einstein’s Riddle . . .

Do you think you are smarter than 98% of the people in the world? Prove it by solving Einstein's Riddle . . .

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