A cure for cancer

At least for cervical cancer. A panel unanimously recommended the HPV vaccine for girls aged 11 and 12.

Right on the money.

The ATLA president talks about malpractice:

The only places where people have trouble finding an OBGYN to do any procedure are in rural, poverty-stricken areas, where the OBGYNs don't want to live and practice. I do a lot of obstetrical negligence cases, and the cases seem to come out of poor areas. You see people getting better healthcare in big, urban centers, for the most part -- although mistakes ...

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Not enough ER docs?

Just throw money at the problem.

I always like to criticize articles on "must-have" medical tests, since they often get it wrong. This one isn't bad. There is a mistake on the bone-density test recommendation:

All women under the age of 65 should have one, but any post-menopausal women with risk factors should have one.
It should be all women over the age of 65 should have one.

Obese . . .

. . . or giant cyst?

A doctor is facing a charge of professional misconduct after allegedly failing to recognise a patient had a giant abdominal cyst.

A tribunal heard he told her she was overweight and prescribed diet pills.

The 44-year-old mother was eventually taken to hospital in severe pain, where a 14.7kg cyst was discovered and surgically removed.
Update:
Link fixed. Sorry.

The child is in need of a kidney surgery, but the mother wanted to find "other options":

The case of a mother who took her 9-month-old child on the lam, frantically searching for alternative therapies as state and medical authorities demanded kidney surgery for the boy, unfolded before the public last week like a high-drama television show. But at bottom, it pitted the rights of a mother and father against ...

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Sad to see. shrinkette has guest-blogged here several times, and will always be welcome to. She'll be missed.

Resident comic book expert/MD Scott takes an annotated look. For instance:

3. You Cannot Shock A Flatline When the heart goes into asystole (a term for when it stops beating and has no electrical activity), the treatment is NOT defibrillation. To restart a non-beating heart, the recommended treatments are CPR, epinephrine, atropine, and transcutaneous pacing. Defibrillation does more harm than good.

The strategy appears to be making their own generics, and trying to put little generic pharma out of business.

Barbaric:

BBC News on Friday examined the practice of "breast ironing" -- which some mothers do to their daughters in Cameroon in an attempt to prevent sexual advances of boys and men -- and a recently launched campaign to curb the practice. According to BBC News, breast ironing involves "pounding and massaging the developing breasts of young girls," most often with a wooden pestle and sometimes with heated bananas or coconut ...

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Find out here.

From an editorial this past weekend:

A single-payer system would guarantee that health-care services need to be rationed to control costs. Affluent Americans would buy access to health-care services that would be out of reach to lower-income Americans. Reimbursements to providers will decrease because the government is controlling the purse strings, causing fewer physicians to practice and the quality of care to decline. Our tax burden will grow and ...

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An insightful piece responding to the Canadian controversy allowing pharmacists to prescribe medication:

That said, I would trust a pharmacist over a PA or an NP when it comes to managing complicated drug therapy. There is no question in my mind about that.

There would also need to be a better way to keep (and share!) medical records with other providers. It would be awesome if everyone could ...

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Apparently it's more common than you think:

The biggest problem about this game "” besides its potential deadliness "” is that it's fairly easy to hide. Accurate numbers on how many teens try it are hard to pin down. A New Hampshire medical examiner who handled the cases of two teens who died playing the game told the American Academy of Pediatrics that it "boggles my mind how prevalent ...

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Indeed:

Although 70 percent of malpractice cases are either dropped or dismissed by the plaintiffs, being sued exacts a terrible toll. I won my own case at trial in 2002 after six years of litigation, but not a day goes by that I don't think about what I lost in the process in terms of the weeks spent reviewing, preparing, educating lawyers, being deposed and finally going to trial. ...

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So says a naturalist. He's right. Here's what he prosposes:

What if we had a system where you paid your healer a small monthly fee to help keep you healthy? Under such a system, the healer is financially punished when his or her patients aren't healthy. There's actually a financial incentive for the healer to make sure that everyone stays as healthy as possible. That would be ...

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They are re-emerging in China:

The case of a poor mother from the Chinese countryside hired to breastfeed an affluent city-dweller's baby has stoked controversy over the ethics of the ancient practice of wet nursing.

Professional wet nurses have appeared in major cities across China, the Beijing News reported on Wednesday, fueled by rising incomes and a demand for healthy milk.

I wonder if the JNC will follow suit.

Maria hosts this latest effort from the "literary" medbloggers. I particularly enjoyed Dr. Charles' contribution.

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