Partly due to tort reform. Another success story.

It puts the doctor in a dilemma where there are no good options.

It's mandated employer health insurance - and the businesses aren't happy.

A recent malpractice case nets $20 million. The "percent blame" seems amazingly specific to me:

Shanin Specter, an attorney for Lee and his parents, said the jury concluded the hospital was 60 percent responsible for what happened to the child, and that Dr. Ara Moomjian, the head of the neonatology unit, was 35 percent responsible . . . He said the jury concluded that Koller's medical practice was four ...

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They're worried that this will deter families from moving there:

The long term implications of going off Island for all baby deliveries could have a ripple effect on the financial and tourist sectors, if professionals with young families decide against moving to the Caymans, because of limited Obstetrician services.

Bad move - and I hope that they're covered by malpractice insurance. Previously discussed here.

The scary thing is, often the diagnosis is unclear yet still empirically treated. Good for the drug companies I guess:

The confusion is due in part to the patchwork nature of the health care system, experts say. Child psychiatrists are in desperately short supply, and family doctors, pediatricians, psychologists and social workers, each with their own biases, routinely hand out diagnoses.

But there are also deep ...

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Advair is a combination steroid and long-acting beta-agonist for asthma control. It is non-generic and expensive. Witness how this asthma patient weighs the costs and benefits:

Now, here is the question... would I rather pay $15/mo and have constant asthma attacks but be able to "control" them with a rescue inhalor...

Or pay $104/mo plus the cost of a new albuterol inhalor every month or ...

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Another insurer squeeze-job. Blue Cross wants mental health patients to fill out highly sensitive questionnaires to help gauge quality. Problem is, if they don't fill out the forms, providers get hit with reimbursement penalties:

But some psychiatrists are skeptical about the accuracy of self-assessments, and others say patients will be reluctant to divulge highly personal information.

"Who in their right mind would fill out such a ...

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Pharma Marketing Blog however, points out a negative correlation between new drug use and life expectancy. Try again PhRMA.

On the heels of the well-publicized BMJ study, he finds that Google still has a ways to go.

A lawsuit hits a physician very personally, which lawyers always fail to understand:

"I hear you joined the club," he repeated. "I read in the paper today you're being sued." I nearly dropped the phone and fell over. It was a local paper in Oregon to which he referred, no longer part of my world. I'd heard not a damn thing about it; didn't know by whom or over ...

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According to this article, someone who fits this bill:

Problem patients may exhibit traits that include lengthy care histories from many providers, courses of care dominated primarily by emergency visits, constant complaints about past or current care, ongoing failure to pay for services, and consistent failures to adhere to advice and instructions. These traits are common in plaintiffs and litigious patients. Prudent practitioners who identify these traits early may discharge ...

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Akin to the standardized patient, this group takes it one step further, using theater to help with physician-patient communication. (via The Patient's Doctor)

Specifically, testicular cancer, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, prostate cancer and multiple myeloma. The reason is that firefighters' exposures to carcinogenic toxins occur when they are in the vicinity of the fire, not just in the fire. (via Robotic Surgery Blog)

Maybe, and if so, they don't know why.

A study suggests that ER discharge instructions were either written at too high a level, or contained information that may be dangerous - including the suggestion of taking aspirin (which can increase the risk of bleed) after head injury.

Some of the medical complications are scary:

Other reports in medical journals include a sewing needle that disappeared during a do-it-yourself tongue piercing and had to be extracted by oral surgeons; a variety of serious, drug-resistant bacterial infections; hepatitis and tetanus; fractured teeth and nerve damage from tongue studs; as well as permanent scarring.

Don't look now, but that possibility may be closer than you think:

Despite all the trans fat scaremongering "“ aided in part by food companies caving in to trans fat-free alarmism by reformulating cooking processes or selling trans fat-free products "“ the Food and Drug Administration still classifies all uses of trans fats as "generally recognized as safe."

This classification obviously serves as a roadblock to successful personal ...

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Here is a right-wing view:

I'm of the opinion that it would be immoral to deny someone emergency medical services, regardless of their legal status. However, I don't believe hospitals should provide long-term care to illegals.

In other words, break your leg and head to the hospital, then you get treated whether you're legal or illegal. On the other hand, if you'll need regular long-term treatment and you're not ...

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