Executives and surgery

Sometimes, you have to pry that BlackBerry out of their hands. (via The Medical Quack)

A medical student finds out what happens to breast implants during gross anatomy lab:

The most interesting part of the implant was the reverse side, which had circular spots of scored silicon. These textured spots act as anchoring points for the body's natural connective tissue. In other words, the body grows into the implants. Women have to routinely massage their implants (at least the older implant I saw) to ...

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Some find the association between medicine and money distasteful. In this day and age, there may be no choice. Doctors also need to be good businesspeople:

When physicians see a patient, they do not usually know their account status. A good doctor DOESN'T WANT to know and that may be one reason many primary care physicians are struggling financially.

That makes it 5 years in a row since tort reform.

And she is going to the state Supreme Court:

Ms. Currier says she runs a high risk of failing the test unless the National Board of Medical Examiners gives her additional break time to pump breast milk for her 4-month-old daughter.

The board has refused the request, and on Thursday, Ms. Currier asked a Massachusetts Superior Court judge to order it to give her extra time on each of ...

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A lucky catch

A doctor tests out the hospital's new CT scanner that evaluates the coronaries. What a surprise he found.

Fascinating insight from a Kaiser ER physician.

Abdominal compressions

A new CPR technique?

The new technique focuses on applying pressure to the abdomen rather than the chest, and according to the research, the study "provided 25 percent more blood flow through the heart muscle without retrograde flow in the coronary arteries," all while reducing the chances of damage to the rib cage.

The million dollar question. Panda suggests it's the profound lack of common sense:

The effects of this lack of common sense, trying to practice zero-defect medicine among a terrifically unhealthy, mostly non-compliant, and litigation-happy patient population are legion and spread their costs and inefficiencies throughout the system.

ERnursey on what's wrong with these surveys:

By forcing the doctors to give them want [sic] to keep them happy you are completely negating all the years of medical school and specialized training that doctors have to learn how to diagnose and appropriately treat people who are ill and injured. If all we want is for them to be happy we don't need doctors or nurses, we can just sit ...

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Some estimates are as high as 50 percent of journalists being pampered by Big Pharma.

Something physicians' handwriting is good for:

ePrescribing has taken one huge factor that makes forgery difficult. The human handwriting factor. All of us 'know' a doctors handwriting or writing habits. The out of town or new doctors that we don't recognize we call on. ePrescribing takes care of that. There is no human element to Rx's now days. Everything is generated by a computer, the same type of computer ...

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The non-compliant patient

What is your threshold for whipping out the AMA form? Fat Doctor with a couple of non-compliant patient cases. The Physician Executive comments on her piece.

Physician Adam Fox is somewhat of a medical slang guru.

Making hospitals quieter

Johns Hopkins is enlisting the services of an acoustics professor:

Studies have shown that noisy environments slow healing. When staff and patients have to talk louder than normal to overcome the din, it increases fatigue and the chance that someone will misinterpret what's being said - a serious problem in settings where doctors order medications and medical tests.
(via the WSJ Health Blog)

Shifty eyes and the EHR

With EHR use increasing, physicians are looking more at a computer screen than the patient:

Although the computerized system has proven to be a huge help, I have confronted an unexpected challenge: Despite repositioning the computer in every imaginable way, I often find myself making more eye contact with the screen than I do with my patients. It is simply more difficult to face a patient while typing than ...

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Toni Brayer says justice was served again:

No one should point fingers at anyone who was a victim and caught in this storm. Evacuation was not possible for thousands of people. They did not have the transportation or the ability, during a rapid flood, to evacuate bed ridden people. The Manganos did not abandon their charges and I can only imagine how difficult and frightening that awful night must ...

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Most health care reform plans don't address the physician shortage, leading them to be useless:

Sampson was enrolled in a plan run by a subsidiary of Boston Medical Center called BMC Health Net. But before her benefits would take effect, she had to find a primary care doctor. That's when her frustration with the new system reached a boiling point.

Sampson started calling primary care doctors within a half-hour ...

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Canadians have had enough of their single-payer system and want some changes:

If the health-care system cannot access the resources necessary to speed along two such serious diagnoses, how hopeful can that make the rest of us about ever receiving proper medical care when it matters most? I fully support the claim of both these patients "“ if Ontario doctors are so impeded by lack of resources within the ...

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Trouble in paradise?

Problems with the French health care system? Someone tell Michael Moore!

"It's true we really have good access, but what if the system is not sustainable anymore?" says Teil. "It's going to break. It's going to blow. And then no more accessibility for anybody."

Tiel says the cost of France's socialized health care is growing faster than its economy. Workers pay about fifty percent of their paycheck each ...

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