Expect drug companies to adjust pricing as this practice becomes widespread.

ABC News takes a look.

GruntDoc and others can't get their feed published at Medlogs. As it gets fixed, one option to stay up to date would be to use the feeds page here.

I'd like to keep it as updated as possible (i.e. including only regularly updated blogs), since I use it to steal find the links I blog about throughout the day. Contact me if you want your blog ...

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EMRs: Where more is less

Doctor comments on JAMA's recent EMR commentary:

Moreover, EMR encourages everyone to copy-and-paste the notes of everyone else so that notes become the same from author to author as well as from day to day. Even consultants are assimilated into the oneness of the EMR Borg. A cardiology consultant recently copied-and-pasted the intern's note into his own, even including "consult cardiology in AM" in his recommendations. Perhaps he meant ...

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This NY Times article thinks so:

I fear there's something else at work -— a fear borne out by a flier my fifth grader brought home saying that at the monthly pizza hot lunch, no child would be allowed to buy a second slice of pizza. The district says the new ruling is to avoid bad feelings caused by "inequities": if everyone can't have extra helpings, no one can.

From the Singapore Cancer Society.

Welcome to primary care in the USA:

To use the same fast food analogy, imagine a situation where price was no longer an issue (because of insurance) and the hungry masses started demanding the best burgers in the world . . . . but they wanted to wait no longer than they did for the regular "McDonaldized" burger. The problem is that the amount of money that the restaurant gets ...

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On-call, 24-style

Orac takes us through a call night of an academic surgeon.

It shirks its payments and now picks on hospitals serving the poor:

The trouble began in 2004 when Oxford agreed to a new contract that increased the rates it paid the hospital, then continued to pay the old rates for more than a year, according to both Jamaica and the New York State Department Center.

That cost the hospital tens of millions of dollars, but the loss is ...

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This must put him in an awkward position:

According to the lawsuit, Patty Phillips went to the hospital's emergency room March 19 with extreme abdominal pain. Her husband said he was certain it indicated a serious intestinal problem that required immediate surgery.

Instead, he asserted in the lawsuit, she spent hours in a bed without standard monitoring machines in a storage area outside the hospital's radiology unit before she ...

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Having such as fully-developed third arm is rare:

Neither of the boy's two left arms is fully functional and tests have so far been unable to determine which was more developed, said Dr. Chen Bochang, head of the orthopedics department at Shanghai Children's Medical Center.

It is because of the jury's unpredictability that leads to payouts and settlements:

The trial bar desperately wants the unpredictable nature of a jury to remain in the equation. Even though most cases that make it to court are won by the physician, the unpredictability of the outcome encourages physicians and their insurers to agree to a payment for an alleged error, even though in some cases the ...

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Hospitals seem to think so.

And I thought I was young when I graduated medical school. Not compare to these siblings:

When Sugar Land siblings Shilpa, Shinil and Shiwan Shah moved across country for medical school, they were just 16 and 17 years old. Their mom came along, cooking meals and caring for them while they studied at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-School of Osteopathic Medicine.

The three ...

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Must be read to be believed:

Four times, Dr. Frank Bonnarens was sued for malpractice, and four times, the lawsuits were dismissed.

So after a fifth suit was filed and later dropped, the Louisville orthopedic surgeon fought back -- filing his own suit against the moonlighting state government attorney who had sued him in the fifth case . . .

. . . But the president of the ...

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Think the lawyers were tugging on any heartstrings?

Given her condition since the 2000 procedure, the woman offered her husband a divorce -- a man she met on a blind date, just a day before he left for the Vietnam War.

She told him she'd understand if her husband of 35 years, the father of their two children, the one who sent "Love Is ..." cartoons with all ...

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I've ragged on Forbes before for their health "advice", but here's a good one:

Here's another tip: If you don't require emergency care, make an appointment with your doctor. Using the emergency room for routine medical care is a good way to start sinking into debt.

"You might get charged $1,000 for walking in the door," Cecere cautioned.

Meet John E. Curran: "Curran claimed to be a physician and 'natural healer,' a doctor who treats diseases with natural agents like air, water or sunshine."

Amazing story:

A top New York heart surgeon who was doing a mercy-mission operation on an 8-year-old boy in El Salvador had to scrub out in the middle of the procedure so he could donate his own rare-type blood to the patient.

Dr. Samuel Weinstein said he had his blood drawn, ate a Pop-Tart, returned to the operating table and watched as his blood helped the boy survive the ...

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Healthcare blogger analyst Fard Johnmar gives his take. Thanks for the shout out.