A 100% diagnosis rate via mammogram and/or pathology is an oxymoron. The NHS Blog Doctor sheds more light:

If you work in hospital medicine as either a Consultant Radiologist or a Consultant Hispto-pathologist you make a hundred decisions a day. And each and every decision is recorded and stored away for ever. Five hundred decisions a week or more. Twenty five thousand decisions a year. That is probably a ...

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A dermatologist is running the 10th annual Skinnies Awards. "For the 10th year running, skinema.com features the annual roundup of notable movie and celebrity skin conditions. This year features Brangelina, Katie Holmes, Johnny Depp, Joaquin Phoenix, Reese Witherspoon, and Harry Potter. Can you match those winners with the following skin issues: Scars, acne, tattoos, cold sores, frown lines, and syphilis? If not, the Awards are waiting for you at ...

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Bang on - this is what's wrong with our healthcare system. You can't have everything:

Americans want more health care for less money, and when they don't get it, they indict drug companies, insurers, trial lawyers and bureaucrats. Although these familiar scapegoats may not be blameless, the real problem is us. We demand the impossible.

The changes we truly need are political. We need to reconnect people with ...

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A family doctor in Canada is burned out:

"You think you can save the world and so you take everyone on," she said. "That was a mistake."

She described a typical day. She might get called out at 2 a.m. to deliver a baby. Then, about six hours later, she'd be at her office, seeing maybe 50 patients until about 5:30 p.m. Then she'd stay in the office until ...

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"By the time you read this, I will be dead."

A retired physician urged the Government yesterday to make assisted suicide legal as she took her life with the help of doctors at a controversial clinic in Switzerland.

Anne Turner, 66, who was suffering from the incurable brain disease progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), had seen her husband, Jack, die from a closely related degenerative illness four years ago.

More statin superdrug talk. First, claims about cancer (since debunked), now a study suggesting it can halt sepsis. Is there no end to what statins can do?

The VA is cutting health care. "More than a quarter-million veterans considered to have higher incomes could not sign up for health care with the Veterans Affairs Department during the last fiscal year because of a cost-cutting move.

Those locked out - totaling 263,257 in the fiscal year that ended Sept. 30 - have no illnesses or injuries attributable to their service in the military and earn more than ...

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JAMA reports that physicians and pharmaceutical companies are too close:

"My mother told me never to accept gifts from strangers. If a stranger wants to give you a gift, it's very likely they want something in return," said Jordan J. Cohen, president of the Association of American Medical Colleges and a co-author of the new proposal. "We've become overly dependent on these kinds of blandishments to support our core activities, ...

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Sex helps calm nerves before public speaking. "Full sexual intercourse offers the best results, psychologist says."

Grand Rounds 2:18



Welcome to Grand Rounds, the weekly best the medical blogosphere has to offer, and a hello to all the new readers from WebMD. I'm honored to be hosting for the third time - it has come a long way since Kevin, M.D. last hosted way back in 2004.

The phenomenon of medical blogs has been gathering increasing mainstream recognition, with ...

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Loss leaders - Emergency rooms are going through an expansion boom:

YET despite all these factors, investing millions of dollars in emergency departments does not seem to make sense at first glance. Hospitals in New York State have been losing money for seven years, according to the Healthcare Association of New York State, which represents hospitals, nursing homes and other health care providers, and emergency departments tend to be ...

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A pediatrician rebuilds his practice in New Orleans.

A neurosurgeon goes bare, and is taking heat for it:

Gold, the Boca Raton attorney suing Martin, said getting money from him is like trying "to get blood from a turnip. The practical problem is that no one will ever see a nickel." . . .

. . . "This is despicable that someone performs this type of surgery without insurance or at least a method to compensate people for ...

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Tip of the iceberg: The disgraced Norwegian scientist admits to more fraud. "He said Sudbo had admitted making up data for an article in the New England Journal of Medicine in April 2004 and another in the Journal of Clinical Oncology in March 2005, as well as one in the Lancet in October 2005 exposed as false a week ago."

Why is Medicare Part D floundering? One reason may be the government's "breathtaking arrogance".

The Malaysia Sun takes a look at health blogging.

The NHS is restricting the use of cholinesterase inhibitors to those with moderate Alzheimer's disease or worse. The efficacy data for mild dementia is minimal - with up to 30 to 50 percent showing no improvement.

Can the recent Supreme Court decision regarding the Oregon assisted-suicide law affect cases against pain specialists? Maybe:

"The U.S. Supreme Court sent the Justice Department a powerful message, told them to back off, and to stop meddling in medical care in the states -- as it was none of their business," he said. "We can only hope that the courts don't stop with yesterday's decision, as there's more that the ...

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Sleep tight in NYC, potential ground zero for a growing bedbug epidemic:

Bedbugs are back, and they're not just rearing their rust-colored heads in New York City. Experts say they're spreading to other states and countries. Exterminators who handled one or two bedbug calls a year are now getting that many in a week, according to the National Pest Management Association.

"There's an epidemic going on throughout the country, ...

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The next Vioxx trial is going to be held in a plaintiff's paradise:

Legal experts say Garza's case had little hope of making it to trial anywhere but the Rio Grande Valley -- a region viewed as one of the toughest jurisdictions for corporate defendants.

The Valley became the national poster child for the costs of lawsuit abuse in April 2002.