Hey, it's McFlushots!

But will parents buy that argument?

WhiteCoat Rants with a physician's perspective:

Here's the most important reason physicians practice defensive medicine to avoid lawsuits: medical malpractice judgments are arbitrary. Physicians have lost malpractice cases for giving a treatment and for failing to give the exact same treatment. Physicians have been sued for getting informed consent and failing to get informed consent. There is no set of rules that physicians can follow stating "this is the ...

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The medical arms race

How the flawed reimbursement system is at the root:

"Because of the way we reimburse today, providers really have to do this," Robinow said. "It's not like they're bad or greedy people. They are... competing for patients. Some of this is defensive: technology helps them retain their doctors and have a greater market share."

She said the fallout from ignoring the latest technology is losing business, so many providers ...

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Dildos and vibrators

Now that I've got your attention, here's some medical uses of sex toys:

What medical purposes do sex toys serve?

Strengthening muscles, for one thing. Women who suffer from incontinence or a prolapsed uterus can exercise their pubococcygeal muscles"”not to mention have more satisfying orgasms"”by doing Kegels. Those muscles get an even better workout if you use weighted barbells, balls, and spring-loaded devices. Men with prostate disorders might use ...

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A lawyer gets called out for channeling John Edwards:

In his closing argument to the jury, Fieger assumed client Walter Hollins' character in his mother's womb, his brain deprived of oxygen as he waited to be delivered.

"Doctors, nurses, I'm suffocating. Please help me to be born," Fieger told the jury. "I want to play baseball. I want to hug my mother. I want to tell her that I ...

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The business of medicine

Longtime readers of this blog know that business and medicine go hand in hand. Howard Luks agrees, and says that medical schools do a disservice when business isn't emphasized:

No question that our students are well trained in the science of medicine. Unfortunately, very few students prove to be well trained in the business of medicine. Many students are even embarrassed to ask questions pertaining to the ...

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Go Sox!

Doctor’s bags

Now a hot fashion accessory, thanks to McDreamy and Grey's Anatomy.

To no one's surprise, older physicians don't have much respect for our work ethic:

The survey went out to 10,000 docs, and 1,175 responded. It included several sections, including one that queried the older docs about young M.D.s entering the profession today. Answers on that front didn't change much between 2004 and 2007. In both cases, more than 60% of docs said young physicians are less dedicated and hard ...

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Post-op bleeding

No matter how hard surgeons try, it probably won't be totally eradicated.

How a once-legitimate term has been junked:

Although it once must have meant something to somebody, now it is just another marketing phrase to make people feel good about buying swill. Pleasantly scented swill, no doubt, but swill just the same.

Worrying about mortars

Something that this physician in Iraq has to think about regularly:

I didn't have far to go from bed to floor, and I began calculating if the attack would get me to work earlier or later. Many factors were involved. The insurgents had woken me before my alarm would have, which might get me in earlier. On the other hand, the recovery would interrupt the morning ritual, so if ...

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Tennis and your back

Not a good combination:

"Tennis requires more frequent, repetitive and rapid rotation from the lumbar spine than other sports," the authors wrote. Playing it is particularly detrimental "during the growth spurt." High-level tennis, in other words, can be brutal on the young.

No, it was pretty much dying anyways. (via Medrants)

Surgeons are typically aggressive with suspected appendicitis in pregnant women, as a CT scan would expose the fetus to excess radiation. However, a recent study suggests that the complications from a "negative appendectomy" are still significant:

New research published in the October issue of the Journal of the American College of Surgeons suggests that pregnant women suspected of having appendicitis are often misdiagnosed and undergo unnecessary appendectomies (removal ...

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The teen with a rare congenital disorder is getting a chin for his birthday.

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The health insurer is being investigated by the government, and its stock is getting crushed.



Is it the beginning of the end? The WSJ Health Blog on a company under siege:

The raid was timed to the quarterly meeting of the company's board of directors, the St. Petersburg Times reports. And several ...

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Alternative therapy

Are you "cheating" behind your doctor's back?

Some patients hide their newfound approach to health care from their usual doctor, and some just don't feel it's necessary to come clean, but keeping that secret can be harmful, doctors warn. Some alternative medicines may produce adverse effects when combined with over-the-counter medications, prescription drugs or other conventional medical approaches.

A record malpractice verdict against a hospital in Maine. This is despite what the malpractice pre-screening panel said:

The lawyer for CMMC, Chris Nyhan says the hospital is disappointed with the verdict. Nyan said the evidence was presented to a screening panel before the trial and the panel found the hospital and its staff to be in compliance with guidelines.

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