The post-CABG bra

Novel idea:



Dr. Kathryn King, a University of Calgary researcher, says her study of 481 women in 10 cities across Canada suggests those who wore the bra had significantly less post-surgical breast pain and discomfort, compared to women in a control group . . .

. . . The new design stops the weight of the breast from putting pressure on the surgical wound. It also ...

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A survey reveals the reasons consumers cite explaining high health care costs. They surely don't blame themselves. (via Managed Care Matters)

Say it ain't so:

We have two sustainable options: A Medicare-for-all system, like that in Canada, or a socialized system, like that in Britain and our own VA and armed services systems. The latter uses salaried physicians while the former still leaves room for fraud and overuse. In the end, health care can be either a social service or a market commodity, but not both.

But make no mistake ...

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retired doc on a recent NEJM perspective regarding Lilly and Xigris. Dr. RW and Health Care Renewal also chime in with their views.

This pundit isn't going on any medical tourism trips anytime soon:

However, Newsweek does not break out statistics on the types of Americans (all 150,000 of them - 0.2%) who go to get treatment in SE Asia. How many of these people are there for plastic surgery or gender reassignment?

They try to say it's the "cost."

That's nice. But if the doctor screws up royally, who are ...

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More stringent CME

A newspaper reader is pissed that a heart murmur was missed in a young athlete's death, and wants more physician CME:

Is it any wonder that the physician who examined young Bruda's heart missed his murmur? This observation dovetails with another brief article describing the restoration of Sen. First's (sic) medical license after his accountant falsified his submission to the Tennessee Medical Board. In light of this, you should ...

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. . . and how anti-depressants saved his life:

Before Katrina, I would have called somebody like me a wuss. Not to my face. But it's what I would have thought, this talk of mood swings and loss of control, all this psychobabble and hope-dope.

What a load of crap. Get a grip, I would have said.

And that's exactly what I did, through a door ...

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Controversy involving hard-line Muslims and whether their wives can be examined by male gynecologists:

France's leading gynaecologists have challenged hard-line Muslims to bow to France's secular, "modern" rules of society, and to stop insisting that their wives are examined by female doctors.

The heads of the French National College of Gynaecologists and Obstetricians issued a public declaration, rejecting any moves to undermine the principle that public hospitals are ...

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It’s the system

Graham responds to the primary care negativity on this blog:

Not to turn all single-payer on you, and I realize this is just one woman'Â’s story, anecdotal and all, but I honestly believe that a big part of the problem is our system. It'Â’s so mind-numbingly complex and wasteful (administratively and diagnostically) that by tolerating the system for so long, doctors have allowed it to become 15-minute office visits with ...

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Failure to communicate

A lab fails to notify a doctor of an elevated PSA. Guess who's paying the price:

But Lamantia had no way of knowing Gaytan needed further care, her lawyer said. The protocol at Kaiser is for the lab to notify doctors of abnormal tests, Iungerich said. When the lab does not call, doctors are not aware there is a problem, he said.

"In this case, there was a ...

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Are students these days more medically fragile?

Diagnoses now cover a range of behavioral issues, and Ritalin rarely is used. Students with bipolar disorder, depression, anxiety or attention deficit disorder are prescribed longer-acting medications. In most cases students can take them at home before coming to school, but there is the occasional child who needs medication on demand . . .

. . . Part of the increased ...

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An oncologist faces a lawsuit for treating a cancer that wasn't there. Was he targeted by a rival physician group?

Lawyers for Morrison trace the investigation to 2002. Morrison moved from Montgomery Cancer Center, where he was research director, to the Cancer Care Center of Montgomery, an affiliate of Southeast Cancer Network PC.

After the move, described as voluntary by Morrison's lawyers, they contend Montgomery Cancer Center began ...

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More controversy about hospitalists. Some patients aren't happy:

"If I'm in the hospital, I want my doctor to come and visit me. You better believe it," said Hill, 78, who is retired. "That's part of his job."
Well Mr. Hill, welcome to the world of decreasing reimbursement, pressuring office physicians to see more patients in the clinic. If you're not happy about this arrangement, I suggest getting involved ...

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This patient gets it

Follow-up to the bankrupt idealistic solo doc. This patient laments his loss:

I am disappointed with whoever is responsible for allowing a shortage on primary-care physicians. Our Dr. Matthew Masewic is closing his practice due to finances and high insurance costs, which are ridiculous.

It's sad and a shame to lose such a wonderful, kind doctor who is much needed and wanted. We pay high premiums ...

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Doctors respond to major studies and change practice, especially if there are medical safety issues:

"The results were notable - and to a large extent unexpected," says Paul J. Hauptman, M.D., cardiologist at Saint Louis University School of Medicine and lead author. "Not only did doctors appear to change practice when confronted with a potential safety problem, but they also did so far more rapidly than we expected."

Toilets for the obese

Another sign the obesity epidemic is out of control.

TBTAM waxes eloquent on the controversy surrounding hormone replacement therapy, in three parts.

Maybe:

"From the beginning, Merck has said it would look at this litigation on a case by case basis. That is exactly what we have been doing. It takes resources to back up our ongoing strategy and that is what this reserve increase is all about. We face a rigorous trial schedule for the rest of this year and into next year. We have the legal infrastructure in place across ...

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Tackling the obesity problem by making fast-food harder, and more expensive, to eat:

If the low "cost" of eating fast food is adding to the obesity problem, the solution involves increasing the cost, even in a nominal way. How do we give individuals the incentive to pay a little more -— increased physical exertion, lack of convenience -— to get their food? This is where a drive-through tax comes ...

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It shows how desperate the shortage situation is down under.

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