It's up to nine.

An important point that Michael Moore left out:

I pretend to go on a journey, like Moore, to discover how other countries handle the malpractice lottery. It turns out they have great answers for that as well. Without tort reform and malpractice insurance reform, doctors in this country will continue to order tests to cover their asses instead of being cautious but fiscally responsible. This issue is real and adds ...

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Fecal disimpaction

In considerable detail from Scalpel.

With the GP shortage, physicians in Canada can afford to pick and choose patients:

Apparently the workload has become too severe for some doctors and they would prefer not to see patients that require too much work (you know, the folks that are sick and really need a doctor). What I thought was most telling was the statement from one recently licensed doctor who said he was performing these interviews ...

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The Freakonomics Blog gets on reddit's front page. Stephen Dubner relates it to Dr. Groopman's book.

Great job with the summary. (via The Health Care Blog)

It's a pretty balanced take on the film.

An innovative model is being tried:

Rather, Qliance's target demographic is the working poor and uninsured. It does not accept insurance, instead charging between $39 and $74 a month for an individual, depending on age. (The older you are, the more you pay.) That fee covers most of what encompasses primary care, including office visits, phone consultations, common X-rays, and some procedures and lab tests. Other tests, including those ...

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CEO Jeffrey Segal mentions a frivolous case in an op-ed in today's WSJ:

In a recent case we dealt with, an expert witness detailed how a urologist had botched a vasectomy, even though routine postoperative sperm counts were, as expected, zero. Nonetheless, the patient's wife became pregnant.

A lawsuit gathered momentum based on an expert supporting the least likely hypothesis: surgical error. To almost no one's surprise, a ...

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This is an article from 2004, but I wonder why no one brings up the Indian Health Service when cheerleading for single-payer reform:

The health of American Indian tribes became the government's responsibility long ago, through treaties and other covenants signed in exchange for hundreds of millions of acres of tribal land. After generations of neglect, in 1955 the Indian Health Service took over, creating an independent, single-payer, government-funded system. ...

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The UK is considering it:

A 17.5% rise on fatty, sugary or salty food would cut heart and stroke deaths by 1.7%, the study in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health said.

Bayer is trying an unorthodox marking approach:

But to attract a younger customer, the consumer care division of Bayer HealthCare is starting an online game today for Aleve Liquid Gels, a product that was introduced in March. By visiting a Web site, www.aleviator.com, Internet users will be able to follow a fictional storyline that leads them through a series of clues, taking them in and out of social networking sites, ...

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Mostly because they are expanding too quickly and biting off more they can chew. Here are some red flags. (via Dr. RW)

Public demand for a zero percent death rate in surgery may have unintended consequences:

Dr. Thomas H. Lee knows the headline he wrote is provocative: "Is Zero the Ideal Death Rate?"

But the network president of Partners Health Care and associate editor at the New England Journal of Medicine is concerned that public reporting of mortality rates for individual cardiac surgeons carries unintended, perverse consequences. He fears that ...

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Emory is going against the grain with this new idea in ICU-level care.

Did this patient's iPod lead to further injury as he was struck by lightning?

Although the use of a device such as an iPod may not increase the chances of being struck by lightning, in this case, the combination of sweat and metal earphones directed the current to, and through, the patient's head.

Some coverage of Michael Moore's showdowns with CNN.

Peter Chowka:
"It does not seem unreasonable to think that Moore's performance with Blitzer on CNN was, in large part, calculated to generate controversy about and rekindle interest in the lagging Sicko box office . . . Moore's schtick was like throwing red meat to his large core fan base that already thinks that CNN is right of center, too ...

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Hospitals are working hard to streamline operations and improve efficiency. What do they get for this? A higher risk of red ink. Way to go fee-for-service!

"The good news is that Virginia Mason identified ways to streamline and improve care; the bad news is that the medical center's bottom line may take a significant financial hit as a result," said Hoangmai H. Pham, M.D., M.P.H., an HSC ...

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More headache mysteries solved:

A Chinese grandmother has woken up in hospital after doctors finally took care of her persistent headaches "” by removing a bullet from her brain.

Jin Guangying, 77, of Shuyang town, Jiangsu province, went to Shuyang Leniency Hospital for an X-ray, inset, only to be told the cause of her pain was an injury inflicted when she was 13.




(via ...

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Sid Schwab shares his thoughts on the matter:

Now, far as I know, it's a pretty-much universal recommendation of malpractice defense attorneys, and insurers, that surgeons NOT record operations. Why? Simple: in the same way that that barf-inducing, gargantuan photo swung a jury, so have videos, even -- hard as it might be to believe -- when nothing was all that significant. Hands shake instruments around. Bleeding occurs; it's ...

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