Apparently the pockets of the hospital and doctors weren't deep enough - he's going after the multibillion dollar construction company:

Kottkamp was close to death two years ago, after a devastating mold infection developed in his chest following heart-bypass surgery. But Kottkamp isn't suing the doctors or hospital, whose financial liability would be limited. Instead, he is targeting a multibillion-dollar building firm, contending its shoddy work allowed the mold into ...

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A pharmacist receives a bill for his recent hospital stay.

Chinese investors are betting big on sham or alternative medication companies:

Chinese people also are increasingly turning away from hospitals and doctors to pharmacies for minor coughs and colds, fueling a booming market in over-the-counter medicines. The market for those drugs grew 11% in 2005 to around 50 billion yuan, according to the London market-research firm Euromonitor International. Nearly 80% of Tong Ren Tang's products are sold directly to consumers ...

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Apparently, they didn't learn too much from Vioxx.

Medblog guru Fard Johnmar writes in MD Net Guide.

Think reimbursement doesn't matter? Consider this doctor who perhaps was too idealistic to practice in today's harsh realities facing medical practice:

His malpractice insurance rates also spiked - from $5,000 the first year to $22,000. He hadn't realized that more patients meant more risk for the insurance company. When Masewic saw the size of his rate increase, he had to take out a personal loan to pay it.

Every ...

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An ophthalmologist wants desperately to see the Mets:

You won't see this offer on eBay or StubHub: A Manhattan eye surgeon wants to buy your Mets playoff tickets, and he's offering the gift of sight.

Or Botox, if better vision isn't your thing.

Dr. Emil Chynn, 40, has posted an ad on craigslist.org offering either LASIK eye surgery or a Botox procedure in exchange for a chance to ...

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More details are emerging from the record breaking malpractice case. Let's look at the medicine behind the case:

On Aug. 9, 2000, Navarro, who was a professional basketball player in his native Philippines, entered University Community Hospital-Carrollwood with a headache, nausea, dizziness, confusion and double vision. He described a personal medical history of hypertension, diabetes and elevated cholesterol plus a family history of strokes to the triage nurse. ...

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Flu vaccine

There's lots of it this year.

Banning pharma gifts

Newsweek on banning pharma gifts to physicians. Whenever Stanford's recent ban is mentioned, remember the somewhat hypocritical stance they are taking.

Remember this guy? Maybe this would help:

A 60-year-old man with acute pancreatitis developed persistent hiccups after insertion of a nasogastric tube. Removal of the latter did not terminate the hiccups which had also been treated with different drugs, and several manoeuvres were attempted, but with no success. Digital rectal massage was then performed resulting in abrupt cessation of the hiccups. Recurrence of the hiccups occurred several hours ...

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More IOM ignorance

Dr. Centor on the idiocy of the IOM ER recommendations:

The arrogance of the report is highlighted in their belief that hospitals can squeeze in more patients than they have beds . . .

. . . I know members of the IOM committee. I do believe they want the best for patients. I do believe that are totally off base in their recommendations.

Great roundup with lots more to chew on. Previously mentioned here yesterday. Responding to a commenter here:

A commenter on Kevin MD's site says that the patient isn't going to get more than the insurance coverage plus the doctors' assets, but that's not necessarily so: the doctors and insurer are now adverse to one another, and the plaintiffs' attorney can sue the insurer for "bad-faith" failure to settle. ...

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A truly short-sighted move which creates more pressure on physician reimbursement. Long-term, patients will lose as physicians cut back services:

Health plans and medical groups endorsed the plan, accusing emergency room doctors of using consumers as pawns in a high-stakes campaign to boost reimbursement fees.

Doctors contend HMOs are trying to put a financial squeeze on their practices and pay the lowest rates possible to raise profits. They ...

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The government removed the salary cap to help relieve the doctor shortage, giving FPs a top salary:

"I rather suspect that if we're creating millionaire doctors, it's because they've seen a heck of a lot of patients," Smitherman said. "There are too few doctors and of course we want to get as much productivity as we can out of those that we have and financial incentive is the very ...

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You would think they'd learn after the first two times. Another miscarriage in an ER waiting room:

Alberta Health Minister Iris Evans said Wednesday she's "deeply concerned" that another woman has miscarried while waiting for help in a hospital emergency room -- the third in three months.

Evans said she is troubled that the latest case happened so soon after the Calgary Health Region outlined system changes to ...

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Dr. RW comments on this asinine tactic. More beds in the hallways I guess:

But now the IOM is recommending these practices cease, except in disaster conditions. That'’s all well and good, but what'’s the hospital to do when there’s no room in the inn? Dr. Kellermann writes that the IOM decrees "Hospitals can achieve this goal by adopting operations-management techniques and related strategies to enhance efficiency and ...

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A $217 million (!) verdict, but of course, "This isn't about money, this was about the quest for justice."

Some choice quotes from the plaintiff lawyer:

Family attorney Steve Yerrid said he'll pursue damages from the insurance company, which is now claiming in a lawsuit that it has no duty to defend Austin because the doctor breached his contract.

"We're coming after them next," vowed Yerrid, who was ...

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Ban the medical slang

A patient advocate wants to strike the term "frequent-flyer", amongst others:

Mr Cayton, the national director for patients and the public, said of the term frequent flyers: "It implies that somehow these people want regular trips to hospital, that they are collecting points, that they enjoy the health and life-threatening roundabout of continual admission, treatment and discharge."

Other phrases, such as bed-blockers, shifted the blame from the NHS ...

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Some education is clearly needed here:

"It is a real indictment of our education that teenagers are so fearful that they are prepared to do something that is enormously damaging to themselves and and their babies because they think there might be an outside chance it might make their labour easier. Which is largely a myth."

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