A tragic case, and in the end the patients lose:

We often contend that America needs a better system for dealing with dangerous doctors, instead of "jackpot justice" litigation that makes lawyers millionaires. Perhaps impartial adjudication could compensate for injuries at much lower cost. But as long as officialdom doesn'Â’t head off such practitioners, and no better method is created to resolve their outrages, the risk of bankrupted hospitals ...

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No wonder the problem isn't going to go away soon:

About 40% of obese people also said they do vigorous exercise at least three times a week, the telephone survey found.

"There is, perhaps, some denial going on. Or there is a lack of understanding of what does it mean to be eating healthy, and what is vigorous exercise," said Dr. David Schutt of Thomson Medstat, the Ann Arbor-based ...

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They even suggested introducing gangrene to justify the amputation:

Three doctors are being investigated by Indian medical authorities for offering to amputate beggars' healthy limbs so that they attract more money.

They were secretly filmed by the news channel CNN-IBN apparently offering to remove a leg for £120 and were said to be colluding with the crime gangs that control begging in cities.

One doctor, from a government ...

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They should be rewarded instead:

Ipswich Hospital, in Suffolk, which is more than £16m in the red, accidentally breached an agreement to ensure all patients had similar waiting times.

Ipswich Hospital agreed with the East Suffolk Primary Care Trusts, which fund treatment, that patients should wait at least four months for treatment.

However, doctors had treated patients inside that time and the trust refused to pay the ...

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The ultimate direct-to-consumer approach. (via PharmaGossip)

They allowed themselves to be bullied for the sake of profits.

Men who breastfeed



Bizarre. (via Fat Doctor)

And will he use this as an excuse for his tirade?

It took 3 days before the mistake was noticed:

A physician assistant and a nurse present during the surgery said the surgeon "was working in the exact location you would expect...(the gallbladder) to be located," according to the DPH'Â’s investigation report.

However, the patient had a lot of internal inflammation and an unusual internal anatomy, which made the surgery more complex, Muller said.

"From a medical standpoint, absolutely ...

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That's gratitude for you:

Police say they found a suicide note in Edeen's pocket in which the shooter complained about bad doctors in Nevada.

Ostrowsky, a 55 year old endocrinologist, was hit in the neck, jaw and shoulder. He has a bullet lodged dangerously close to his spine, but he survived the shooting and he thinks there's a reason for that . . .

. . . Edeen ...

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Hospitals and physicians' offices want a piece of the action:

The Wall Street Journal on Wednesday examined how an increased number of traditional health care providers -- "driven by the threat of new competition, the opportunity to recruit new patients" and quality of care issues -- have begun to compete with and enter agreements with retail clinics -- low-cost, walk-in facilities often located in supermarkets, pharmacies and large retail stores. ...

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A duodenal ulcer is a leading possibility.

She certainly has her enemies:

"This idea that money is evil and academia is made up of saints is nonsense," Dr. Stossel said. "Some of my vaunted academic colleagues would run their grandmothers over." He favors disclosure, too, he said, but journal editors "have acquired halos and become arbiters of scientific morality."

"There's this myth that if Mother Teresa, the Dalai Lama and Catherine DeAngelis got up and ...

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Dr. Zuger writes about how they thrive:

Doctors without patients: can such creatures really exist? Or do they automatically negate themselves into some other sphere of existence, a cloudy existential plane where teachers without students and merchants without customers all wander around in search of a new identity?

It is a purely rhetorical question, because not only do doctors without patients exist, they thrive. They top most heaps: ...

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Workshops are available to orient immigrants and refugees to the American diet:

One of the major challenges for organizers is to change the way the refugees think about food. Many of the new arrivals suffered from malnutrition and came from places where food was scarce.

Some want to make up for a lifetime in which they were denied meat. Others gravitate towards the fizzy orange drink and crisps, ...

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And expensive:

Twenty years ago, it cost $75 to $100 to immunize a child with the four available vaccines. Today, 12 are generally recommended for kids and adolescents, at a private-sector cost of about $1,250.

And the government is expected to recommend a 13th vaccine for girls -- a shot that protects against cervical cancer. It costs about $360 for the three-dose series, potentially raising the per-child vaccination ...

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The price of quality shuttlecocks have gone up:

But now, shuttlecock makers are having to settle for substandard feathers, and the sport's devotees in Southern California say the birdies they're buying just aren't the same.

"Everybody complains now, 'What's wrong with the shuttle?'" Dan Chien of El Monte said after a practice session at the San Gabriel Valley Badminton Club. "It was goose feather, but now it feels almost ...

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These two ERs want to put an end to it:

After evaluating patients who come to the emergency room, nurse practitioners or physician's assistants will inform those with nonurgent symptoms that they can seek treatment at a specific community health clinic.

Patients who insist on staying will have to pay a $150 deposit before being treated in the emergency room or an $80 deposit to be seen in urgent ...

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Lack of primary care and outpatient services. It's only to get worse given the crisis primary care is in:

Instead, the people clogging the ER are the insured who can't reach their regular doctor. Cunningham found that communities with fewer or busier doctors tended to have higher rates of ER use. It makes sense -- ERs are open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Unlike at a ...

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In cases that go wrong, they are highly sought to be expert witnesses against the referral source.

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