Another story from a single-payer world:

The major benefit of living in Canada, which is drilled into the heads of all young Canadians, is that health care is free; my friend will not have to pay a cent to have her knee repaired (aside from a lifetime of high taxes, of course). But, as I'm sure that you are aware, she will have to wait. Instead of having her knee ...

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The chain of command is entrenched on the hospital wards, creating an obstacle to speaking up:

This new division of labor established hierarchies. On the top were the senior physicians who made rounds on the wards once or twice daily. Next were the overworked residents, who essentially lived in the hospital while training. Last were the medical students, who spent the most time with patients but were most assuredly ...

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Her experience with the diagnosis and treatment of Chiari malformation.

A sign that the FDA may be changing philosophy:

The goal was once to continuously expand the pharmacopeia of available drugs, as long as each drug was safe. But, apparently, not anymore. In voting 20-1 to reject Arcoxia, FDA's advisers said that for certain ailments, we have enough medicines. This will ultimately deny patients needed choices and it reflects a dangerous way of looking at drug development, safety, and, ...

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Horrifying. Drudge links to the absolute latest. Psychologist Helen Smith has articles on mass school killings. (via Instapundit)

Roy Poses does the honors.

A reason why "Medicare for all" will fail:

As many people now understand, fee-for-service medicine pays doctors more for treating illnesses and injuries than it does for preventing them - or even for diagnosing them early and reducing the need for intensive treatment later.

That's one of the reasons why I haven't embraced "Medicare for all" as a meaningful model for healthcare reform. Most Medicare is provided on ...

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Peter Rost with a new smoking gun today. BrandweekNRX and Ed Silverman comment.

Female surgeons

Some barriers preventing women from entering the field:

Quinlan notes that, among surgeons, men are more likely than women to have spouses who do not work. Women are more likely to cite work-life balance as a reason for not entering the field. So he recommends making surgery a more livable discipline "” a change that would require a profound cultural transformation. "Sharing patients "¦ will need to be practiced ...

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Isn't a single-payer system supposed to solve these problems? Apparently not, as this scenario in Canada sounds suspiciously like what's happening Stateside:

With no ability to address changing environments in their businesses and the government "paying the piper", physicians soon began to lose their professionalism, and, as the only means of controlling their incomes, began choosing what they would and would not do, depending on time involved, remuneration per ...

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Pressure continues to mount on UnitedHealth in the LabCorp scandal, but what they are doing the physicians may just be the tip of the iceberg:

I agree that UnitedHealth has stirred up a hornet's nest with this notion of penalizing physicians for the behavior of their patients. I suspect that the company will not formally retract the policy because they may be desperate enough to actually enforce it, or ...

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Reimbursements for even routine vaccines like the MMR are hurting the vaccination coverage for children:

Pediatricians spend tens of thousands of dollars and must frequently wait months before payment by payers (including Medicaid and private health plans). Often payments are below the cost of the vaccine. Gardasil, the new cervical cancer vaccine, costs physicians $360 for the recommended series of three doses per person. RotaTeq, the vaccine against diarrhea-causing rotavirus, ...

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Backlash continues on Michael Moore's Cuba stunt, with some revealing pictures:

Only, it isn't the best. Not near it. Those foreigners and wealthy people who go to Cuba, including the people that Michael Moore are bringing down, are only shown the few top of the line facilities which probably are some of the best in the world. It's a huge propaganda campaign aimed at deceiving people into believing that Cuba ...

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A story in today's WSJ questions Gardasil's efficacy:

But behind the scenes, Gardasil has been dogged by uncertainty about how effective it really is. Merck won approval for the vaccine based on research that showed it protected against two strains of the human papillomavirus, known as HPV 16 and 18, that are thought to cause 70% of cervical-cancer cases. The Food and Drug Administration didn't ask its panel of ...

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Bruce Kesler points out that the majority are quite happy with their health care:

As I pointed out here, the Trojan Horse of the uninsured is overstated, to propel nationalized health care, and used to undermine the health care of 80% of Americans. The latest poll of the privately insured (consistent with many other polls), for example,
. . . found most U.S. workers are very satisfied with their ...

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One stunt is detailed in the NY Post. Get ready for some single-payer love in his upcoming film:

Filmmaker Michael Moore's production company took ailing Ground Zero responders to Cuba in a stunt aimed at showing that the U.S. health-care system is inferior to Fidel Castro's socialized medicine, according to several sources with knowledge of the trip . . .

. . . But the sick sojourn, ...

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More are not willing to take the risks of specialty call in the ER. So hospitals are starting to show them the money:

Until recently, specialists accepted on-call shifts in return for admitting privileges. But many now expect to be compensated for keeping their beepers on during nights and weekends. The change in the relationship between specialists and hospitals is being debated in the medical community, with ...

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How to buy an M.D.

Two "anti-aging" osteopaths find a way to add M.D. after their names. Are they afraid of not selling enough books with their D.O. degree?

Both men received medical degrees in 1998 from the Central American Health Sciences University in Belize, without, they acknowledged, ever having studied in the country. Dr. Klatz and Dr. Goldman say through their lawyer that they earned their medical degrees with transfer credit from ...

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"Just admit the patient to medicine."

Been there, done that. It's the only service in the hospital that can't refuse admissions. Scalpel with another example.

Wear your seatbelts

Or else:

There are two major routes that unrestrained persons take in a front-end MVA (Motor Vehicle Accident). Up-and-over or down-and-under (AKA "submarining"). With up-and-over, the upper body launches forward and up. The head strikes the windshield. (This produces the classic "windshield star") Your injuries here include concussion, scalp laceration, and various brain bleeds. You can suspect fractured cervical vertebrae (and if you have a fracture with compromise to ...

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