November 2004 - Why DTC drug advertising sucks:

If the majority of DTC marketing were based on sound evidence-based medical principles, I would be in strong favor of it. After all, the more information patients have at their disposal, the better.

However, this is simply not the case, as the evidence seems to always interfere with profits. All we see are countless ads for erectile dysfunction, Singulair for ...

Read more...

January 2005 - Sometimes the fine print doesn't make for a good drug ad.

May 2005 - What kind of physician do you want, one who runs on time, or one who spends the time? You can't have both:

A typical visit to a primary care physician's office is allotted 15 minutes. Each physician session lasts 4 hours. Think about that. If the doctor merely spends 5 "extra" minutes with each patient, the last patient of the session will be over 1 ...

Read more...

January 2005 - Levitra and priapism:

So, what to do if you have an erection for more than 4 hours? Some say that conservative measures like walking up the stairs (to promote an arterial steal phenomenon) as well as ice packs to the penis and perineum can help. If not, then its off to the ER.

May 2005 - Patients sue a hospital. They they turned to federal court to force said hospital to treat them.

December 2004 - On full-body scams:

I have written before how full-body scans are not recommended. A recent study from the Archives of Internal Medicine notes the many misstatements in brochures advertising full-body scams - uh, I mean scans.

March 2005 - Rampant speculation on New England's favorite linebacker and whether he'd be able to play football again:

One is a patent foramen ovale (PFO). This is a condition where there is an opening between the upper two chambers of the heart that fails to close after birth. It is detected in about 25 to 40 percent of adults. A meta-analysis has suggested that those with a PFO ...

Read more...

Break

I will be taking a 10-day break from the blog. Enjoy the classic posts, which will continue in my absence.

Here are some reading ideas to consider in the interim:
1) Stay up to date with medical news and other medblogs on the feeds page.
2) Catch up on prior Grand Rounds.
3) If you can stand it, step into the fire and debate recent controversies ...

Read more...

More Mel Gibson analysis from the NY Times:

So where, exactly, did those words come from? (And not just the anti-Jewish comments, but also the less-noted crude aside about the anatomy of a female officer?) Was this alcohol-fueled soliloquy an ugly insight into Mr. Gibson's character "” in other words, in vino veritas? Or was it just the tequila talking?

Science, as it happens, has been hard at work ...

Read more...

There is sensible talk about including disaster physicians in the Federal Tort Claims Act:

Another option might be to waive medical liability altogether for doctors who treat disaster victims, she said. A similar policy was included in a medical tort reform bill that died in the senate earlier this year, which would have insulated doctors from liability for treating indigent patients.

However, Crawley was skeptical whether a ...

Read more...

Recent data suggests yes, perhaps to meet waiting time quotas.

The website lists plaintiffs who have brought unsuccessful cases. Patients have information on physicians' malpractice history. This evens the playing field:

The company, which says it's based in the Caribbean to shield itself from lawsuits, hopes eventually to expand into a nationwide database. An information page for doctors on the site reads: "A physician may feel that a patient who has filed a medical malpractice suit and ...

Read more...

Ted Frank cites a reason why Merck should not agree to a global settlement. (via PointofLaw.com)

A surgeon translates the cryptic comments and speculates on a diagnosis. (via Grand Rounds)

Culture clash

A story about the Chinese distrust of Western medicine. (via Grand Rounds)

Surgeonsblog contains the reflections of a retired surgeon on interesting patients and cases. This post shows how his early career could have been derailed:

At this stage I wasn't getting many referrals for major cases. So I was pleased one day within shouting distance of the previous events to see my office schedule included a lady with gallstones. Working though the patients preceding her -- lumps and ...

Read more...

In light of the recent firestorm regarding physicians' attitudes towards obesity, I asked Fat Doctor for her insight into the issue. She writes a post addressing this:

With my lack of control over food, I do feel like an animal in a zoo, trapped in a proverbial cage of shame and remorse and fear. Yes, it hurts me that complete strangers in the street stare. Yes, I am ...

Read more...

Apparently, they didn't have a mouthpiece to protect themselves.

A PSA to the 34 percent of doctors did not know that drug companies had access to their prescription writing history:

How important are the profiles to drug reps? "An enormous help," said Kathleen Slattery-Moschkau, whose 2005 film "Side Effects" is loosely based on her 10 years peddling pills for pharmaceutical giants Johnson & Johnson and Bristol-Myers Squibb. "They allow reps to enter doctors' offices armed and dangerous."

Slattery-Moschkau ...

Read more...

An opinion from a new medblog, House of Caduceus:

So, we as ED physicians and the hospitals that house us, are forced by law to see and treat patients who can't pay for services, and then are still liable for litigation by those patients when there is a bad outcome. I'm sorry, but if I am to be forced by the government to see and treat you, than ...

Read more...

Most Popular