Written by an OB/GYN, this is a novel where chapters are revealed weekly on this blog:

What would you do if your grandson needed a kidney transplant, but kept getting passed over when one was available? This is a novel in progress about an obstetrician who faced such a situation. I'll post at least one chapter per week.

Experts say yes:

"What motivates most mass murderers is the desire for revenge. They see themselves as victims. They see injustice around them and that they've been dealt a raw deal," Fox said.

"They blame others for their own failures and feel that life is just not worth living. Before they take leave of this life, usually by their own hand, they need to get some satisfaction by taking ...

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She apparently couldn't wait in line any longer:

A woman arrested for shoplifting has blamed the crime on irritable bowel syndrome, authorities said. Helen Gallo, 61, of Clearwater, was arrested Sunday after allegedly shoplifting from a Cape Coral grocery store, The Daily Breeze of Cape Coral reported.

Gallo reportedly told authorities that she could not wait in line because she has irritable bowel syndrome, according to the newspaper.

A study says that patients can manage some chronic illnesses. It dangerously suggests that patients adjust their own hypertensive medications:

They ask why the methods patients use to take care of their own diabetes -- monitoring blood sugar, injecting insulin, evaluating how well they are doing and adjusting dosage -- can't be expanded to other conditions. In one study they cite, patients with hypertension successfully used home blood ...

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A sympathetic lawyer writes after receiving his hospital bill:

...I feel like I'm stealing from this doctor and the surgical center....I'm an in-house lawyer, so I make decent money. And that's probably why I feel so horrible about this situation. When I was in private practice, I never would have agreed to take such a low amount of money on that bill.
Medpundit comments on the reimbursement battle: "We are mice ...

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Big Pharma, the play

A one-person play by Jennifer Berry. Here's a review:

Anyone who has experienced the assault of the pharmaceutical industry's marketing campaigns would appreciate Jennifer Berry's one-person play Big Pharma: The Rise of the Anti-Depressant Drug Industry and the Loss of a Generation. Since the mid-1990s, spending on drug promotion has grown steadily, reaching $21 billion in 2002. Berry explores the fallout of this expanded marketing blitz through the ...

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Dr. Wes:

Dear Mr. and Ms. Patient,

I regret to inform you that I will be spending less time focusing on your heart problem because I have decided to focus on the heart and medical problems that Medicare deems important to assure I get paid. They call this initiative "Pay for Performance (P4P)." . . .

. . . So, dear patient, I'm sorry if you have ...

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"Professional inpatient detoxification users" are one reason why Medicaid costs are out of control in New York.

Overlawyered with a roundup of physician first-hand accounts.

Another story from a single-payer world:

The major benefit of living in Canada, which is drilled into the heads of all young Canadians, is that health care is free; my friend will not have to pay a cent to have her knee repaired (aside from a lifetime of high taxes, of course). But, as I'm sure that you are aware, she will have to wait. Instead of having her knee ...

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The chain of command is entrenched on the hospital wards, creating an obstacle to speaking up:

This new division of labor established hierarchies. On the top were the senior physicians who made rounds on the wards once or twice daily. Next were the overworked residents, who essentially lived in the hospital while training. Last were the medical students, who spent the most time with patients but were most assuredly ...

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Her experience with the diagnosis and treatment of Chiari malformation.

A sign that the FDA may be changing philosophy:

The goal was once to continuously expand the pharmacopeia of available drugs, as long as each drug was safe. But, apparently, not anymore. In voting 20-1 to reject Arcoxia, FDA's advisers said that for certain ailments, we have enough medicines. This will ultimately deny patients needed choices and it reflects a dangerous way of looking at drug development, safety, and, ...

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Horrifying. Drudge links to the absolute latest. Psychologist Helen Smith has articles on mass school killings. (via Instapundit)

Roy Poses does the honors.

A reason why "Medicare for all" will fail:

As many people now understand, fee-for-service medicine pays doctors more for treating illnesses and injuries than it does for preventing them - or even for diagnosing them early and reducing the need for intensive treatment later.

That's one of the reasons why I haven't embraced "Medicare for all" as a meaningful model for healthcare reform. Most Medicare is provided on ...

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Peter Rost with a new smoking gun today. BrandweekNRX and Ed Silverman comment.

Female surgeons

Some barriers preventing women from entering the field:

Quinlan notes that, among surgeons, men are more likely than women to have spouses who do not work. Women are more likely to cite work-life balance as a reason for not entering the field. So he recommends making surgery a more livable discipline "” a change that would require a profound cultural transformation. "Sharing patients "¦ will need to be practiced ...

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Isn't a single-payer system supposed to solve these problems? Apparently not, as this scenario in Canada sounds suspiciously like what's happening Stateside:

With no ability to address changing environments in their businesses and the government "paying the piper", physicians soon began to lose their professionalism, and, as the only means of controlling their incomes, began choosing what they would and would not do, depending on time involved, remuneration per ...

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Pressure continues to mount on UnitedHealth in the LabCorp scandal, but what they are doing the physicians may just be the tip of the iceberg:

I agree that UnitedHealth has stirred up a hornet's nest with this notion of penalizing physicians for the behavior of their patients. I suspect that the company will not formally retract the policy because they may be desperate enough to actually enforce it, or ...

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