A man names his racehorse after his primary care physician. That's pretty cool.

Required reading. GruntDoc sees the beginning of the end:

People ask me what I think the future of medicine is when we're staring at the overcrowding, and ask what I think will happen. I don't think it's going to be anything cataclysmic, we're just going to grind to a halt at this rate. Money continues to be poured down expensive therapies of marginal benefit, there's no barrier to ...

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Fighting frivolous lawsuits with threat of a countersuit. Doctor's Advocate terminates their first frivolous malpractice case:

Dr. Coslett-Charlton's case stemmed from an incident earlier in 2004, when she met with a woman late in pregnancy for the first and only time. After an examination revealed drastic complications, she sent the patient directly to the hospital. The doctors at the hospital took over treatment of the patient. The ...

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US Olympic skiers are going to Mexico for a controversial treatment:

"I'm assuming (Ongley's) in Mexico for a reason, other than a suntan," he told ESPN. "The whole thing concerns me, that the guys have to fly off to a foreign country to do things that our medical department is saying, 'I don't see the medical value in it.' And we're not really comfortable with the guys doing it.


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The woes of telephone medicine continue. Any and all complaints should be sent to see a physician, or else this happens:

A daughter told last night how her dad died after pleading with NHS Direct for 20 minutes to see a doctor.

Owen John Jones called the helpline complaining of severe mouth pains and sweating.

But his daughter Rhian Whitehead said the operator failed to ...

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"I proudly proclaim myself a quack!" So says the founder of center where Coretta Scott King died. He further says:

"If a patient goes to an allopathic doctor for months or years and eventually is told, 'There is no more medicine can do for you,' and then that patient turns to an alternative practitioner who helps them and may even cure them - who is the quack?" he ...

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Irrational Exubera - finally some focus on its ridiculous cost:

Exubera's price could be a hurdle for subscribers of some health plans, analysts say. As a rule, health plans provide incentives for their subscribers to choose cheaper remedies over newer, more expensive therapies.

If managed-care plans decide to cover Exubera, analysts predict it will be placed in an expensive tier of a health plan's preferred drug list, known ...

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The Canadian province of Manitoba has the worst health care in Canada. Their government blames its constituents:

It hasn't been for a lack of money, either. The NDP has dumped billions more into health care since taking office, with very little to show for it.

The Conference Board report confirms that.

And how does Health Minister Tim Sale respond? He blames Manitoba's aboriginal and elderly populations.


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States want to take on the federal government, by challenging the Medicare drug plan in the Supreme Court:

A group of states aims to challenge the new federal prescription drug plan in the U.S. Supreme Court, California's attorney general said on Wednesday, alleging the plan could cost his state $750 million over the next three years.

California Attorney General Bill Lockyer said his state will bring the lawsuit and ...

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Dr. Charles writes on the importance of primary care:

I chose to become a family doctor for many reasons, but foremost among these was the fact that I believed in the specialty. The family doctors I learned from knew their patients not simply as anonymous diseases and puzzles from which to profit, but rather as spirited and poetically unique individuals with whom building a continuous doctor-patient relationship would provide the ...

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More ways insurance companies are gouging doctors. They are encouraging members to become more adversarial:

In February, Lumenos Inc., a unit of health insurer WellPoint Inc., intends to start offering a service that lets its patients enter the names of drugs into their cellphone Web browsers, which in turn will shoot back a list of comparable drugs, ranked by how much they cost under Lumenos's plans. That way, patients ...

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An upcoming book release recently caught my eye - The Death of Mammography: How Our Best Defense Against Breast Cancer Is Being Driven to Extinction. From the press release:

Mammography is still the only reliable tool available to diagnose breast cancer in its earliest and most treatable stages, though it can have up to a 30% miss rate. In The Death of Mammography ( Caveat Press 2006 ...

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A malpractice trial is delayed, 200 patient appointments were cancelled:

Attorneys for the defendants, physicians Juan Cevallos and James Cuffe, told Cobb that a continuance would cost their clients money because both had cleared their schedules for the week.

Defense attorney Andrew Bolin said Cevallos had to reschedule about 200 appointments so he could appear for trial this week.

They also argued that Newlon had adequate time to ...

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Wal-Mart is sued for not stocking emergency contraception pills. "The plaintiffs are Katrina McCarty of Somerville, Julie Battel of Boston, and Rebekah Gee, of Boston. All three were turned away when they tried to buy emergency contraception pills at area Wal-Marts."

Just in - the latest wait times in Ontario, Canada:

Last October and November, the average wait in Ontario was 34 days for cancer surgery, 138 days for cataract surgery, 150 days for hip replacement, 203 days for knee replacement, 46 days for an MRI and 30 days for a CT exam.

Kind of common sense: Anger precedes most injuries.

Malpractice by a naturopathic physician. It's called homicide.

Bizarre non-medical site of the week: The Lego Suicides. Various ways to kill yourself with Legos. (via kottke.org)

Many drugmakers are cutting their free or discounted medication programs. "Several of the nation's largest drug manufacturers say they will no longer provide free or discounted medications to low-income elderly and disabled patients because they should be covered by the new Medicare drug benefit.

But for about 1 million Americans with serious illnesses such as AIDS and cancer -- patients who last year relied on the pharmaceutical industry's ...

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"After Polite Sessions, Letters Filled With Anti-Semitism". Fascinating case from the NY Times:

It was hardly funny at the time, but my patient gave new meaning to the phrase "insane bigotry." There was no question that that he suffered from chronic paranoid schizophrenia. He had been seen at our clinic for many years before I was on the staff, and his pathology was voluminously documented. But it seemed that ...

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