Prostate cancer patients and patient advocates may be sending threats to prominent prostate cancer experts for opposing approval of a new drug:

Two prominent prostate cancer experts have been threatened for opposing approval of a controversial new drug and are being protected by bodyguards as they attend ASCO, The New York Times reports.

The experts, Howard Scher of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and Maha Hussain of the University of ...

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Short, unregulated hit pieces are getting some pharmaceutical executives worried:

These budding Michael Moores are a worry to the industry "because there are no internal controls on YouTube," says Dorothy Wetzel, former consumer-marketing chief at Pfizer and now senior VP-management supervisor at Saatchi & Saatchi, New York, where she works on AstraZeneca accounts. "But," she added, "you have to get used to it, because it's here to stay."
...

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A recent study looks at what kind of implants will lead to possible travel delays in the airport:

As part of the study, 129 patients with 149 various implants walked through an "M-scope three-zone" metal detector -- a common type at airports -- at high and low sensitivity ratings.

Half of the patients -- 52 percent -- sailed through without the implants being detected. They usually had small ...

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Some bloggers are criticizing the "unnamed Atlanta medical official" who revealed Mr. Speaker's identity:

We seem to agree that at least one of the anonymous sources who gave or confirmed the patient's name to the media may have violated one or more laws. My thought was that the unnamed "Atlanta medical official" violated HIPAA if the patient's identity was discussed within the official's professional work related to the case. There's ...

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Hillarycare

The WSJ on what she's thinking:

Mrs. Clinton also nodded at medical malpractice reform. She neglected, however, to support the proposals that would actually reduce costs, such as punitive damage caps and specialized medical courts. These, not incidentally, are also the programs most vigorously opposed by the tort bar.
Rich Lowry comments. (via Catron)

First Canada, now the Australians want the site shut down:

The Australian Medical Association said yesterday the website should be closed because it was irresponsible and lacked objectivity.
(via Dr. RW)

There is a one-year waiting list for physician license applications in Texas, thanks to malpractice caps:

Meanwhile, about 2,250 license applications await processing at the Texas Medical Board in Austin. The wait could be as long as a year for some of the more experienced doctors because it takes longer to review their records.

The fear is that some doctors will give up on Texas and go elsewhere ...

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I don't think I can add anything more to that title.

WSJ on the increasing diversity of medical students:

In the past 15 years, U.S. medicine has seen a huge influx of first- and second-generation immigrants. It follows and augments a different demographic trend that began 30 years ago with the acceptance of increasing numbers of women into medical schools. As a result of that earlier revolutionary change, half of new practitioners today are women.
(via a reader tip)

Coming clean

Blog with your real name and getting it cleared by your administrator. It may be what's needed for some medical blogs to continue.

GSK accused of paying physicians to keep quiet about Avandia.

A profile of Dr. Peter Rost, which Fortune calls "a professional pain in the ass" to the drug industry.

Paul Hsieh with an op-ed, giving the TennCare disaster as an example of government intervention failing:

The Tennessee government initially offered a generous benefits package. Predictably, costs skyrocketed because patients had no incentives to spend prudently. In response, the government attempted to control costs by slashing payments to doctors and hospitals.

Hospitals closed and doctors left the state in droves. Many doctors who remained stopped seeing TennCare patients since ...

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Medgadget takes a look at some of the medical words used to narrow the field.

Should we be surprised at what she finds? (via Health Care Renewal)

Some say following the DASH diet for hypertension is almost the equivalent of being on a blood pressure medication. Problem is, no one is following it:

"Few adults with known hypertension follow the DASH diet," said Dr. Mellen. "We appear to be going in the wrong direction. The dietary quality of hypertensive adults has deteriorated since the DASH diet became incorporated in the national guidelines."

MedPage Today with more on the Speaker XDR-TB case.

"Who cares?", says Nortin Hadler. I'm sure a few endocrinologists would take issue with that:

I have practiced medicine for 40 years. I have never prescribed a pill to lower blood sugar. I still see no reason to do so. If I am disadvantaging my patients, it's to a trivial degree at most. However, I know I am sparing them known and unknown hazards.

And I won't ...

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Is the CDC above the fray?

Exceeded $1.1 billion last year in California:

Mehlman said Los Angeles County, especially, should not be partnering with the consulate to provide health services. "The county is broke, they are cutting back on services, they are closing emergency rooms, yet they are dreaming up new ways to provide benefits to illegal aliens," he said. "It's lunacy."

Health services to illegal immigrants in Los Angeles County cost the Medi-Cal program nearly ...

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