A pulmonologist talks about his own end-stage cancer:

In a few hours, Edwards was to give a talk about hospice care to a church group in Newberg. He drove there, but he didn't talk about hospice.

"I'm dying, and I just fully realized it this afternoon," is how he remembers starting his talk. Some in the audience wept.

"All my life, I've been looking for teachable moments," ...

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The latest road hazard? Heart attacks:

A new study out of Ireland Monday found that one in 14 men suffering a heart attack got behind the wheel to drive himself to the hospital.
Anyone with chest pain should be going to the hospital via ambulance.

Flat screen TVs and internet access. More on luxury patient rooms:

But are private rooms and Internet access necessary as employers, politicians and patient advocates scramble to come up with ways to control skyrocketing health-care costs?

"It all sounds nice, but where's the money coming from?" said Cathy Levine, executive director of the Universal Health Care Action Network of Ohio, a patient-advocacy group.

A UK doctor is fed up with waiting room violence and won't take it any more:

The doctor gave chase in his car after hearing the sound of glass shattering when he was treating a 10-year-old girl in his consulting room on Friday afternoon.

Today is National Sickie Day in the UK:

A new report has named Monday, 6 February as National Sickie Day, the date when more workers phone or text their boss with a fake illness than on any day of the year.

A survey of 4,000 employees revealed the reason: widespread dissatisfaction with the number of official holidays, coupled with a need to recharge batteries after the initial post-Christmas shock ...

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Medicare Part D update: What looks good on paper often is found lacking in reality.

More hospitals are adding private rooms. "In a region losing population, hospital officials have to find ways to compete for a smaller pool of patients, he said. Private rooms create selling points of patient dignity, personal space and comfort as well as privacy, especially in the era of the federal Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, which requires health providers and others to protect patient identity and information."

Merck tried to alter hypertension "guidelines" to favor Cozaar. That's pretty shameful.

"There's nothing worse than a doctor's receptionist who insists you tell her what is wrong in a room full of other patients." Read how one senior dealt with it.

Ongoing Vioxx trial follies:

Her attorneys had called Dr. Michael Graham as an expert to say that Vioxx could cause blood clots in that short a time and had caused the one that brought on Irvin's fatal heart attack in 2001.

But U.S. District Judge Eldon E. Fallon ruled late Friday that Graham wasn't qualified to do that. He wrote that the doctor has no pharmacology training, isn't qualified ...

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An ultrasound technician misread over 1,000 echocardiograms in the UK. Aren't cardiologists supposed to be the ones reading echos?

An illegally street-racing car plows into a medical clinic. "Witnesses said one woman had her legs severed; another lost one of her legs."

Pfizer gets reprimanded for its Zantac 150 ad. "NAD said in a statement that it determined consumers could 'reasonably take away from the commercial the message that Zantac 150 works almost immediately.' While noting that Zantac does indeed work quickly, relief is not 'immediate,' according to NAD"

All gone. Sanofi-Aventis sold out of next year's flu vaccine in just a few hours:

Sanofi-Aventis, the company that produced much of the flu vaccine for this season, committed about 50 million doses of vaccine to customers Tuesday "” everything it planned to produce by October "” in just a few hours, according to Reuters news service.

"Doctors are already having problems ordering vaccine for next year and ...

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It's nice to have the state Supreme Court in your pocket. Less than 7 months after Wisconsin got rid of caps, lawyers enjoy a malpractice windfall of $8.4 million:

A Dane County jury this week awarded $8.4 million, including $4.25 million in damages for pain and suffering, to a patient who had suffered serious health problems following surgery. The former cap on such noneconomic damages in Wisconsin was ...

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You'd think that yelling "I've been stabbed" would get you medical attention. We'll, think again:

A teenager bleeding profusely after being stabbed in the back was treated by patients in a GP's waiting room after being ignored by doctors and staff, it was claimed today.

For 20 minutes patients used toilet paper to stem the flow of blood from two four inch deep wounds in Damien Palmer's back.

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The next in the NY Times' excellent Being a Patient series - about complementary medicine:

The most telling evidence of Americans' dissatisfaction with traditional health care is the more than $27 billion they spend annually on alternative and complementary medicine, according to government estimates. In ways large and small, millions of people are taking active steps to venture outside the mainstream, whether by taking the herbal remedy echinacea ...

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A doctor routinely gives anti-gay literature during office visits:

Jamie Beiler of Kississimmee, Fla., who consulted Dr. John Hartman for a routine matter, said she was "shocked and outraged" when she opened the sealed envelope handed to her by Hartman's assistant, Dawn Pope-Wright. Inside, she found a three-part selection of scriptural quotes under the headings: "Homosexual activity is sinful and sexually impure," "While homosexual activity is sin and impure, it ...

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Next time you take pictures of patients' genitals for educational purposes, or publication in the BMJ, please make sure you get their consent first:

Dr Christopher Valentine, 43, said he took pictures featuring a range of medical conditions at a Scots hospital for "educational and training" purposes. Images of their penises and vaginas ended up in publications including the British Medical Journal.

A man, forced by his parents to marry four times in six months, lands in a psychiatric hospital:

And though weddings are supposed to be happy and joyous occasions, the son doesn't seem to think so, for he has now been admitted to a hospital for psychological treatment, and is refusing to see his parents or his wives.