Online pharmacies

"The Internet has become a pharmaceutical candy store."

Grim news pervades the medical blogosphere today.

Fat Doctor has announced she is shutting down her blog:

Someone in my department printed out my blog and showed it to my boss. He tells me he didn't read it and won't interfere in what I do with my own time as long as I do a good job at work.
Flea's blog mysteriously vanished. Perhaps not coincidentally, ...

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They're just as harmful as regular cigarettes:

"Smoking low-tar, low-nicotine cigarettes impairs the coronary flow velocity reserve as severely as smoking regular cigarettes," they reported online in Heart, a BMJ specialty journal. "Coronary flow velocity reserve values are similar in light cigarette and regular cigarette smokers and significantly lower than in controls."

Staggering ignorance by a bunch of vandals:

A paediatrician at a south Wales hospital has been forced out of her home by vandals who thought her job title meant the same as "paedophile".

South African-born Yvette Cloete woke up at her home in Newport to find the term "paedo" spray painted all over her walls.

The specialist registrar at the Royal Gwent Hospital is now in hiding at ...

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OnThePharm with round 2 of the popular contest.

This article was from six years ago:

Lots of patients fork over nothing but a co-pay, the mandatory cash outlay that can be as low as $10, or even $2. "What do you value a physician at if you pay $2?" asks Stracher, who says that sometimes, for that amount, patients blithely skip even bringing along money. For two bucks, patients sometimes don't show up. Or they get the idea ...

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Can Dr. Groopman's theories apply to the real world? Ron Sen suggests not:

Call this self-serving if you like, but most introspective physicians wallow in a sea of uncertainty as a weighty part of our professional lives, just as much as you traders do, but with different consequences. I would tell Dr. Groopman that he might know something about how physicians think, but he might also just be ...

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Dr. Wes speculates that he would have benefited from an automatic defibrillator.

Some have asked me if I've ever trained in the VA. I did my 3rd year medicine rotation, 4th year medicine sub-internship, 3 years of medicine residency including numerous VA rotations, and moonlighted for 3 years in the ER, all at the VA. So the answer is yes.

More fallout from last week's story about how the VA exaggerates its quality claims:

Deceptions about appointment wait ...

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Is Flea gone?

His blog has been wiped out, as I found out while doing my daily link browsing. He has been going through some litigation, and Dr. A speculates on his possible demise. Let's hope this is only temporary.

In detailing a simple car crash story, this newspaper felt the need to explain what a D.O. does, incompletely:

Baez is a doctor of osteopathy, a hospital spokesman said yesterday. Osteopathy is a drug-free, non-invasive medical practice that focuses on total body health by treating the musculo-skeletal system, including joints, muscles and the spine.
Reminds me of this story, where Time felt the public didn't know what a D.O. ...

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Diabetes and kids

Obesity in kids is leading to diabetes at a younger age:

Now, an analysis of the claims processed by Medco Health Solutions, a manager of pharmacy benefits, finds that the use of drugs to treat type 2 diabetes in kids between the ages of 10 and 19 doubled between 2001 and 2006. The overall numbers remain relatively low "” about 1.47 per 1,000, the Financial Times reports. But the rising ...

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This is an explicit way to pressure physicians who order too many tests. Think of Medicare as just another large health insurer looking to cut costs:

CMS has the data and computer capacity to identify physicians who are inefficient compared with their colleagues and as early as mid-2008 might begin to contact those physicians and ask them to become more efficient . . . Kuhn said that identification of inefficient ...

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Newsweek spends 5 days at Grady Memorial's ER in Atlanta. What they found was not pretty, yet pretty routine at the same time:

Gunshot wounds. Blood and brain matter. Exhausted nurses, endless wait times"”and no end in sight. The only thing scarier than an average Saturday evening in the ER: What if it was forced to close?

More reaction to yesterday's WSJ sobering op-ed:

So a Democratic governor tries to force an ultra-liberal program that had failed once on a national level and failed to garner even one vote of his own party. So what happened to the centerpiece health care idea of the liberal left? It was a combination of lack of political support among people who would normally be considered his allies and stark ...

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Roy Poses on the dangers of the retail health clinic's formulaic approach to medicine.

The LA Times on the idiocy of this idea:

"That makes about as much sense as taxing teachers to provide a better education, or taxing Assembly members or senators to pay for upkeep of the Capitol," said Fink, a Tarzana internist. "We're part of the solution, not the problem." . . .

. . . a March poll by the Public Policy Institute of California found that the levy ...

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A must-read. Gary Schwitzer notes some of the more recent citations by major media where they blatantly ignored the evidence of cancer screening tests (NBC's Nancy Snyderman is the worst offender in my opinion).

I am all for evidence-based cancer screening, and a balanced view needs to be communicated. This includes the very real risks of screening, including the concept of false positives and the harms ...

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Kim Painter writes more on medical blogs, and focuses on the privacy issue. (via David Rothman)

Looking for early signs of autism is part of this growing field:

Doctors and scientists are increasingly looking for early signs in babies of autism, attention deficit disorder and other mental problems that just a generation ago, scarcely anyone thought could appear in children so young.

Some scientists even believe that intensive treatment in some susceptible babies can actually prevent autism, attention deficit disorder and other problems.

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