A blood test will be done to prove they have not been smoking:

The ruling, authorised by Health Secretary Patricia Hewitt, comes after medical research conclusively showed smokers take longer to recover from surgery.

It is thought that 500,000 smokers a year will be affected.

Pioneering surgery in Spain.

Are slimmer physicians better at getting the message across?

"Some of us are the worst role models," acknowledged Bellinger, who at one point carried 285 pounds on his 6-foot-4 frame. "We work long hours, and do a lot of intermittent eating of terrible things."

Hernandez, who worked as a family doctor while she was at her heaviest, said it was awkward advising patients to watch their diet and exercise ...

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A workaround for the current FDA law banning compensating blood donors.

Eric Turkewitz calls up the plaintiff's attorney and gets some answers on legal strategy:

So I called plaintiff's counsel, Elizabeth Mulvey, of Crowe & Mulvey to find out. She told me she was tipped off to his blog by another attorney. How did the other attorney know? Because Flea had blogged about a subject that Mulvey had spoken on some time back and the other attorney realized that she ...

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Bizarre malpractice case where the Air Force was successfully sued. A midwife outranked a physician, but still called the shots:

Murphy said Air Force medical providers allowed military rank to interfere in the mother's care.

The judge determined that throughout the delivery, providers treated the midwife, who was a major, as if she were a physician. The judge says they deferred to her out of rank. The doctor ...

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What strange bedfellows:

But many others, including those in the medical community, are hoping Moore will help make a difference. "Anything"”including a film"”that can bring this issue into the public eye is good for the debate," says heart surgeon Dr. William Plested, president of the American Medical Assn. "So, I'm cheering on Michael Moore, even though I haven't seen the film."

Wonder why he was so adamant to return to the US for treatment of his TB, instead of staying in Italy?

The media ignored the reasoning behind why Speaker acted in what they presented as recklessly risking the spread of a deadly disease. Surely, it would be preferable to undergo free, or at the very least, cheap treatment in a country with what the World Health Organization calls the second ...

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Many doctors are doing this for free:

Without the safety net of Charity Hospital, which has been closed since the storm, the region's uninsured have nowhere to go but the emergency room. There is no real system in place to compensate the people who treat them: Hospitals get a small cut of federal and state money, while doctors receive nothing.

Orthopedic surgeons, neurosurgeons and other specialists who take ...

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An op-ed voices concerns about retail health clinics. Will patients care?

A mini clinic makes recommendations and treatment decisions based less on personal context and more on general guidelines. Mini clinics currently do not have access to patient medical records and histories, follow-up on treatments or establish a patient-physician relationship. Without these capabilities, some symptoms of greater illness might go unnoticed by these medical professionals. At mini clinics, a ...

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Dr. Wes comments on what's happening in California:

Amazing that California's Board of Chiropractic Examiners recently adopted a resolution stating that "manipulation under anesthesia" falls under a chiropractic's scope of service, while also recently abandoning the requirement for doctors of Chiropractic in California to train in CPR.

CPR Teddy

Medgadget wonders if this is helpful or creepy.

Stop expecting a medical buffet:

In no way is any socialized, quasi-socialized, or we-swear-it-aint-socialized scheme going to do a thing to lower the cost of medical care unless fundamental changes are made in the way we conduct health care business. As these fundamental changes mostly involve the rationing of care for people who expect limitless access, the voting public is never going to buy it unless they are tricked into it ...

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The FINGER study

GI researchers with a sense of humor.

Prostate cancer patients and patient advocates may be sending threats to prominent prostate cancer experts for opposing approval of a new drug:

Two prominent prostate cancer experts have been threatened for opposing approval of a controversial new drug and are being protected by bodyguards as they attend ASCO, The New York Times reports.

The experts, Howard Scher of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and Maha Hussain of the University of ...

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Short, unregulated hit pieces are getting some pharmaceutical executives worried:

These budding Michael Moores are a worry to the industry "because there are no internal controls on YouTube," says Dorothy Wetzel, former consumer-marketing chief at Pfizer and now senior VP-management supervisor at Saatchi & Saatchi, New York, where she works on AstraZeneca accounts. "But," she added, "you have to get used to it, because it's here to stay."
...

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A recent study looks at what kind of implants will lead to possible travel delays in the airport:

As part of the study, 129 patients with 149 various implants walked through an "M-scope three-zone" metal detector -- a common type at airports -- at high and low sensitivity ratings.

Half of the patients -- 52 percent -- sailed through without the implants being detected. They usually had small ...

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Some bloggers are criticizing the "unnamed Atlanta medical official" who revealed Mr. Speaker's identity:

We seem to agree that at least one of the anonymous sources who gave or confirmed the patient's name to the media may have violated one or more laws. My thought was that the unnamed "Atlanta medical official" violated HIPAA if the patient's identity was discussed within the official's professional work related to the case. There's ...

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Hillarycare

The WSJ on what she's thinking:

Mrs. Clinton also nodded at medical malpractice reform. She neglected, however, to support the proposals that would actually reduce costs, such as punitive damage caps and specialized medical courts. These, not incidentally, are also the programs most vigorously opposed by the tort bar.
Rich Lowry comments. (via Catron)

First Canada, now the Australians want the site shut down:

The Australian Medical Association said yesterday the website should be closed because it was irresponsible and lacked objectivity.
(via Dr. RW)

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